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Old 08-09-2012, 11:18   #16
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

We made the plunge in 2000.. Sold the house, bought the boat and moved onboard.... I left BellSouth as even though I was 49, had 30 yrs service so got full retirement....
I started a yacht delivery business and was having fun...
Our "anchor" was my father in law... The admiral was his only relative and he lived with us from 1991 till we moved onboard.. We then put him in an apt. at our marina till 4 yrs ago when he went into a nursing home.
We were never able to go on any LONG cruises, mostly 1-4 days.
He passed on June 6th (D day) at the age of 96- a WWII vet.....
I was called back to BellSouth in 2003 on a "temp" job, which lasted till May 4th of this year where they gave me a 2nd retirement, a 2nd 401 and again all the benifits plus threw in an extra 79 weeks pay to go.....
So now at 61, we're planning on doing some cruising....Luckily neither of us have any major health problems... But now it's finally OUR TIME...
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Old 08-09-2012, 11:23   #17
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

Glad I went young. Getting old is not for the weak!
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Old 08-09-2012, 11:33   #18
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

It's a myth. Go young while your mind and body can enjoy it to the max!

My parents went in their early 30s. My woman and I did a stint in our late 20s and now here we are again in our early 40s with our son as well.

We met a couple of young guys recently who, aged 22 and 24 and from Europe and the UK, bought a boat for $5000 in St Maarten and now they out here in the Pacific, heading to Australia, where they will look for work.

Another boat has a couple of Europeans in their early 30s who turned their backs on their professions (doctor and lawyer) in order to sail around the world. The money is running out and they will also look for any sort of work in Oz.

We got pissed last night with some Brazilians in their early 30s, out here living it up. Their fridge stopped working, they gave it the flotation test, it failed and they continue on. Living in the moment.

Their retirement funds? They are vaguely aware of it, but seem to be more concerned with accumulating memories and experiences than storing away $$ that might all disappear in the next financial crash anyway.

There are still more oldies out here than young ones, but that is a demographic effect of the baby boomers more than anything. The oldies have electric anchor winches, don't row their dinghies and wait for the part to fix their fridge rather than adjusting their lifestyle.

But at least they managed to escape the rat race and leave!

Life is so, so short...
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Old 08-09-2012, 11:41   #19
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

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Originally Posted by rognvald View Post
Are the Golden Years a myth or reality-- especially as it relates to sailing?
Same as the rest of reality. Whatever you think it is.

The only thing that exists is this moment right now. A handy exercise, try and think of things in the past which you spent lots of time worrying about, then compare that with what actually happened. And count the bad bits which happened completely unannounced.
I think most people in the west spend far too much time planning, worrying and trying to control the future. When it doesn't really work. Just get on with being happy today and tomorrow pretty much will pan out fine.

Probably
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:05   #20
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

Is this a good spot for that well-used quote first attributed to H.Jackson Brown's mother:

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover."
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:14   #21
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canibul View Post
Is this a good spot for that well-used quote first attributed to H.Jackson Brown's mother:

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didnít do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover."
Hmmm... I always though that was originally came from Samuel Clements, you know, Mark Twain?
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:17   #22
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

I always thought so, too. We both were wrong. Twain never wrote it, nor is there a record of him saying it. First attributed to Brown, in a book published in 1990, and he attributed it to his mother.

Twenty Years From Now You Will Be More Disappointed By The Things You Didn’t Do Than By The Ones You Did Do | Quote Investigator
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:41   #23
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

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We are told in our culture when we are young to work hard, save our money and when we retire we will be able to do all the things we couldn't do when we were young since we will have both the time and the money. Are the Golden Years a myth or reality-- especially as it relates to sailing?
In my office there are three people in their 70s...Plenty in their upper 60s. (over 50% in my office are above 55) It's not that they don't have the money. One even has a 39' boat in Florida that they hardly get to. Maybe they are working for the better healthcare...I really don't know. Maybe they are addicted to work?

My Father retired when he was 51, owns a house, and has had good health. My Mother is still together with him and they work to do a lot in their retirement. But they now have grandkids to spend time with and babysit. They couldn't 'get away' for 3-6 months anymore though.

I am torn between working hard (what I've been doing), and just sailing away and saying the system isn't working. But healthcare and food are nice and for better or worse, you need money for them in this country. There isn't an 'end' to my job that I can see though. It's not like I will get a pension or will be able to get healthcare through my company when I 'retire'.
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:47   #24
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

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Mostly a myth, for a few reasons:
  • Health - most people have at least one chronic issue by the time they're 65.
  • Ability - health aside, many people can't (or won't) do at 65 what they can or are willing to do at 50 or 55
  • Self-delusion - it's often foolish to plan to do something in retirement that you aren't doing now, especially a big commitment like distance cruising? How do you know you'll even like it if you haven't done it yet?
  • The Retirement "Crash" - how often have you heard of people who work hard til retirement, and then fall apart (eg heart attack) in retirement?
  • Disappearing pensions - fewer and fewer of us have solid pensions and this trend is on the increase. Plus, the bastards are raising the legal retirement age. It's less of a sure thing for most of us.

Our philosophy is that anything after age 50 is gravy. If you make it to 50 and you have health and are comfortable financially, you've beaten the odds, you're now in life's bonus round. We took the summer off and went to Europe when we turned 50. My wife was able to use a big severance to get out of the rat-race and into a lower-paying occupation that she adores... I'm planning something similar. We grab every opportunity we can to explore, to party, to vacation. I don't know if we'll ever become live-aboards, but we have some long cruises in the planning.

Frankly, it might be better to 'retire' at 50 or so, then take a menial job again at 65 or 70 if/when the money runs out. It's proven that people who stay engaged and active live longer and stay sharper.
I think this post is closest to the truth, as I've seen it. I've passed 50 and found that taking more time is easier, planning is easier, and longer cruises are easier, perhaps even than they were when I was 40, because I know more.

I'm hoping I can look at retirement as a gradual thing, but we'll see. One of the toughest issues, for many and for me, is that my spouse is nearly uninsurable and so until she reaches 65 (I'll be 68), insurance is a major problem. From my perspective, this is the greatest problem with our health care system; if we were not married her life would be a tough struggle to maintain a full time job, regardless of health issues, just to maintain insurance. Our system doesn't provide a middle road, for people who could work part time, for example.

But I love her.
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:49   #25
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

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Originally Posted by Canibul View Post
I always thought so, too. We both were wrong. Twain never wrote it, nor is there a record of him saying it. First attributed to Brown, in a book published in 1990, and he attributed it to his mother.

Twenty Years From Now You Will Be More Disappointed By The Things You Didn’t Do Than By The Ones You Did Do | Quote Investigator

Interesting, especially since the misattribution has occurred relatively recently.
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:53   #26
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

Golden years! Yes, could have been had I not gathered too much stuff to maintain.

Retired at 46. Started rebuilding the boat, building a house, building some smaller boats, working with a community association, started a yacht club, taught sailing and I'm still rebuilding the boat and building a cabin. Maybe I'll get cruising or living aboard again but now am 67 and still working on the boat. I've had fun helping others launch their boats and have a lot of invitations to sail here and there so my hand is still in the sailing part. But, retirement for me has been hard work.

kind regards,
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Old 08-09-2012, 13:17   #27
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

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One of the toughest issues, for many and for me, is that my spouse is nearly uninsurable and so until she reaches 65 (I'll be 68), insurance is a major problem. From my perspective, this is the greatest problem with our health care system; if we were not married her life would be a tough struggle to maintain a full time job, regardless of health issues, just to maintain insurance. Our system doesn't provide a middle road, for people who could work part time, for example.

But I love her.
Glad you love her. You might note that the "hated (by some)" ObamaCare would bail you out there. Still can't understand why folks hate it so much.

Back to the subject. My wife said to me, many years ago: "Do it now or we'll never be in good enough shape if we wait."

She was right. Although we didn't go on a long cruise, we used our boat sometimes even more often than weekly, and spent almost every summer in Europe, many times on canal bareboats - lovely, long trips. Most of the times we were away for a month or more. We also did a lot of house exchanges.

In January 2009, I broke my leg skiing! And I told my son that this was going to be the LAST time I went skiing because it was getting too hard to put the damn boots on! Yup, it WAS my last time skiing!

Then the titanium plate they put in my leg broke just as I was starting to walk again in August. My muscles (at then 63 years old) didn't much take to "being on vacation" for a full year. They still have not all come back.

And my wife's joints are deteriorating making it harder for her to get around.

I'm back to using the boat at least once a week, and have forgone daysails for at least one night on the hook. It's a PITA to do the mainsail cover!!!

If we hadn't gone THEN, we wouldn't be in shape for all of that NOW. We shared many of those canal trips with her parents, who were in their 70s and 80s back then. Her mom died 2 years ago. But we have the memories and the pictures to prove it!

"Go small, go now, go often!"

Another friend advised me: "Work a little between vacations."

Golden Years? Make 'em ALL golden!

Don't wait.

Great question, BTW, thanks.
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Old 08-09-2012, 13:44   #28
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

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Interesting, especially since the misattribution has occurred relatively recently.
Yes. my guess is that someone read the book, mis-attributed the quote to Clemens for some reason, and then it got picked up by others. early 90's = early internet. Can see how a misquote could become a de facto reference.

Searching my memory, I am unable to remember when I first read that quote. I do know I always believed it was a "Mark Twain' standard. but I do know I would have remembered it if I had read it when I was young. And it would have been popular and famous when I was young, and I've probably read the majority of what was published by Mark Twain.

I am almost positive that I first encountered that by reading it on the internet. for me that would have been around Nov. 94, when that damned AOL free floppy showed up in the mail.

If this Quote specialist guy couldn't find an earlier written reference before 1990, with all his resources, it would fit with my memory. Which is usually pretty good.. Do you remember where you were when you first read that? You're a sailor, you'd remember it. You might have wanted to add it to your 'signature'; I did.

I sometimes use quotes in this expat blog thing that I write. I was ' burnt and learnt' to do a little research to get the wording right, etc. I've been surprised by how many quotes commonly attributed to popular figures actually originated somewhere else.
I think this one, for example. Heck, I already KNEW Clemens wasn't a sailor, too. He was a fresh water power boater, come to think of it.
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Old 08-09-2012, 16:38   #29
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

Without a Doubt one of the most discussed subjects in the world,live young work old,problem most folks can't afford enjoyable crusing at a younger age.Then how long will you be active as you grow older,I,am 66 today many ailments all structure related,I,had a very active life,now what only time will tell.No Great Quote
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Old 08-09-2012, 17:19   #30
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Re: The Golden Years: Myth or Reality?

Connie and I have been actively cruising for ever ! She as an RN and my delivery jobs have maintained our cruiseing lifestyle for over 40 yrs ! Im 74 and she is 60, and we just bought our new to us boat !! with the things available today for sailing a boat with much less work then even 20 yrs ago, theres no reason for anyone with even just average health can't cruise !! but we reasoned that we wanted to raise our kids in a cruiseing lifestyle !! So we started at a younger age !! It can be done! with the money weve made and invested we still can cruise in a comfortable style even if some would call it bare bones !! I can still do almost all the work needed on any boat , mine or others ! if ya can don't wait the world is changeing fast !! get out there while it's still good ! Cus every year ya wait theres more and more rules !! it was better 30 yrs ago and even 10 yrs ago it was a lot simpler to cruise without to many rules !! don't wait till the so called Golden years ! cus ya may not be as lucky as we have with our health !! Ya never know what tommrow will bring !! So go as soon as ya can !!you will never be sorry !! Thats my 2 cents
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