Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 23-01-2015, 10:30   #16
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,365
Re: Go big or training wheels?

I'm thinking go for the big boat now. It takes a couple years to get everything on it sorted out how you want it anyway.
An alternative would be to buy a smaller Non trailerable. Trailering a sailboat is a PITA. You will be worn out by the time you setup the rig, launch and reverse all that!
Or , rather than invest big...., maybe a smaller but a boat that stays in the marina, you will be able to go out and really see if you both like the cruising part... for weekends, vactions etc...
__________________

__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 10:42   #17
Registered User
 
hoppy's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Boat: Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 40
Posts: 2,842
Re: Go big or training wheels?

I went from zero to hero, sort of.

I sailed a lot up until about 21 on my fathers 27 and then 34 foot yachts. For one winter whilst we still had both boats I had full access to that the 27 out. Then I did not sail again for another 25 years. I had a motorboat for a couple of seasons before I got bored of it. Sold it and bought my first yacht, my 40ft Jeanneau.

I arranged a skipper to "hold my hand" for the first 5 days, then had 2 weeks with my family. Since then I have mostly sailed solo, no problem.

Life's to short to take baby steps in the buying game. Go for it...

Hire a skipper to give you a training course on your boat for a week or until you feel confident enough.
__________________

__________________
S/Y Jessabbé http://www.jessabbe.com/
hoppy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 10:48   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 22
Re: Go big or training wheels?

Thanks everyone for the replies. As much as I want the Morgan now, smaller first is seeming to make more sense.

A couple additions (to answer ?s).

My recent experience entails about a dozen day trips and 2 overighters with different skippers on different boats. Amazing what you can find at the local yacht club.

Budget (now vs later) is not a huge concern for us.

7 years is as far out as we will go. We are debt free except for the house which will be paid off in 7 years...hopefully expedited to 5 years.

Planning on long distance cruising without plans or schedule. Renting the house plus savings should allow us to stay gone as long as we want.




Sent from my iPhone using Cruisers Sailing Forum
__________________
Legend1673 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 10:55   #19
Registered User
 
hoppy's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Boat: Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 40
Posts: 2,842
Re: Go big or training wheels?

If you are unsure that you will actually do it in 5-7 years then take the baby steps, but if you feel you will certainly do it, get the boat you want to do it on now.

If you buy smaller, you will end up having to throw money at it which will feel wasted, then you'll have the hassle of trying to sell it.

If anything, do your training course, crew as much as possible at the local club and perhaps even do a 2 week charter. Then buy the boat you want
__________________
S/Y Jessabbé http://www.jessabbe.com/
hoppy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 11:09   #20
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Long Beach, CA
Boat: Tayana Vancouver 42
Posts: 1,854
Re: Go big or training wheels?

Understand there are several different aspects of sail cruising to learn. How to sail a boat, shape sails, manage ballast, maneuver to a dock, minor fiberglass repair and some rope work are all easier to learn on a smaller less complex and less costly boat. Living aboard and cruising involves many skills you will not learn on a small boat. Diesel mechanics, electronic navigation, pressure water systems, waste water management, handling big sails in bigger wind and rough seas, anchoring systems and techniques, bottom cleaning, provisioning, dinghy management, storage of spare parts, route planning, weather...are all necessary skills requiring study and practice.

So, no really right or wrong approach. There is a great advantage to both. Whether you buy your cruising boat now or later, try to find time on a small light simple boat, racing, club or just daysailing. That will be the easiest part and the quickest to learn. Then give yourselves time, preferably a couple of years or more to get to know your cruising boat, and to experience living aboard before cutting the dock lines.

Best wishes for you on the start of your sailing adventure.


S/V B'Shert
__________________
Tayana42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 11:26   #21
Registered User
 
Cadence's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: SC
Boat: None,build the one shown of glass, had many from 6' to 48'.
Posts: 6,063
Re: Go big or training wheels?

I believe you should go slow. Get the experience and take some courses the insurance industry will recognize. You may find you have bought the proverbial hole it the water that is not what you want or worse yet you can't find live aboard insurance or even liability to meet marina requirements.


For what it may or may not be worth?
__________________
Cadence is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 11:39   #22
Registered User
 
IntoMyHealth's Avatar

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Connecticut
Boat: Beneteau 473
Posts: 141
Re: Go big or training wheels?

Quote:
Originally Posted by hoppy View Post
I went from zero to hero, sort of.



I sailed a lot up until about 21 on my fathers 27 and then 34 foot yachts. For one winter whilst we still had both boats I had full access to that the 27 out. Then I did not sail again for another 25 years. I had a motorboat for a couple of seasons before I got bored of it. Sold it and bought my first yacht, my 40ft Jeanneau.



I arranged a skipper to "hold my hand" for the first 5 days, then had 2 weeks with my family. Since then I have mostly sailed solo, no problem.



Life's to short to take baby steps in the buying game. Go for it...



Hire a skipper to give you a training course on your boat for a week or until you feel confident enough.

This thread is great. Everyone's opinion is right for the particular poster. The one above is so close to mine it's a little scary. We closed on a "modern" 47 footer five months ago and find it easy to handle and very comfortable. But it took us two years of weighing, shopping, and educating ourselves to get there. And we consider this the beginning. Go with what feels right. My only advise is to not kid yourself financially. Burying yourself will only breed frustration and resentment, which are both anti-sailing. I'm excited for you! Good luck!



Sent from my iPhone using Cruisers Sailing Forum
__________________
IntoMyHealth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 11:44   #23
Registered User

Join Date: May 2013
Location: Mangareva, French Polynesia
Boat: Heritage West Indies 36
Posts: 513
Re: Go big or training wheels?

I would go stright for the 38-footer if that's the one you want. Buying and selling boats is a pain and you're also bound to lose money in the process. No matter how nice a boat is when you buy it there will always be things you don't like and want to change.

Sailing a 38-foot boat isn't inherently any harder than sailing a smaller one, it's just more expensive if you screw up! There are also many things that apply to small boats that don't apply to big ones and vice versa, so you'd have to re-learn a lot of stuff anyway if you started small and moved up. It will be daunting and the learning curve will be steep, but in my experience if i have a lack of skills in some area it's never been too hard to bribe someone more knowledgeable with beer to teach me!
__________________
DefinitelyMe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 11:51   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Great Lakes
Boat: Laser x4 - Stiletto 23 - Grampian 26 - Next: Catalina 42 MkII
Posts: 68
Re: Go big or training wheels?

Go big and get a Laser\Laser II. Sail the hell out of the dinghy and you will be rewarded in short order with incredible sailing knowledge, experience and confidence. Time in is time in. Everything I needed to know (including spinnaker work) about sailing I learned in my Laser. All that dinghy experience has served me well in all my sailing endeavours over 40 years (racing around buoys, distance, ocean) and cruising. There is no substitute for experience and confidence on the water. Dinghies will demand a great deal of you initially but reward you with invaluable experience and confidence without breaking the bank!

Good luck...
__________________
Divevac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 11:56   #25
Registered User
 
thomm225's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Hampton Roads
Boat: 1974 Bristol 27
Posts: 3,469
Re: Go big or training wheels?

It looks like you have very little experience on boats.

What if you find cruising a bit slow for your taste then maybe the 32' boat would be all you need for daysailing, weekends, and short trips of a few weeks.

I see lots and lots of boats that rarey leave the marina.

There's a Hylas 44 here that is an awesome boat, but it never moves expect up and down with the tide. After 5 years, it is now for sale I believe and that's just one of 100's.
__________________
thomm225 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 13:20   #26
Registered User
 
FamilyVan's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,779
Re: Go big or training wheels?

I actually frequently miss my 30', cost is a factor for me, but not a crippling cost, my 35 is paid off and I'm debt free.

The reason I miss my 30 is she was so easy to sail. I'd finish work at 5:30 and actually go out for a half hour sail in the evening. I just don't do that on my 35. It's more work to set the sails, douse the sails, get in and out of dock etc. I do this all on my own to boot. Not only that but my 30 was more performance based and we could really sail the snot out of it with no concern. 25-30 knots- to heck with it- put everything up, we'll go faster! I don't really do that with our live aboard.

I'm seriously thinking about trading down in size for cruising.

Sent from my SGH-I547C using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
__________________
FamilyVan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 14:34   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 278
Re: Go big or training wheels?

Get the boat you can use now. Smaller = cheaper. You can learn a lot on a smaller boat that will save you money when you get a larger boat. You'll also build confidence a lot quicker, and find out what you like and don't like.

Depending on the size, it wouldn't surprise me if you could completely pay for the smaller boat just in the difference you'd pay for maintenance/slip fees for the larger boat.
__________________
WindwardPrinces is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 14:51   #28
Registered User
 
Cadence's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: SC
Boat: None,build the one shown of glass, had many from 6' to 48'.
Posts: 6,063
Re: Go big or training wheels?

Quote:
Originally Posted by WindwardPrinces View Post
Get the boat you can use now. Smaller = cheaper. You can learn a lot on a smaller boat that will save you money when you get a larger boat. You'll also build confidence a lot quicker, and find out what you like and don't like.

Depending on the size, it wouldn't surprise me if you could completely pay for the smaller boat just in the difference you'd pay for maintenance/slip fees for the larger boat.
And then some.
__________________
Cadence is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 14:56   #29
Bailing as fast as I can.
 
GILow's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Boat: Swanson 42
Posts: 3,585
Re: Go big or training wheels?

I grew up sailing since I was four, owned lots of odd boats on the way, but I am still very glad we did not rush into our current 42 footer but went via a 20 foot trailer sailor for a few reasons.

1. The trailer sailor was my first boat with the inclusion of a galley, bedding, electrics etc, and it got my thinking on such things in a much better space. I was much clearer on what was important to me.

2. It was the first boat I owned where I could not just get out and push, weighing in at a bit over a ton. The sails were big enough that they needed to be manged, while still being manageable. So in summary, the boat was big enough to be treated seriously while not being so big that a mistake was likely to be a disaster.

3. Finally, we owned the 20 foot boat for about five years, during which time it halved in value, mainly due to the GFC. But in the same period the 42 footer we were looking at halved in value too. Needless to say this translated to a huge saving.

If I were doing it all again I would do much the same. Maybe a slightly bigger trailer boat, simply because getting around decks on a 24 footer is generally a bit easier than a 20 footer. And since many clubs offer hard stand storage with the mast up the launch and retrieval is not such a drama. I had launch down to less than ten minutes including parking the club tractor. And FWIW I plan to go back to a trailer boat one day when I've had enough of the big boring 42 footer. I still miss it.

Matt


Sent from my iPad using Cruisers Sailing Forum
__________________
Very funny Scotty, now beam down my clothes.
http://www.swansonsailor.id.au
GILow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2015, 15:30   #30
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,395
Images: 34
Re: Go big or training wheels?

Lot of good advice here. I like what divevac said. And I don't like the term "training wheels." Get 2 lasers or Hobie Cats (one for you and your wife, better to learn solo) and have lots of crazy, wet, fast fun with them and when you both have really caught the SAILING bug you will then be in a much better mindset for big boat shopping. you can do both at the same time if you are POSITIVE about your big boat choice, but even experienced sailors change their minds about their dream boats. Check Bluewaterboats.org for a bunch of good ones. all my humble opinion...
__________________

__________________
DL
Pythagoras
1962 Columbia 29 MKI #37
Don C L is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
wheel

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How Big Is Too Big to Singlehand ? kcmarcet General Sailing Forum 29 01-06-2014 18:24
Training Wheels Are Off Cuajota Our Community 1 13-10-2011 04:36
How Big Is Big Enough for Anchoring on the Bay of Fundy? OrangeCrush Monohull Sailboats 9 17-09-2009 10:43
How big is too big? Capnlindy General Sailing Forum 98 04-06-2007 08:14
my big, big, plan faithful Meets & Greets 1 17-10-2004 15:28



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:40.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.