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Old 16-12-2013, 07:26   #16
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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I'm the author. Many thanks for your kind words.

The 4th Edition of THE ANNAPOLIS BOOK OF SEAMANSHIP will be available in early January, 2014. Over 1/3 of it is new or heavily revised, with Mark Smith's superb illustrations remaining. A summary of changes, as well as my biography and others' comments about the book, may be found at the book's page at Amazon.com (look for "Forums").

Amazon.com: The Annapolis Book of Seamanship: Fourth Edition eBook: John Rousmaniere, Mark Smith: Kindle Store
Good for you, John. We met at a 2010 Safety at Sea seminar and I was impressed then by your knowledge and ability to tactfully deal with silly sailor questions.

If anyone's interested, I reviewed two other works of Mr. Rousmaniere at my sea book blog here:

Volumes of Salt: A slightly morbid treasury for reluctant sailors

and his famous post-race analysis of the Fastnet disaster in '79 here:

Volumes of Salt: One from the history books

It's safe to say I'm a fan.
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Old 16-12-2013, 07:28   #17
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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Still around! I've been especially busy with reviews of accidents and other safety-related activities.
I wonder in light of that what your thoughts would be on this thread, which is slightly critical of the Salty Dawg Rally:

Atlantic Sailboat Rallies Are Not A Good Idea In The Fall

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Old 16-12-2013, 08:52   #18
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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How much is it a book about sailing vs cruising independent of propulsion source? I don't sail anymore, but cruise a lot in a trawler. Is this still applicable?
The lengthy, well-illustrated rules of the road chapter applies to all boats, as do the four chapters on navigation and the chapters on health concerns, electronics, communications, anchoring, flag etiquette, safety, weather, and crewoverboard rescue and other emergencies. The sections on boathandling under power are directed at auxiliaries. The heavy weather chapter has a lot on storm prediction and management that applies broadly. JR
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Old 16-12-2013, 09:03   #19
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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As I recall, maybe half of the content is sailing oriented. But there's a lot of useful practical information on weather, navigation, rules of the road, leadership, etc. that's equally applicable to power boat cruising.

Let me add that while ANNAPOLIS has plenty of details on skills and equipment, it's also about seamanship as a concept and state of mind -- all those disciplines and organizing skills that make a difference no matter what boat you're in. To appreciate what I mean, take a look at an article I wrote based on the book's forward. It's on the Cruising Club of America website at http://www.cruisingclub.org/pdfs/sas...ousmaniere.pdf
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Old 16-12-2013, 09:22   #20
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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Good for you, John. We met at a 2010 Safety at Sea seminar and I was impressed then by your knowledge and ability to tactfully deal with silly sailor questions.

If anyone's interested, I reviewed two other works of Mr. Rousmaniere at my sea book blog here:

Volumes of Salt: A slightly morbid treasury for reluctant sailors

and his famous post-race analysis of the Fastnet disaster in '79 here:

Volumes of Salt: One from the history books

It's safe to say I'm a fan.

Thanks for these very thoughtful discussions. I saw the first, about AFTER THE STORM, a couple of years ago. I'm glad that FASTNET, FORCE 10 holds up. I was criticized at the time for not being more judgmental. My conviction was (and remains) that if the narrative is presented properly, readers will make up their own minds and go on to make improvements. That's been the case with the recent accident reviews that I and others have done for US Sailing and the Newport Bermuda Race. This new edition of ANNAPOLIS was delayed to take all that into account.
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Old 16-12-2013, 15:39   #21
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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Thanks for these very thoughtful discussions. I saw the first, about AFTER THE STORM, a couple of years ago. I'm glad that FASTNET, FORCE 10 holds up. I was criticized at the time for not being more judgmental. My conviction was (and remains) that if the narrative is presented properly, readers will make up their own minds and go on to make improvements. That's been the case with the recent accident reviews that I and others have done for US Sailing and the Newport Bermuda Race. This new edition of ANNAPOLIS was delayed to take all that into account.
While I agree that it does no good to shame sailors into achieving higher levels of seamanship, or perhaps it's just a case of "you can't teach prudence", but I do find that in the case of rallies in recent years, there seems to be every electronic advantage, but fewer of the basic seamanship skills that keep you on a damaged if sailable vessel.

In a nutshell, since the introduction of the big red button, there's more hitting of the big red button. I have to wonder if the increase in forecasting accuracy, radar, and so on have allowed the most recent generation of sailors to avoid instructive bad weather to the point of being surprised at the ferocity of the sea. If you didn't know with confidence more than the first 36 hours' forecast of a rally, you had to expect on getting plastered by gales, contrary currents and so on. You had to plan accordingly.

I am not always seeing that level of preparedness or rather anticipation. I am seeing more people winched off boats that are not sinking, but might be merely uncomfortable or have taken a wave below.
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Old 17-12-2013, 08:00   #22
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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I wonder in light of that what your thoughts would be on this thread, which is slightly critical of the Salty Dawg Rally:

Atlantic Sailboat Rallies Are Not A Good Idea In The Fall

I don't know enough about it just yet to have an opinion except to refer to the obvious points about banishing complacency and stressing the fundamental responsibility of the captain.

After a series of accidents in 2011 and early 2012, a sailor asked this question: “How does the average sailor get enough experience to be safe at sea?” In reply, my friend Brad Avery, of the Orange Coast College School of Sailing and Seamanship in Newport Beach, Cal., said that the premise was mistaken. The fact is, he wrote, “We are never safe at sea, whether we are professionals or amateurs. We are always one bad decision away from disaster.” Avery (who has sailed many tens of thousands of miles) continued, “My goal is to sail error-free on each cruise or race, but I know this is impossible to achieve. The quest for a voyage free of mistakes goes on. Time on the water, training, humility, and constant vigilance are the keys to being ‘safer.’ Knowing you're never safe also helps.”
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Old 17-12-2013, 16:52   #23
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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I don't know enough about it just yet to have an opinion except to refer to the obvious points about banishing complacency and stressing the fundamental responsibility of the captain.

After a series of accidents in 2011 and early 2012, a sailor asked this question: “How does the average sailor get enough experience to be safe at sea?” In reply, my friend Brad Avery, of the Orange Coast College School of Sailing and Seamanship in Newport Beach, Cal., said that the premise was mistaken. The fact is, he wrote, “We are never safe at sea, whether we are professionals or amateurs. We are always one bad decision away from disaster.” Avery (who has sailed many tens of thousands of miles) continued, “My goal is to sail error-free on each cruise or race, but I know this is impossible to achieve. The quest for a voyage free of mistakes goes on. Time on the water, training, humility, and constant vigilance are the keys to being ‘safer.’ Knowing you're never safe also helps.”
Well, I can't argue with that, nor would I want to. I'm actually one of those guys who is comforted by the utter indifference to my continued existence regularly shown by the sea. At least you know where you stand.

I dunno, though: Some sailors these days seem a touch hubristic, as if more gear and more dollars will discourage that 30 foot rogue coming at them out of the dark. That's my impression, anyway. Luckily, I have to improve my seamanship the old-fashioned way: via more sailing. I don't have the money to plaster the helm with "Star Trek".
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Old 17-12-2013, 19:33   #24
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

Hi john (Evans here),

Congrats on getting the book revision out . . . That's a major accomplishment.

As I commented to Ron T about the salty dog, and many prior cruising rally's, the incident rate suggests there is a yet unmet opportunity to help these sort of (cruising) sailors understand that safety is a state of mind - exactly the sort of humble, open and learning, but tough, determined and self-reliant, state of mind that brad suggests.

Hopefully your writing and speaking can/will reach this cruising/rally group.
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Old 18-12-2013, 08:04   #25
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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Hi john (Evans here),

Congrats on getting the book revision out . . . That's a major accomplishment.

As I commented to Ron T about the salty dog, and many prior cruising rally's, the incident rate suggests there is a yet unmet opportunity to help these sort of (cruising) sailors understand that safety is a state of mind - exactly the sort of humble, open and learning, but tough, determined and self-reliant, state of mind that brad suggests.

Hopefully your writing and speaking can/will reach this cruising/rally group.
That's the spirit in which I made my comments. When I attended John R.'s "Safety at Sea" seminar in 2010, there was very little I heard that I didn't already know...although I'd never been present at a liferaft inflation! But spending the day hearing all these topics covered in a concentrated fashion really "fixed" the safety points in my mind, or so I would like to assume.

I suspect that as a well-regarded reference book one sees aboard a large number of pleasure craft, the new "Annapolis 4th" will provide the same measure of concentration, and, it's hoped, education.

Because whatever's going on lately seems to be working less well than in the past.
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Old 18-12-2013, 08:50   #26
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

Safety seminars do concentrate the mind. There will be a very good and innovative one at Newport, RI, March 15-16. Description and signup are atThe Newport Bermuda Race | June 20, 2014
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Old 18-12-2013, 08:52   #27
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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I suspect that as a well-regarded reference book one sees aboard a large number of pleasure craft, the new "Annapolis 4th" will provide the same measure of concentration, and, it's hoped, education.

Yes, however, unfortunately, book reading is a rapidly declining pastime.

Because whatever's going on lately seems to be working less well than in the past.

I would love to see someone undertake a detailed investigation of say the past 10 "fall, going south" cruising incidents. We know so much about the racing incidents because of the investigations, but so little about the whys of the cruising incidents. I suspect, but don't know, that the cruising incidents are fundamentally different than the racing ones. I do know our own serious mistakes have been fundamentally different than the racing incidents, but also probably quite different from the "fall, going south" ones (because our experience level leads us to different mistakes than the newer cruisers).

But, it would be a ton of work to do a good report, and you might not be given access or the truth (for insurance/liability reasons), and would have to do it "for the love of the sport" - because there would be no money in it AND because various people would end up mad at you (I unfortunately know that first hand).

Anyway . . . I give great credit to john for bring dedicated to, and ably serving, the sport during his "career".


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Old 18-12-2013, 09:11   #28
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

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I would love to see someone undertake a detailed investigation of say the past 10 "fall, going south" cruising incidents. We know so much about the racing incidents because of the investigations, but so little about the whys of the cruising incidents. I suspect, but don't know, that the cruising incidents are fundamentally different than the racing ones.
If you and/or John want to take this project on, I will start the Kickstarter to fund it
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Old 18-12-2013, 09:58   #29
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Re: dun dun dun: 4th edition of annapolis book of seamanship

^^ perhaps John will take you up on that.

I did this for a living at McKinesy and GE, and I have enjoyed and personally learned from the USCG investigation panels I have been involved in . . . but I have sworn off 'amateur' panels. There is too much ego and option involved. People who were friends get mad at me when I point out the data/facts suggests they are wrong. And I hate either outcome . . . having a report with my name on it that is "factually incorrect" or losing friends over it. Solo reports are also no solution, because none of us knows everything.
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