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Old 09-01-2016, 20:22   #1
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Close One for this Sailor

Montreal sailor recounts U.S. navy rescue at sea off Bahamas - Montreal - CBC News

Montreal sailor recounts U.S. navy rescue at sea off Bahamas
Éric Valois overcomes pirates from Haiti, punctured hull and gale-force winds, rescued just as sailboat sinks

CBC News Posted: Jan 08, 2016 8:06 AM ET Last Updated: Jan 08, 2016 1:17 PM ET

Some seriously lame 'mariners' out and about in those waters!

Distress call
For five days, without a sail nor a working engine, the sailor fought to keep the pumps working and his boat afloat, but fatigue eventually set in.
By then adrift in high seas, Valois sent out a number of distress calls and prepared to abandon his sinking sailboat for a life raft.
"I don't think my chances of survival were very good if I had abandoned the sailboat," he said.
A number of boats in the area ignored his distress call — despite maritime laws that oblige them to help, Valois said.

NOT THE 'HIGH SEAS' I RECALL SAILING ON! Folks may have to re-think their'rescue plans' to being 'self rescue plans'.

Poster in comments> mercyisland
It's a bit misunderstood that this rescue was carried out by US Merchant Mariners
who are contracted to do work for the US Navy, but are civilians. They are overlooked
all too often for the work they do worldwide. In recognition of the need for full disclosure,
my husband is the captain of the USNS Pathfinder. He and the crew considered the Christmas Eve mission a lasting miracle that gave meaning to a Christmas at Sea, out of contact and far away from their families. It was a blessing all the way around.

This explains the non anwsered Distress Call> Deck Dog
The boats probably ignored his distress calls because that is a tactic used by pirates. They send out a false distress call and then attack to would be rescuers. Somali pirates did the same thing in the Indian ocean as a result ships tended to ignore any distress calls or reported them to the military to handle.
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Old 10-01-2016, 10:34   #2
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Re: Close One for this Sailor

It was interesting to read the comments on the article. The majority thanked their "friends to the south" for their generous assistance. It's a shame more people around the world don't acknowledge the lives lost and money spent to help them in life threatening emergencies.
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Old 10-01-2016, 13:10   #3
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Re: Close One for this Sailor

People sometimes react very weirdly to being rescued. People will complain, "WTF took you so long!" rather than "Thank you so very much!" Friend who flew SAR for the Canadian Air Force said the weird, ungrateful reaction is common. He seemed to think it was due to the stress the one's being rescued felt.

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Old 11-01-2016, 11:02   #4
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Re: Close One for this Sailor

Great post Clamdigger!
Isn't it interesting that Haitian pirates attempted to steal his sailboat in the friendly, placid waters of the Bahamas where many CF members believe the theft of even dinghies would never occur . . . let alone a sailboat? "Who would ever steal a sailboat," some CF members chortled in the discussion on "Tragedy Strikes"? "There's only been one to date . . . and that happened in the States . . .but, never in the Bahamas! They just don't steal sailboats . . . they steal "go fast" power boats!" And, to add insult to injury, many attempts for assistance via radio were made by this experienced sailor in distress via radio and no one answered his calls? Could this really be true in the Bahamian paradise of Kumbaya? And, perhaps our CF member, Gil, was a successful victim of Haitian thieves while ashore rather than CF's definitive group consensus of losing his anchor and his vessel drifting into the unknown. There has been no credible sighting of his vessel to date. As a final remark, there are some in life who see everything through rose-colored glasses. They have been reared in comfortable suburban homes, in quiet, crime-free neighborhoods with good, decent parents who loved them and wanted them to have a safe and secure upbringing. However, there is a real world that exists outside of this suburban/rural utopia and comprises a large percentage of our planet where the rules are different and survival of the fittest and power and might rule. Fortunately, all is well for this lucky sailor but there is a lesson to be learned: everything in life changes. Good luck and safe sailing.
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Old 11-01-2016, 14:34   #5
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Re: Close One for this Sailor

You really need a geography lesson, or at least a glance at a chart. Conflating where that boat was boarded by Haitians (near the T&C's) with a similar assumption at West End is like assuming a robbery occuring in Charleston SC was perpetuated by a wanted Miami thief who managed to evade numerous road blocks to get there.

The West End boat was NOT abducted by Haitians using any reasonably probable logic process.

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Old 11-01-2016, 16:43   #6
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Re: Close One for this Sailor

Quote:
Originally Posted by colemj View Post
You really need a geography lesson, or at least a glance at a chart. Conflating where that boat was boarded by Haitians (near the T&C's) with a similar assumption at West End is like assuming a robbery occuring in Charleston SC was perpetuated by a wanted Miami thief who managed to evade numerous road blocks to get there.

The West End boat was NOT abducted by Haitians using any reasonably probable logic process.

Mark
Mark,
Did I miss something in the news story? I didn't see any mention of the Turks and Caicos. Can you point out where they were mentioned in the article? And, after looking at the map included in the CBC Montreal report, I did see that the boat transited the Windward Passage and then sailed/drifted(?) past Inagua and Acklins/Crooked Island group in the Bahamas. Are these still part of the Bahamas or are they now part of the Turks and Caicos? When were they admitted into the Bahamas? But, let's forget the obvious errors or mis-statements you have made and using your logic(?), the only valid example that you would accept as a mention of piracy in the Bahamas is if a potential piracy happened in exactly the same location as Gil's boat (anchored off Grand Bahama) since anywhere else in the Bahamas, according to your analogy, would not be the same thing. But, the reporter never mentioned exactly where this theft was attempted but the title of the news story was: "Montreal Sailor Recounts US Navy's Rescue at Sea off Bahamas" with a sub-title that followed: "Pirates and a Broken Mast." So, if one were to use logic and reason based upon what was written in the CBC article, would a reasonable person assume that the dismasting and attempted theft of his boat occurred in the Bahamas or as you say, the Turks and Caicos? And, in my earlier remarks in the discussion "Tragedy Strikes," I responded to those on CF who denied that any boat thefts, including dinghies, were possible in the Bahamas. Why is this such an inconceivable notion? Theft occurs everywhere in the world and the Bahamas are no exception. If there was an error, it was an error of unclear reporting and not a reasonable person's(yes, that's me, Mark) reading of the news story. Perhaps you can explain your logic in light of your above statements.
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