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Old 28-05-2012, 10:12   #31
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Re: Do you use nautical terms or plain language.

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Originally Posted by boden36 View Post
I try to use the more common nautical terms as they are specific to the situation. If the crew is half way interested they will learn them, if not , look for better crew.
In an emergency, the ability to be precise and understood will give you a major safety edge.
Regards,
Richard.
This is exactly what I do and why I do it. There are many situations where you cannot leave your station and you need as little ambiguity as possible to avoid damage or danger to the crew.

Useful crew are crew that know the names of the parts of the boat, and the specific "nautical" language that allows the right line (not rope, cord, string, guy or hawser) to be pulled or eased when necessary.

A boat is a moving object in space and time. Positional language, in concert with descriptive naming conventions based on functions rather than construction (or why a bunch of similar ropes can be halyards, sheets, guys, rodes, lines, downhauls, outhauls and so on) is important to know and to use correctly.

I do not expect those new to crewing to be entirely conversant in all the nautical terms, particularly the more antique or obscure ones (I asked one crew once to alert me to "come on deck when that bell buoy moves from abaft to abeam relative to the daymark" or some such precise if potentially baffling instruction). I am happy to teach those willing and capable of learning, and I have frequently found that those not particularly gifted in map reading, navigation or spatial orientation can quickly appreciate the very particular place indicated by phrases such as "coil down the port forward hawser off the bollard onto deck and stow the fenders in the lazarette. Then go below for a beer from the reefer."

And yes, I have been known to use the more common terms like "aft" and "forward" when giving land-based directions. Old habits!
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Old 28-05-2012, 10:15   #32
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Re: Do you use Nautical Terms or Plain Language?

RELEASE THE JIB SHEET!!!
Uh...what?
THE JIB SHEET!!...THAT LINE RIGHT THERE!!
Line?
THE ROPE YOU'RE STANDING ON!!
This one?

bang boom skew knockdown

Yea, that one


mm
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Old 28-05-2012, 10:23   #33
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Re: Do you use Nautical Terms or Plain Language?

I don't take out non-boaters in any kind of challenging weather because of stuff like that. I am happy, however, in eight to ten knots of apparent wind to let them fool around with most of the lines and the helm. The ones with a knack get further instructions.

I will admit, however, that some people, for reasons unclear to me, feel that the language is either unnecessary and/or exclusionary.

They are misguided.
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Old 28-05-2012, 11:40   #34
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Re: Do you use Nautical Terms or Plain Language?

++1 on the use of nautical terms for precision of meaning and clarity and compactness of instruction.

Then again I started sailing by racing keel yachts 25 - 45 feet long. When things need to be done then need to be done right now and right.
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Old 28-05-2012, 12:30   #35
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Re: Do you use Nautical Terms or Plain Language?

Nautical terms ARE plain language. Used in a marine environment, they leave nothing to interpret... on a subway, not so much! Capt Phil
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Old 28-05-2012, 13:02   #36
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Re: Do you use Nautical Terms or Plain Language?

I always use naughty language, aboard or afoot.
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Old 28-05-2012, 13:30   #37
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Re: Do you use nautical terms or plain language.

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Originally Posted by Wotname View Post
Any occupation has its own language, usually for a good reason. Sure, some try to use speciality words in such a way to be mysterious or exclusive or just to be a tosser.

I use mostly nautical terms unless I am speaking with someone who doesn't know them. If they are interested, I will explain otherwise I will use non-nautical descriptors and watch carefully to see that they understand. I don't get spiffy about either way and there is plenty of rope aboard my boat (or should that be "plenty of rope on my floating home").

The purpose of correctly using common nautical terms like mast, sail, sheet, halyard, anchor, rudder, keel, deck, tiller, bow, stern, port, starboard, spinnaker, aboard and so on just seems to be so obvious, why won't one use them.

However, YMMV
any occupation has its own language(mine is hangliding)..When towing a person aloft to 2000 agl on a winch you will want to make sure everybody understands each other..for instance never use the word "go" as it sounds to much like "no" ..instead, use the word accelerate,that way if the person is not wanting to be towed any higher and says "no" I dont confuse it with "Go" which would put that person flying into a precarious position,going up when he didnt want to..same with the boat,understand the languge and less mistakes ,after all there are so many different "ropes " on board,if its a halyard and you know it you will not be pulling on the main sheet when told to do something helpful ...DVC
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Old 28-05-2012, 16:45   #38
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Re: Do you use Nautical Terms or Plain Language?

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It depends.............
Neither term is intuitive. The standards I teach use "bear away" rather than "fall off", which on the water could have unintended consequences.
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Originally Posted by tager View Post
I always use naughty language, aboard or afoot.
Interesting in the way that words written can be much clearer to understand than words spoken!
For some of my friends "bear away" would be intuitively heard as "bare away" yet (perhaps?) in Canada, it might be heard as "bear that-away" .
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Old 28-05-2012, 17:03   #39
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Re: Do you use nautical terms or plain language.

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Originally Posted by S/V Alchemy View Post
This is exactly what I do and why I do it. There are many situations where you cannot leave your station and you need as little ambiguity as possible to avoid damage or danger to the crew.

Useful crew are crew that know the names of the parts of the boat, and the specific "nautical" language that allows the right line (not rope, cord, string, guy or hawser) to be pulled or eased when necessary.

A boat is a moving object in space and time. Positional language, in concert with descriptive naming conventions based on functions rather than construction (or why a bunch of similar ropes can be halyards, sheets, guys, rodes, lines, downhauls, outhauls and so on) is important to know and to use correctly.

I do not expect those new to crewing to be entirely conversant in all the nautical terms, particularly the more antique or obscure ones (I asked one crew once to alert me to "come on deck when that bell buoy moves from abaft to abeam relative to the daymark" or some such precise if potentially baffling instruction). I am happy to teach those willing and capable of learning, and I have frequently found that those not particularly gifted in map reading, navigation or spatial orientation can quickly appreciate the very particular place indicated by phrases such as "coil down the port forward hawser off the bollard onto deck and stow the fenders in the lazarette. Then go below for a beer from the reefer."

And yes, I have been known to use the more common terms like "aft" and "forward" when giving land-based directions. Old habits!
Alchemy.....you gave me a chuckle with this one for sure! As a fairly new sailor, even as our boats skipper, I stumble on my terms every now and then. But it appears that 'all the nautical terms' aren't as important to you as is the basic knowledge of quantum physics!

We should probably not sail together.....he he!
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Old 28-05-2012, 17:05   #40
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Re: Do you use Nautical Terms or Plain Language?

I love going aboard a boat to help crew and correcting the captain every time he or she utters things like "bumpers" instead of "fenders" and "rope" instead of "line" I really like it when he or she says "sidestays." If you are the Captain, you'd better know what you're talking about and make it very clear to whoever your crew happens to be. Safety first you know.
kind regards,
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Old 28-05-2012, 17:09   #41
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Re: Do you use nautical terms or plain language.

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Originally Posted by S/V Alchemy View Post
..............

A boat is a moving object in space and time. .............!
Perhaps true but I prefer Richard Bach's description, "a sailboat moves though time; an airplne moves through space".

At least I think it was his quote but memory can play tricks...........
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Old 28-05-2012, 17:48   #42
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Re: Do you use Nautical Terms or Plain Language?

Nautical terms are useful when they pertain to an object.

Left and right are fine as replacements for port and starboard. You know what people do when you tell them port? They translate it to left in their mind, (oh yeah, port and left have the same number of letters, so port is left). Most if not all people with an iq over 90, will understand the left side of the boat stays the left side of the boat, regardless of where you are looking.

Can anyone tell me why we should be saying Munsill, Hudsill, or Stassill?
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Old 28-05-2012, 17:50   #43
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Re: Do you use Nautical Terms or Plain Language?

go to the pointy end and pick up the ropey thing and bring it back here to me using the pathway markerthingies you find along the side of the boat-- there should be some on each side--- btw--there is a separate ropey thing for each side of he boat--and same pathway on each side of the boat--- and when you are done, please make a knot in the end of the ropey thingie about one foot from its end.....when the 2 ropey thingies are here, then we will pull on one of them to bring out the little bit of cloth at the pointy end so we have a sail. you get to make sure the ropy thing keeps the sail full. now , whatever you do , dont let it luff.......

HUH?????

thenye can pull on this rope and make this big cloth come up -- make sure you pull it all the way up.....

if ye have to speak like that to a potential crew--y0u do not want that crew on boat. i dont have to leave my flat end of my boat to check on my iggurunt crew at the pointy end--so they best be smarter than this. someone gotta sail the sukker. they are obviously not the right choice. we go for long passages at sea--there is no room for those who dont know what to do or how to do it.
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Old 28-05-2012, 18:44   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiprJohn
I love going aboard a boat to help crew and correcting the captain every time he or she utters things like "bumpers" instead of "fenders" and "rope" instead of "line" I really like it when he or she says "sidestays." If you are the Captain, you'd better know what you're talking about and make it very clear to whoever your crew happens to be. Safety first you know.
kind regards,
I bet that makes you popular with the Skipper - LOL

Like most of us I use both in context of target audience.

If after one day on the boat and the newbie indicates they want to come back and "try" this sailling thing some more, I recommend a beginner book to be read before next outing. This is so they can learn some basics out of my sight and ask some more relevant and intelligent questions.

I used to loan out my beginner books, now they are all gone...
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Old 28-05-2012, 18:51   #45
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Re: Do you use Nautical Terms or Plain Language?

I have to admit that I use the term "Head" almost always. Just today I asked a waitress where the head was. She knew exactly what I wanted to know. On the other hand I'm building a canoe with a buddy of mine. We refer to the "Pointy End" and "The Other Pointy End".
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