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Old 17-05-2016, 07:24   #1
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Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

I have done my research but am coming up a bit empty handed. Maybe it is because it involves finances and people are apprehensive to divulge too much. My question does NOT involve how much it takes to live aboard and cruise. My husband (55) and I (46) are looking to retire and cruise until we no longer can. I'm finding we are so concerned that we will never have enough money. Fear of outliving it and ending up in some state institution when we are in our 80's. My question is this, how did you become comfortable with the unknown in regards to outliving your money? We desperately want to say screw it and go, but that stupid fear of being abandoned to the state in our older years is totally messing with us. We have more saved and invested than the average couple my husbands age (by statistic standards) but when we figure it out on paper, it just doesn't seem to last as long as we are comfortable with. Definitely not as much as some of the folks I read about with a $450k cat. I am working on a few things to be able to earn income while we are away but they have yet to take off. I'm interested in hearing others stories who made live aboard cruising a way of life and becoming comfortable with the investments and savings you did acquire to just go do it. As we get older the concern for a health scare is definitely more at the forefront than it use to be. I've read some who carry insurance and some who don't because of affordable out of pocket in some countries. To avoid losing everything if we did get severely ill, we would still carry health insurance although it drastically cuts into the cruising kitty. Ahhhhh! So many things to think about and just go!! help!
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Old 17-05-2016, 10:03   #2
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

It is a hard call to make as to when you really have enough. Health costs are the biggest scariest concern that was hanging over my head. My responsibilities to any children changed recently, so passing on anything is no longer a concern.

At some point I made a decision that it was more important to go sailing now and not worry about what I will be able to do in my 80's or later. I guess I have seen to many people delay their dreams for more security later, only to see them run out of life before they ran out of money.

It is a very difficult decision to make, one I think you will never be sure of. You will always be second guessing yourself as to what was the "right" thing to do.
I hope you find and answer.

For myself, I spent a long time agonizing over the decision. Then one day I just said the heck with it. I have always survived, and I know I will survive in the future. If I made a bad choice I'll live with the consequences. Much like I have always done in life.

Good luck to you in making your decision. I hope you find a solution that is right for you.
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Old 17-05-2016, 10:20   #3
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

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It is a hard call to make as to when you really have enough. Health costs are the biggest scariest concern that was hanging over my head. My responsibilities to any children changed recently, so passing on anything is no longer a concern.

At some point I made a decision that it was more important to go sailing now and not worry about what I will be able to do in my 80's or later. I guess I have seen to many people delay their dreams for more security later, only to see them run out of life before they ran out of money.

It is a very difficult decision to make, one I think you will never be sure of. You will always be second guessing yourself as to what was the "right" thing to do.
I hope you find and answer.

For myself, I spent a long time agonizing over the decision. Then one day I just said the heck with it. I have always survived, and I know I will survive in the future. If I made a bad choice I'll live with the consequences. Much like I have always done in life.

Good luck to you in making your decision. I hope you find a solution that is right for you.
Thanks Paul! I rarely hear talk about the struggle concerning this so I appreciate your response greatly. We have so much to learn so I think looking out three years is reasonable, just not sure I can wait the 5 like my husband wants for fear of economic security. I too remind him how everything works out and we are a resourceful couple so I tend to worry about it less. I have a feeling it will come to him much like it came to you. When he gets the case of 'heck with it's', it is hard to stop him!
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Old 17-05-2016, 10:27   #4
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

I sat down with a Professional financial planner after determining I need XXXX number of dollars per month in 2016 money to live, He determined that I have 95% chance of cruising for six years, and buying a house for XXXXXX after 6 years, and continuing to withdraw the same amount of money adjusted for inflation. I assumed making 5% on the money on average, cause you have to have assumptions, nobody knows for sure.

It does take far more money than I would have thought, partially cause of the interest you can get on investments and I couldn't do it if I didn't have multiple sources of income as well as upcoming Social Security etc.

The hard part is sustainability of course, I hope one day to buy a Trawler when we are too old to sail, not a house in six years, but you do have to have a plan, and I don't think in my case I could get the Wife to sign up for a floating life forever. There is something deeply ingrained with not having a house, I don't understand it, but it is a primary NEED for many.
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Old 17-05-2016, 11:23   #5
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

Quote:
Originally Posted by TomAndLee View Post
I'm finding we are so concerned that we will never have enough money. Fear of outliving it and ending up in some state institution when we are in our 80's. My question is this, how did you become comfortable with the unknown in regards to outliving your money?
Not really a cruising question. This is a question that everyone should ask themselves, if they ever hope to retire. And, of course, the earlier you start thinking about this, the easier it is to position yourself so that you do NOT run out of money.

Maybe I'm unusual and/or OCD about this, but when I was still in my 30s I started putting together spreadsheets to track what we were spending, what we were accumulating in retirement savings, and what we might expect from Social Security and pensions. I put in a lot of time and thought putting this all together in the beginning, but for the last several decades now I have spent less than an hour a month keeping it up.

As a result, I have a very good idea of where we are financially, when I can retire (my wife already has), and how long our money will last (or, more accurately, how much we will leave behind at the end... hint: not much!).

So, how much do you spend now? How much do you expect to spend in retirement? How much do you guess that inflation will be? How much do you expect to earn on your investments? Put this all together and it is pretty easy to see if have enough to last. Of course, you do have to make a number of estimates. As already mentioned, no one has a crystal ball, no one knows the future. Still, there is enough historical data available to make these kinds of estimates reasonably reliable.

Good luck.
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Old 17-05-2016, 11:49   #6
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

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Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
I sat down with a Professional financial planner after determining I need XXXX number of dollars per month in 2016 money to live, He determined that I have 95% chance of cruising for six years, and buying a house for XXXXXX after 6 years, and continuing to withdraw the same amount of money adjusted for inflation. I assumed making...
We sat down with a planner as well although I have been avoiding him for the past few years as we are on track but now that our idea of retirement has changed, it probably wouldn't hurt to make that appointment with him.

Never thought about going to a trawler afterwards...food for thought there!

Quote:
Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
Not really a cruising question. This is a question that everyone should ask themselves, if they ever hope to retire. And, of course, the earlier you start thinking about this, the easier it is to position yourself so that you do NOT run out of money....
While I do agree it isn't really a cruising question, I felt most in my age bracket can't help but to think of it when giving up the security of a land based home. My mother for instance owns her home, rarely spends any money and lives a very comfortable life on what I consider to be very little income. She's happy. But with cruising there are so many variables and spending scenarios with breakdowns, change of desire to cruise further and the distance of getting to (what I have grown to believe..right or wrong) state of the art health care in dire emergencies. I feel the risk is greater but I could be misled. It could all just be how most of us are programmed to believe the way things should be. As common as livingaboard and cruising is becoming, it is still not the norm.
Thankfully my husband is the money man and without him I don't know that I would have learned to become as conscious about purchases and spending. I was a hairdresser for far too long and did not ever think I would even live to be this old thus I did not save much so we are playing a bit of catch up. We don't need a lot, we don't require a lot but once every couple years we do purchase something we really don't need. I think with our retirement goal changing we are much more focused than ever.
I definitely agree about being able to make the estimates more reliable. We will keep crunching the numbers, paying attention to spending and just make it happen. We want to and so we will!
Thank you!
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Old 17-05-2016, 11:54   #7
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

Two interesting websites when considering retirement are

Cfire Sim/

and/or

Fire Calc/

They do alot of the work Denverd0n stated above.

In general the 4% rule is always a good starting point. For every million you have saved you can spend 40k per year, plus inflation. If you can reduce that to 3.5% or lower the probability of never running out of money is relatively high (98-99% when using historical models).

The biggest unknown is always going to be medical expenses. If you can make it to the age where you can get medicare the risk is somewhat lowered.
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Old 17-05-2016, 12:02   #8
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

I see Cruising as being cheaper than living in a house. My Property taxes were right at $6,000 a yr, add in cost of keeping the house and yard up, an automobile, utilities and other land based necessities and I think your at more than what a boat costs to keep up.

I hope its cheaper, cause I'm planning on having 1/3 of the income we now have, yet by almost all accounts, I won't need even that much.
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Old 17-05-2016, 12:10   #9
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

Who said you had to go all in? We've been cruising five months on and seven months off working for six years now, while saving up another five years for full retirement. We began at age 52.

The answer to your other question: Investment properties. Rental income either commercial or residential, this is the ticket to freedom.

Let other people pay for your retirement.
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Old 17-05-2016, 12:29   #10
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

We are not as well off as some. 2 divorces and 4 kids (with child support and 1 alimony) between us left both of us just keeping our heads above water when we met. He is 53 this year and I will be 49 this month.

We are taking a certain amount of risk in retiring now instead of at the government prescribed 62. But with careful money management and willingness to stick to budget we should be OK. We have greatly simplified our needs to do this.

We also have the mindset that "now" is the only way to go. As we age our bodies may not be in sync with our brains. I don't want to forgo dreams and plans because we waited too late. We can no longer fool ourselves that there is "always tomorrow".

When we do reach an age where long passages across the oceans no longer appeals or is wise, there are other ways to cruise. We don't have to give everything up and sit in a rocker. Trawler maybe, reduced cruising grounds or other things we have not thought of yet.

My mother raised 2 kids with only her income. It was never "enough" but always adequate. It depends on your priorities.
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Old 17-05-2016, 12:34   #11
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

Been there - Done that! Several times with varying results!

Here is way more than you wanted to know. And much of what seems to be a concern about money and the future is often concerns about life in general.

My wife and I met in 1974 at which time I was a semi-professional sailor. I managed race boats, taught sailing, delivered boats, and spent a whole lot of time sailing. I told her from the day we met:
- no children
- we will head off sailing as soon as we can afford it
- no 9 to 5 job for me

I was in graduate school at the time we met and needed 5-years to earn 42 credits for a Masters degree. Sailing and climbing were much more important than school). I started a very successful computer business and made a lot of money, much of which we saved.

I was also very good with numbers and finance (part of my computer consulting business) and knew “THE NUMBER”, which was the investment amount we needed to retire at my age 50 (1997). That investment amount would assure us a comfortable but not extravagant life style for the next 60-years. My wife’s mother’s family all lived into their late 90s and we needed to plan for her living to that age.

I built, over a period of 10-years, an elaborate, some say obsessive / compulsive / way over the top spreadsheet world to model any conceivable economic, financial, political, medical situation in which we might find ourselves. The system had three workbooks, over 50 worksheets and tens of thousands of rows in those sheets. The system included a vast array of historical data, US economy stock market data. It also included Monte Carlo systems and ‘what if” scenarios.

Bottom Line for this discussion – I planned the heck out of our future. I envisioned every possible scenario and made contingency plans for all of them. The work I did for our planning was an extension of the professional consulting work I did for the largest computer users around the world. I was 100% certain of my work and predictions.

My wife worked in a well-paid technical position. We lived on her salary and saved most of mine. We were active investors in real estate and stocks. We put 30% of our gross income going into pre-tax savings each year.

We purchased a new boat (SV Mirador) in February 1995 and spent the next five-years making her our perfect long distance live aboard cruiser.

We hit “The Number” (total net worth and income producing assets) in 1996 at which time my wife and I had been a couple for 22 years. We had spent thousands of hours reviewing our financial situation and future plans.

SO – let’s plan to sail south to Mexico in ’97 or ’98!

That is when I discovered several things about my wife and her life:

- The enormous custom house we purchased, as a short term investment from an estate, in 1982 was now my wife’s home and she was very reluctant to sell it.

- She had worked in the same job since 1981 and loved the work. She was the only woman in a man’s technical world and was highly respected and was very reluctant to give up that position and respect.

- Her family had built a chain of plant nurseries, tree farms, farm implement and hardware stores from scratch. At age 8 she was traveling the western US with her father buying produce to sell at their small highway stand. By the time she was 18 she was running a large hardware store. She loved to work every day.

- She wanted a regular schedule – one that she knew far into the future

- Earned income, from sweat and toil or at least intellectual activity, is real

- Investment income is a phantom seen only on paper and not to be trusted

We needed several more years to work through those concerns.

Beginning in 1999 (I was 52) we started closing out our shore side life and preparing for an extended cruise to parts unknown.

We put our house up for sale in early 2000 and appeared to have it sold in July. My wife “retired” on July 1. We left Puget Sound on Mirador in August 2000 and headed to warmer weather. In early October, while we were in San Diego, the house sale fell through.

Strike 1 in wife’s opinion against “we have all we need and everything is great”

We had to drive back to Puget Sound (rental car because we had sold all our cars and trucks before leaving in August) to make arrangements for house care and maintenance until we could get it sold again. My wife returned to work in November 2000 because her employer loved her work and would do anything to keep her there.

The house did not sell again until July 2001. My wife managed the house sale and ‘extorted’ far more money from the buyers than I ever thought possible. I had been off sailing in Mexico on my brother’s boat and I never anticipated needing another 9-months to sell our 6,000 square foot custom home with 270-degree views of Puget Sound and Mt. Rainier.

Thus – Strike 2 & 3 against “I really know what our financial future holds and have planned for all contingencies.”

We moved back to San Diego and Mirador in late July 2001 and left for our Mexican cruise in November 2001. We were fat, dumb, and happy. We had more than enough money, good investments, and a solid boat.

The US Stock Market tanked in the first half of 2002 and kept plunging through early 2003. The S&P Industrials declined over 35%. SOME of our investments really took a hard hit. I had set up three categories of investments:

- conservative holding funds for about two years of expenses (10% of assets)
- moderately aggressive holding about 40% of our investments
- very aggressive for funds we didn’t need for at least 15-years

Our conservative funds barely rippled and did not lose much value. The other two funds went DOWN, way Down! We lost over 42% on several investments.

I had been an active investor since 1975 and had been through many of the sharp market corrections and down turns. My plans accounted for those losses. I knew that the funds with huge losses would also show huge returns in a few years and everything would work out OK. We had no debt and could easily live on our conservative funds for three or four years if the market downturn continued. We could wait out the market downturn and had really only suffered paper losses. We lost no real money.

But, paper losses were not what my wife saw. She felt we were going broke.

My wife totally freaked out – she completely lost it and panicked, as I’ve never seen her panic. She had never paid attention to our investments and had little understanding of the stock market and economic cycles. All she could see in June 2002 was that we had lost many hundreds of thousands of dollars.

It did not matter to her that I had historical data showing how we had lost even more in previous downturns (1987?) and had always come back to more and better.

At that point her opinion that ‘earned income is real’ and ‘investment income is not something I really trust or can dependent on’ came out loud and clear.

And Strike 4 – just blew me out of the batter’s box. She remembered, in lurid and vivid detail, several horrendous investments I had made in the late ‘80s. I ignored the adamant advice of professionals who tried to save me from my stupidity. The end result was that we lost close to $100K (as in gone without a trace), the IRS closely audited us, and the general partners of one of our limited partnerships were criminally indicted. Only expensive legal talent kept we limited partners from also being indicted.

Strike 5 because “you have a long history of belief in your abilities with a specific failure to perform.”

Several months of contentious discussions ensued and in late fall 2002 my wife again returned to work. As I said, her employer would do almost anything to keep her on the job.

As predicted, our investments did regain all their losses and then made huge profits during 2004 – 2006. Just as I was beginning to convince the wife that it was save to retire again, the great recession of 2007 – 2009 hit. I even went back to work for a while, making less in a day than I used to make in an hour.

We still had no debt and a net worth that most families would consider far more than adequate. But, my wife saw the ’07 recession as just one more sign that only ‘earned income’ is trust worthy.

Part of the problem was that in ’06 thru ‘early ’08 I could not accept that the general US economy was headed so steeply downhill. I moved the money we needed for the next couple years into very conservative bonds but I kept about 70% of our money in aggressive equity funds hoping to see a lot of appreciation once the market turned around. Those funds declined over 35% in value.

My wife had told me to move ALL her assets (the ones we did not plan to touch for another 15-years) into very conservative bond funds. I ignored that advice.

Strike 6 “once again you’ve been way too optimistic in your ability to make money off our investments.”

During the 2010 thru 2013 period my aggressive investment style finally paid off and our investments almost doubled in value. But, my wife still had not forgiven me for leaving all that money exposed to the falling equity market. I have no faith in market timing and invest for the very long term (10+years) and don’t mind a two-year market drop because I know that over the last 80-years the US equity market always comes back.

My wife, on the other hand, hates to see any decline in net worth and would rather take a smaller overall long-term gain that to suffer drastic short term losses.

Toward the end of 2013 I convinced my wife to retire. Our net worth was again headed straight up but more importantly she had 32-years at work and had reached age 55. Her pension would not increase significantly, no matter how much more she worked.

At that time our fixed income (pension and social security) was greater than our annual expenses. Her pension is guaranteed by a very stable pension board, which is required by law to keep the pension reserves at 106% of known and estimated liabilities.

I have now built an even more elaborate Monte Carlo system for modeling future income and investment returns. (Part of my graduate work was in that area and I have 35+ years experience with financial modeling.) That system says we can increase our annual expenses 40% while our net worth also increases into the next 50-years.

Using historical investment returns for the mix of investments we currently hold the system says that in 1,000 runs our net worth in 2055 will be greater than it is today 995 times.

However, my wife still is reluctant to spend money or take on any debt. Our fixed income far exceeds our expenses and we never spend a penny from our investments.

SO – to answer the OP’s original question:

I can live with a lot of uncertainty and I have a lot of confidence in my ability to plan for our financial future. I am willing to take risks and know we can adjust our lifestyle to accommodate changes in our financial status.

My wife hates uncertainty and wants there to be NO possibility of losing money on any investment. She would rather spend nothing than take a chance on even a slight decline in our net worth. The wife wants to know for 100% sure our financial status in 2030, 2040, and 2050.

We will never come to an agreement about acceptable risk and life style choices.

Our compromise is that I spend a little more than necessary on bicycles, computers, and some boat stuff and she ignores my minor spending.
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Old 17-05-2016, 13:28   #12
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

"My question is this, how did you become comfortable with the unknown in regards to outliving your money?"
Drugs will help. Lots of drugs.


Otherwise? Figure out a way to live very frugally, and invest very wisely. Whether that's "risky" or "guaranteed" is a line you have to draw. You can often find short courses or seminars in investing, that will at least give you a grasp of the ways to compare different investments (the market, annuities, long term insurances, etc.) and financial options. Plenty of investment businesses offer these with a free dinner for "pre-retirees" hoping or sometimes hyping to get their future business. By all means, take and compare a few free (or inexpensive unsponsored) ones to get some exposure to the larger picture.
As to how frugally...you have to figure out your own comfort levels. You COULD easily both live to 110, but Social Security has a "death calculator" online that will tell you how long the average person from your birth year is predicted to live. 85 is much more likely, the milk carton has a "sell by" date on it.
And then of course, by that age you might write off the boat (hell, pleasure sailing could be illegal by then, Social Security and Medicare could be universal, or broke, either way) and make a vague guess at what accommodations back on land will cost you. If you buy a property and long-term lease it, at least you can come back to it. But then again, you've got to worry about tenants and property managers and upkeep as well. In the long term, with all the expenses, skyrocketing property values often just reflect inflation.
A yellow legal pad, or a steno pad, where you can write down questions and considerations, can help.
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Old 17-05-2016, 14:11   #13
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

Quote:
Originally Posted by CroMacster View Post
Two interesting websites when considering retirement are

Cfire Sim/

and/or

Fire Calc/
Thanks CroMacster, these are great tools!



Quote:
Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
I see Cruising as being cheaper than living in a house. My Property taxes were right at $6,000 a yr, add in cost of keeping the house and yard up, an automobile, utilities and other...
I sure do hope so!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenomac View Post
Who said you had to go all in? We've been cruising five months on and seven months off working for six years now, while saving up another five years for full retirement. We began at age 52.

The answer to your other question: Investment properties. Rental income either commercial or residential, this is the ticket to freedom.

Let other people pay for your retirement.:big grin:
I like that a lot! Do you manage investment properties the rest of the year?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sea Dreaming View Post
We are not as well off as some. 2 divorces and 4 kids (with child support and 1 alimony) between us left both of us just keeping our heads above water when we met.
We also have the mindset that "now" is the only way to go. As we age our bodies may not be in sync with our brains. I don't want to forgo dreams and plans because we waited too late. We can no longer fool ourselves that there is "always tomorrow".

My mother raised 2 kids with only her income. It was never "enough" but always adequate. It depends on your priorities.
Very true and great outlook!

Quote:
Originally Posted by TacomaSailor View Post
Been there - Done that! Several times with varying results!...
WOW, what a story! I am somewhere between the panic and calm knowing it will all be okay. Thank you so much for sharing all of that with me...all of us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
"My question is this, how did you become comfortable with the unknown in regards to outliving your money?"
Drugs will help. Lots of drugs.


Otherwise? Figure out a way to live very frugally, and invest very wisely. Whether that's "risky" or "guaranteed" is a line you have to draw. You can often find short courses or seminars in investing, that will at least give you a grasp of the ways to compare different investments (the market, annuities, long term insurances, etc.) and financial options. Plenty of investment businesses offer these with a free dinner for "pre-retirees" hoping or sometimes hyping to get their future business. By all means, take and compare a few free (or inexpensive unsponsored) ones to get some exposure to the larger picture.
As to how frugally...you have to figure out your own comfort levels. You COULD easily both live to 110, but Social Security has a "death calculator" online that will tell you how long the average person from your birth year is predicted to live. 85 is much more likely, the milk carton has a "sell by" date on it.
And then of course, by that age you might write off the boat (hell, pleasure sailing could be illegal by then, Social Security and Medicare could be universal, or broke, either way) and make a vague guess at what accommodations back on land will cost you. If you buy a property and long-term lease it, at least you can come back to it. But then again, you've got to worry about tenants and property managers and upkeep as well. In the long term, with all the expenses, skyrocketing property values often just reflect inflation.
A yellow legal pad, or a steno pad, where you can write down questions and considerations, can help.
I like the way you think Hellosailor!
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Old 17-05-2016, 14:54   #14
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

I've seen too many people struck down with health issues to worry about it. My successful uncle got MS at 57 died at 63. My father-in-law had a stroke 12 years ago, nursing home ever since. Even the people we are buying the boat from, planned a 3 year Pacific trip and had to sell due to cancer.

We are actually doing the opposite, we are buying a boat NOW, living on it, learning to sail AND still working for another 7 years. Side trips will all we get for a bit. But I'd rather do that than to wait another 7 years to get out of Ohio.

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Old 17-05-2016, 16:11   #15
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Re: Liveaboard cruiser to be and retirement

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We also have the mindset that "now" is the only way to go. As we age our bodies may not be in sync with our brains. I don't want to forgo dreams and plans because we waited too late. We can no longer fool ourselves that there is "always tomorrow".
That is the most important aspect of your planning. The recognition that today is for real but tomorrow is just a dream.

In 1990 I met a 72-year old couple in Seattle who had just completed a 10-year circumnavigation. This was before GPS, watermakers, and EPIRBs. I spent quite a bit of time talking with them. There only regret was waiting until retirement at age 62.

They told me they felt great when they left Seattle but 8-years later their bodies were wearing out and they were tired of the constant aches and pains. They had returned to Seattle because they still loved to sail but their bodies just were not up to the task any longer.

I am now going on age 69 and am still very active. We bicycle 20 to 30 miles a day most days of the week. We walk many miles a day. I do a lot of boat maintenance (she is 22-years old). And I hurt all over, I ache, I get stiff despite three stretching sessions a day.

Ten years ago I was still a serious jock and in fantastic shape. Five years ago I was still a good athlete and could keep up with mountain bike riders half my age.

Two years ago my heart started having arrythmias and now is not so dependable. Last year my knees starting aching even when riding my bicycle slowly on level ground. Raising the main is a serious effort now and winding in the genoa is a project for my twice broken shoulder.

My wife, who is an even better athlete than I, broke her shoulder and arm in a bicycle accident two years ago (age 58) and that arm and hand are barely functional now. She can not do most of the things required of a sailor. And, due to the plates in her shoulder and arm is afraid to ride serious single track mountain bike trails.

The same thing happened to my skiing, climbing, hiking, sailing companion since 1966. He can no longer ride a bicycle due to a failed knee replacement and his shoulders are now failing.

I've always stayed in great shape and have exercised vigorously all my life but time does catch up. At this point my wife and I seriously question the wisdom, or safety, of embarking on another full time cruise in remote waters.

Enjoy your life and world while you have the physical ability.
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