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Old 20-09-2009, 07:50   #16
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- - Don't be worried about having 7 kids on a catamaran. I have seen charter boats down here in the eastern Carib with 8 kids and 4 parents on board. On a cat there is so much more room for them to play - especially the forward "tramps" that they "wear themselves and each other" out and then the parents can relax back in the main salon.
- - I saw one inventive parent tie multiple springy halyard type lines of the top of his mast and tied them to the kids. It was like the famous "May Pole" with all the kids jumping over the side and springing back on board as they circled the boat. By sundown they were all "out cold" with exhaustion. A little imagination and the evenings are quiet and parents in "paradise."
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Old 20-09-2009, 08:12   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy View Post
Look at this link: Seafire.
Searunner's are fantastic boats and I think this is one of the best examples. It's listed at $80,000. I've chartered a 45' Leopard and the Searunner is a far better boat in most respects unless you are more interested in a condo that floats type of boat. I don't mean to disparage the charter cats but they are heavy their sailing qualities reflect that.
Good Luck with your search.
Thanks Randy,
I hadn't considered a tri either. I'm looking at it now. And of course I had assumed it would be triple the price of a mono.
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Old 20-09-2009, 09:55   #18
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I had a 42 foot catamaran once, lost it on some rocks because it wouldn't go to windward.

I bought it because I had two very small kids at the time (both under 5) and thought it would be a very stable platform and obviously had a lot of room inside. However, it sailed like a pig and felt dangerous in high seas.

my kids have grown up and have kids of their own and I have 'retired' from my work as a yacht delivery captain and now live on a 29ft C&C monohull. My partner and I are currently in Nova Scotia and sailing south down to Florida after two winters living aboard in Newfoundland. This boat was purchased 2 1/2 years ago in the States for $6,000

You only think you need lots of space because you currently have lots of space and you only think you need lots of money because you currently spend lots of money! The further you move away from your current lifestyle, the less money you will need to maintain your future lifestyle. More than 1/2 the worlds population lives on less than $1 a day.

In Newfoundland, our dock fees were $120 a year and we paid the harbour authority $1.50 a day for our electricity which heated the boat.

When I sail in warmer waters such as the Caribbean, our living expenses are even less as we always anchor out and have a wind charger for electricity.

My advice would be to buy a boat now and start enjoying life now!

George
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Old 20-09-2009, 12:35   #19
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... Our plans are to set sail in seven years when my husband retires with a military pension. This will be our cruising kitty. During this time, we think we can accumulate approximately $200,000 USD to buy a boat...
Sounds like a good, if a long-range, plan to me. What you might call a 'basic' cat will still probably be an amazing cruising platform - spacious, safe and comfortable. Mind that in 7 years' period you may come across a deal that will let you buy a boat at a price below the market 'asking'. Should such an opportunity knock at your door, if the dream is still alive, be ready to jump in and get the boat before the 7 years are gone. One can call it a leap of faith, but buying the boat a bit in advance may help you stream line the other threads of the project.

I would concentrate on building the skills (sailing, navigation, maintenance, French, Spanish, etc.) , reducing the land ties and keeping the dream alive. 7 years is a lot of time and 200k is enough to buy a comfortable and safe cat.

And do not cross the monos off your list either - boats are much like people - you meet the right one, you fall in love, the rest ensues.

b.
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Old 20-09-2009, 12:46   #20
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While you are without boat, consider also following up your basic course by building miles crewing for others. Join a group like "crewseekers". There are plenty of opportunities for those with little-to-no experience to get out on the water for the price of a couple of one-way airfares. Meet good people and learn what its really like out there.

DBR s/v Leopard 38 Alexian
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Old 20-09-2009, 13:40   #21
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Originally Posted by Dave View Post
I'm one of those who did the charter thing. Leopard 38/Moorings 3800, Belize 5yrs, Footloose 2 yrs.

The risk is that you're buying a used boat in advance. A benefit to me was that I've learned to sail in a number of great locations and have formed my own opinions about what suits me best. Financially, a used Leopard 38 is selling now for US$50K more than I put into it over that period of time. Best thing I've ever done.

The maintenance with charter companies is an issue. Like any rental property it will see lots of use, largely by newbies (like I was..) and the maintenance during that period is often rushed for rental turn-arounds and is clearly not that of a privately owned boat. However, the phase-out at the end of the contract is where you either get a good boat or a bucket of troubles. Time, patience and personal involvement in the phase-out process makes the difference.

I was lucky. The boat I initially chose (when I knew little-to-nothing about sailboats) turned out to be the boat I still like best today. (ie Simonis designed Leopards)

The charter thing is not for everyone, but it sure worked for me.

Dave s/v Alexian
Hi Dave,

Thanks so much for your post. I need more information from you... I have just received some info from Sunsail regarding putting a boat into charter.

If the charter program is five years, I start this in two, so the boat is available in seven? Do you still own your chartered boat? When you say $50K more then you put into it, are you referring to previously chartered resale cats? I have many more ? but that's a start.

I suppose there is a forum for owners at sunsail?
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Old 20-09-2009, 13:47   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snapdragon747 View Post
I had a 42 foot catamaran once, lost it on some rocks because it wouldn't go to windward.

I bought it because I had two very small kids at the time (both under 5) and thought it would be a very stable platform and obviously had a lot of room inside. However, it sailed like a pig and felt dangerous in high seas.

my kids have grown up and have kids of their own and I have 'retired' from my work as a yacht delivery captain and now live on a 29ft C&C monohull. My partner and I are currently in Nova Scotia and sailing south down to Florida after two winters living aboard in Newfoundland. This boat was purchased 2 1/2 years ago in the States for $6,000

You only think you need lots of space because you currently have lots of space and you only think you need lots of money because you currently spend lots of money! The further you move away from your current lifestyle, the less money you will need to maintain your future lifestyle. More than 1/2 the worlds population lives on less than $1 a day.

In Newfoundland, our dock fees were $120 a year and we paid the harbour authority $1.50 a day for our electricity which heated the boat.

When I sail in warmer waters such as the Caribbean, our living expenses are even less as we always anchor out and have a wind charger for electricity.

My advice would be to buy a boat now and start enjoying life now!

George
Wow! Thanks.

My husband is not going to budge on the seven year timeline. I am Canadian, raised in New Brunswick. I would not have chosen Newfoundland as a place to winter. I must reconsider since you did it twice!

If you have grandkids now, that cat you owned must have been one of the first!
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Old 20-09-2009, 14:11   #23
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QUOTE SNAPDRAGON from a different thread:

"I am 49 years old. I was apprenticed to a boat builder at the age of 16. When I finished my apprenticeship at the age of 20, I raced boats locally and across oceans for a living, first as crew than as skipper.
I am a qualified yacht delivery 'captain' and currently make my living as I cruise around the world on my 29ft sailboat repairing boats, buying and selling boats and writing articles for sailing magazines.

It has been a great career which has taken me around the world. I still love boats and everything about boats. Some of the people aren't so great, but some of the people are fantastic.

George"

Disregard my comment above George. I see why you wintered where you did. Fabulous (and romantic to me) life!
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