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Old 19-05-2009, 00:12   #16
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Aloha Newt,

Hi Jiffy, I didn't say, "jump out there and do it." I recommended a thread, a link and a book. I also recommend the public library for a good place to read up on navigation and what it takes to cruise.

Kind regards,

JohnL
I understood your intentions Skipr, I was just throwing in my two cents worth too.
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Old 19-05-2009, 00:15   #17
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Well i don't have 30k yet that is just what i know i can make in the next year, i have a lot of odd jobs around town i can complete on daily course along with a few 2 & 3k jobs available but im waiting for my work permit too set it in school, but i have a neighbor right now that has given me a job that pays 30 dollars an hour soo i figure if i don't spend a dime ( except for charts and books) i have enough saved up already for this too work out.
You've got the right idea Dove. Work, save, plan, and learn...you'll get there.
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Old 19-05-2009, 00:20   #18
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You've got the right idea Dove. Work, save, plan, and learn...you'll get there.
Yup that's exactly my idea : )
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Old 19-05-2009, 15:25   #19
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It might be worth you going to the library and borrowing Dave and Jaja Martin's books on their experience and then John Niel's 1st book to give you some insight.

In SoCal a flush-deck Cal 28 would give you everything you need (the Martin's worked with a Cal 25) and can be had very inexpensively. They sail well, are good sea-boats, are easily handled; and, can be quite livable, particularly for a young man or woman. They can be beefed up for serious off-shore work pretty inexpensively as well.

See Cal 28 Sailboat Cal Boats Jensen Marine Cal 28 Bill Lathrop Jack Jensen Good Old Boat and Solid Cal 28 with Lugger Marine Diesel!

FWIW...

s/v HyLyte
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Old 19-05-2009, 16:46   #20
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I would suggest a Catalina 30 instead of a 27 for the following reasons:

1. Many 27s have outboards or gas powered inboards. The 30 is bigger and more expensive, but:

2. I think they all have diesel inboards. And they are perhaps the most popular cruising sailboat ever made which makes them easy to find and compare. Yachtworld lists 56 of them in California - almost all are under $30K:

catalina (Sail) Boats For Sale California CA
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Old 19-05-2009, 17:49   #21
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Catalina 27 has a grossly unbalanced rudder, which can be drastically improved. You can simply ditch it and hang an outboard rudder off your transom, greatly simplifying the self steering and inside steering in the proccess. You can add a skeg to further support the bottom of the rudder later. However I think a Catalina 27, being quite flimsey and having a grossly unbalanced hull, would be a very poor choice for offshore cruising. There are far better older boats available.
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Old 19-05-2009, 18:59   #22
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Dove, I suggest borrowing or buying a copy of John Vigor's book:

Amazon.com: Twenty Small Sailboats to Take You Anywhere: John Vigor: Books

Vigor knows what he's talking about, excellent sailing writer and my glance at the boats in his table of contents tells me this book should be a primary reference for you in choosing a boat.

(sorry if this has already been mentioned)
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Old 19-05-2009, 19:14   #23
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I would suggest a Catalina 30 instead of a 27 for the following reasons:

1. Many 27s have outboards or gas powered inboards. The 30 is bigger and more expensive, but:

2. I think they all have diesel inboards. And they are perhaps the most popular cruising sailboat ever made which makes them easy to find and compare. Yachtworld lists 56 of them in California - almost all are under $30K:

catalina (Sail) Boats For Sale California CA
I think the Catalina 30 hull form is much too beamy and so I would not include it on a list of boats that could be set up for long ocean passages. I think the Catalina 27 has a lot less beam and actually has been used succesfully in circumnavigations, but I would agree that an inboard diesel is definitely preferable as auxiliary power.
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Old 21-05-2009, 15:41   #24
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A friend, anchored at an atoll in the western Pacific, saw a catalina come in from Califoirnia, an easy downwind trade wind sail. All the bulkheads had come loose from the hull and the deck was separating from the hull. He had some more fibreglass materials sent and waited a long time for them to arrive. He then beefed up the hull deck joint and the bulkhead hull joints, and left. That night my friend went on deck and saw a sailboat comming up the lagoon. Next morning he saw the Catalina anchored nearby with the hull and deck joint again breaking free and the bulkheads again loose and flopping . Then the US coastguard came in dumped a lot of material in and put her well down on her lines . This time she left and didn't come back.
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Old 21-05-2009, 15:48   #25
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A friend, anchored at an atoll in the western Pacific, saw a catalina come in from Califoirnia, an easy downwind trade wind sail. All the bulkheads had come loose from the hull and the deck was separating from the hull. He had some more fibreglass materials sent and waited a long time for them to arrive. He then beefed up the hull deck joint and the bulkhead hull joints, and left. That night my friend went on deck and saw a sailboat comming up the lagoon. Next morning he saw the Catalina anchored nearby with the hull and deck joint again breaking free and the bulkheads again loose and flopping . Then the US coastguard came in dumped a lot of material in and put her well down on her lines . This time she left and didn't come back.
Brent
A few things about that story don't ring true, regarding the Coast Guard. One, what was the USCG doing in the Western Pacific? Two, I don't believe the USCG is permitted to do anything to a privately owned boat like "dump a lot of material in".
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Old 21-05-2009, 18:49   #26
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By way of an example of what might suit your needs:

1973 Morgan Out Island Center cockpit Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

Desirable features are - cared for older "overbuilt" design, full keel, high balast/displacement ratio, low engine hours, standing rigging well within 10 yr expected lifespan, good sail inventory, good electronics.

Any deficiencies in these areas will quickly eat up a $10K budget.

Sail with crew until you have enough exp. to skipper solo, your goal is def. achievable so good luck to you.

BWS
I'm happy to see that somebody already beat me to the Morgan idea. I have a 33 Out Island, and it's a Blue Water tank for it's size. We have a salty old sailor (white beard, cap, gruff voice, whole nine yards) who shuffles up to the boat every time I'm at the dock, and says the very same line every time... "Ya know.... You could take that boat to Tahiti tomorrow if ya wanted" . I believe him!

No, you won't win beer can races with her, but it will make you a better sailor having to think ahead for maneuvering. Incredible non-sailor guest boat, WAY LESS heel than average, no pounding, nor rolling.
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Old 22-05-2009, 13:13   #27
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A few things about that story don't ring true, regarding the Coast Guard. One, what was the USCG doing in the Western Pacific? Two, I don't believe the USCG is permitted to do anything to a privately owned boat like "dump a lot of material in".
That was decades ago, when the rules were easier.
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Old 22-05-2009, 14:06   #28
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The sort of idealized classic bluewater boat is: narrow, small shallow cockpit, heavy, deep or full keel protecting the prop and rudder, short and strong rigged, keel stepped mast, large tanks, secure sea berths, etc. all built to someone’s standard of extra strong.

But few boats are built like that anymore. And even among older boats, few meet all the criteria. For older boats, condition is often more important than design, even for bluewater use. Morgan O/Is are not narrow. They are strong, heavy, roomy, slow boats with powerful engines. Westsail 32s are not narrow either, but no one disputes their bluewater capability. I don’t really advocate crossing oceans in a Catalina 30, but possible hull-deck separation issues have little to do with it.
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