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Old 19-01-2015, 16:59   #46
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

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Originally Posted by reduc View Post
Thanks for this thread, I like to hear differing opinions and expect folks won't agree on everything...

I'm in Boston, planning a broadly similar trip this year - except that I don't yet have the boat. I'm currently looking at the CS36 T - a number are available around Lake Ontario. I am hoping to find one early this year and sail it around for a month or two figuring out what might need immediate attention that a survey might have missed. After that the St Lawrence Seaway and down the east coast (with a multi month stop in PEI to visit my GF). I hoping getting CG documentation wont take too long, if so this trip might get delayed, but I can be flexible. Anyone have ideas about how long that might take?

A number of people have suggested 'Tools' - I'm curious outside of the obvious what is included in this category? Maybe a better question - what tools have you found extremely useful that were unexpected?
What I call a "spanner" wrench ..In England I dont belive it is the same spanner wrench that I am inferencing ..The one i am referring to is a flat wrench with an off set opening and a sort of tooth or hook that catches the "spanner nut"(not a regular crown type nut) and loosens it..Had such a nut on my Yanmar 20 gfw but no wrench..When I contacted Yanmar they said it was standerd w/ the tool kit that came with engine purchase..
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Old 19-01-2015, 19:04   #47
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

While most people can learn how to get into a dinghy from the water, some may require a rigid boarding ladder of some sort.
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Old 20-01-2015, 05:44   #48
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

Added boarding ladder to my list in general.

I'm thought of this before, but with my dinghy hanging on its' davits it wouldn't be easy to get back on the boat from the water if someone went over the side. Which also means that when I'm on my mooring maybe I should have some type of ladder hanging because who hasn't gone outside in the middle of the night to fix a banging line etc.
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Old 20-01-2015, 06:27   #49
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Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

When we took off for the western caribe we invested in a small watermaker. This came about based on our other trips there. While not absolutely necessary, it's small output meant we never needed to worry about drinking water. I am a fan of drinking water, I am not a fan of foul tasting (all too common) water or large plastic jugs of water.
Expensive......yes, but worth every penny!

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Old 20-01-2015, 06:34   #50
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

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Originally Posted by sailorboy1 View Post
Added boarding ladder to my list in general.

I'm thought of this before, but with my dinghy hanging on its' davits it wouldn't be easy to get back on the boat from the water if someone went over the side. Which also means that when I'm on my mooring maybe I should have some type of ladder hanging because who hasn't gone outside in the middle of the night to fix a banging line etc.
We installed one of these a few years ago. One of the best additions we've made. We use it as our general boarding ladder, but also as our emergency ladder that can be accessed by someone floating in the water.

Not cheap, but well worth it: Up-N-Out Marine Ladders - Boat Ladder Models
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Old 20-01-2015, 07:01   #51
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

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Originally Posted by Mike OReilly View Post
We installed one of these a few years ago. One of the best additions we've made. We use it as our general boarding ladder, but also as our emergency ladder that can be accessed by someone floating in the water.

Not cheap, but well worth it: Up-N-Out Marine Ladders - Boat Ladder Models
This or something similar might be our next addition. Nancie and I were discussing this problem this morning. We are well prepared to reboard with one of us assisting with boarding equipment on deck, but we lack the ability on our own from the water when our dinghy is up.

I have a stainless boarding ladder that I constructed that I sometimes deploy at anchor when we are kayaking, but it's bulky, heavy, awkward and not folding. I remember forty years ago when I could kick out of the water with a one-handed pull on my anchor chain snubber, grasp my bow pulpit and vault to the bow. Those days are long gone!

Thanks for the idea!
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Old 20-01-2015, 07:07   #52
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailorboy1 View Post
Added boarding ladder to my list in general.

I'm thought of this before, but with my dinghy hanging on its' davits it wouldn't be easy to get back on the boat from the water if someone went over the side. Which also means that when I'm on my mooring maybe I should have some type of ladder hanging because who hasn't gone outside in the middle of the night to fix a banging line etc.
I think Ann was referring to a boarding ladder for the dinghy. It can be real difficult boarding a dinghy - especially when tired or in rough conditions.

Doesn't your Hunter have a sugar scoop right to the water with a boarding ladder on it? Or did you mean your dinghy blocks access to this?

Mark
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Old 20-01-2015, 08:01   #53
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

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Originally Posted by Hudson Force View Post
This or something similar might be our next addition. Nancie and I were discussing this problem this morning. We are well prepared to reboard with one of us assisting with boarding equipment on deck, but we lack the ability on our own from the water when our dinghy is up.

I have a stainless boarding ladder that I constructed that I sometimes deploy at anchor when we are kayaking, but it's bulky, heavy, awkward and not folding. I remember forty years ago when I could kick out of the water with a one-handed pull on my anchor chain snubber, grasp my bow pulpit and vault to the bow. Those days are long gone!

Thanks for the idea!
For boats without a sugar scoop or similar transom, or simply a high freeboard, I rate an emergency boarding ladder as essential. Especially when you're alone...

Plastimo and other vendors offer emergency rescue ladders, but it's something that's very easy to fabricate yourself for far less $... The rungs on the setup I put together are cut from ordinary electrical conduit material covered with non-skid strips, the bottom one weighted so it will sink when deployed, and the ladder will hang vertically... The trip line dangling over the side, reachable by a swimmer, will release it from a storage bag closed with velcro. Make it longer than you might think is necessary, the lowest step on some of these ladders seems too 'shallow' to me, a deeper ladder will make it far easier to use...

It can still be surprisingly difficult to clamber back aboard using something like this, but when the adrenaline is flowing, at least it gives you a fighting chance... :-)




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Old 20-01-2015, 08:08   #54
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

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Originally Posted by Jon Eisberg View Post
For boats without a sugar scoop or similar transom, or simply a high freeboard, I rate an emergency boarding ladder as essential. Especially when you're alone...

Plastimo and other vendors offer emergency rescue ladders, but it's something that's very easy to fabricate yourself for far less $... The rungs on the setup I put together are cut from ordinary electrical conduit material covered with non-skid strips, the bottom one weighted so it will sink when deployed, and the ladder will hang vertically... The trip line dangling over the side, reachable by a swimmer, will release it from a storage bag closed with velcro. Make it longer than you might think is necessary, the lowest step on some of these ladders seems too 'shallow' to me, a deeper ladder will make it far easier to use...

It can still be surprisingly difficult to clamber back aboard using something like this, but when the adrenaline is flowing, at least it gives you a fighting chance... :-)



Excellent information and well presented. Thank you
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Old 20-01-2015, 08:20   #55
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

Assuming you are starting on the ICW, leave earlier and take your time. If you miss something, stop and add it. There are plenty of places to stop and add pieces and parts relatively easily. If you don't miss it, don't worry about it.

If you feel something is neccessary for safety, get it before you leave.

Way too many people spend years and thousands of dollars on the perfect cruising boat only to never leave the dock.
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Old 20-01-2015, 08:25   #56
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Eisberg View Post
.....................

Plastimo and other vendors offer emergency rescue ladders, but it's something that's very easy to fabricate yourself for far less $... The rungs on the setup I put together are cut from ordinary electrical conduit material covered with non-skid strips, the bottom one weighted so it will sink when deployed, and the ladder will hang vertically... The trip line dangling over the side, reachable by a swimmer, will release it from a storage bag closed with velcro. Make it longer than you might think is necessary, the lowest step on some of these ladders seems too 'shallow' to me, a deeper ladder will make it far easier to use...

It can still be surprisingly difficult to clamber back aboard using something like this, but when the adrenaline is flowing, at least it gives you a fighting chance... :-) ....................
Ah, but there's the "fighting chance" variable! Sadly, the rope ladders are far from suitable for us. As cruisers since 1971 our age is decreasing our agility. My need would not only be the in water deployable ladder, but a rigid structure with minimal intervals between rungs.

Nancie has effects from post polio syndrome that cause me to make every
effort to extend our cruising time with specific attention to steps, stairs and ladders,- though your solution would excel for many!
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Old 20-01-2015, 10:47   #57
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

I have found it almost impossible to board any boat, including dinghies, with rope ladders. It can be done but you have to be very athletic. The problem is, other than the strength necessary to step up, is that the ladder rungs try to go away from you towards the keel so that you can only use your arms to pull yourself up. Most people cannot do this. Heck my wife and I struggled to get a 50 pound wahoo up over the stern one time, working together.

If the boat is under way you will have an even harder time using a rope ladder as it will not stay in a vertical position. If the boat is stopped and you have a vertical hull from about two feet underwater (or more) you have a decent chance of getting up if you can't do a pull up with your arms alone.

As far as going overboard underway when the crew can't notice you doing it, we basically came to the conclusion that you probably would not make it unless you had a position signalling device and floatation gear, or be very, very lucky. Training a floating line off the stern might help but you also might just be drug around until you drowned like a fish on a line you don't notice. Not to be too pessimistic but life is not always 100% safe.

If the crew does notice and you can be found, our primary plan was to throw floatation as needed and use a halyard to winch the person on board if we did not have a fixed boarding ladder (we do). Our "fixed" boarding ladder does hinge about halfway down so it too is extremely difficult to use as the hinged part wants to go under the hull too. A fixed boarding ladder is a useful thing to have though if you have funds and a place to store it on deck. I use a homemade single step that hangs over the side to use at low docks and with the dink. Very handy and takes almost not room.
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Old 20-01-2015, 10:50   #58
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

Also, I made a stupid and disrespectful post (#23) regarding the OP. I followed this up with a better reply later but the first was inexcusable. My apologies to the OP as his issue was sincere and exactly the type of issue that is meant to be commented on on this blog.
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Old 20-01-2015, 11:13   #59
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

A big advantage for transoms with steps that come down to the water line. Common on most newer catamarans and occasionally seen on monohulls.

Assuming I can get to the transom, I can pull the ladder down from the water and then I have solid steps available to climb up on. Not a guarantee but much better odds than a rope ladder.
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Old 20-01-2015, 11:28   #60
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Re: Coastal cruising equipment and accessories

Based on how you asked the question, I would say accessories and a first mate. I have sailed in the area's you are talking about and mosquito netting and spray is a must. A good friend also in the same area had the unfortunate luck to find a missing shipping container just under the surface. Good thing he had a patch that would seal under water to keep his baby afloat.
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