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Old 17-06-2007, 13:56   #1
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Weather Handbook

We have all heard it. The weather is the most important thing to know out there while sailing.... and I agree!

Steve Dashew website is great. He seams to have done it all. He advertises his book Mariner's Weather Handbook as " the must read in weather books".

Have any of you out there read it?
Whats your comments?


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Old 18-06-2007, 01:17   #2
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I had a book by Dashew that was supposed to tell me everything I need to know about weather. I think it was this book, but I can't be absolutely sure of the title -- I put it down after reading a few chapters and never looked at it again.

I didn't like it. I remember the impression that it was not particularly well-organized or well-written. I also remember finding some descriptions to be useless because they depended on some concept that was not explained until a later chapter.

I know many people say good things about this book, but I did not find it useful. I suspect that if you have already studied weather and weather terminology, the book is a lot easier to read. I've never been that interested in weather (understanding weather is a means to an end, not an end itself), so I couldn't say.

I previously was unimpressed by one of his videos, and after reading this book I decided not to buy anything else written by Dashew.
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Old 18-06-2007, 02:16   #3
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I’ve never even seen a copy of:
Mariner's Weather Handbook by Steve & Linda Dashew
Mariner's Weather Handbook by Steve & Linda Dashew
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Old 18-06-2007, 06:24   #4
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Weather handbook

Gord,

His web site is SetSail.com and the book is advertised on many of the pages.

I think the ability to get weather information on a boat, both coastal cruising or water sailing">blue water sailing has hit high tek if that is what you want but being able to read the information correctly is what I would like to study.

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Old 18-06-2007, 07:06   #5
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Certainly not 600 pages, but some of the basics are covered at:
Reading Weather Charts & North American Weather Signs
Reading Weather Charts

See also:
NASA CLOUD CHART
http://www.cruisersforum.com/gallery...=500&userid=79

Sailnet has an excellent article on using Satelite immagry for weather forecasting.
www.sailnet.com/view.cfm?page=11975

JET CONTRAILS & WEATHER FORECASTING:
THICK &/or LINGERING CONTRAILS - indicate changing weather and/or precipitation
DISSIPATING or NO CONTRAILS - indicate continuing and/or clearing weather.

The plume of condensed water vapor in the exhaust trailing behind high flying jet aircraft is called a “contrail” - short for condensation trail. Contrails are long white streaks of ice crystals left behind in the exhaust of flying jet aircraft. At 8 to 12 km (5-7.5 mi.) above the ground, the jet engine pulls in very cold, dry air and spews out hot, water-filled exhaust. The hot water vapour mixes with the colder surrounding air. In doing so, it expands and freezes in (1 or 2 seconds) forming a trail of ice-crystal clouds. Contrails will only form into long-lasting visible cirrus-like cloud formations when the air temperature is at -40C or lower (-40F) and the humidity level is at 70% or greater.

Contrails can provide a clue to upcoming weather. If a jet leaves no trail or a short trail; or if the trail fades quickly - it is an indication that the air is relatively dry and sinking, which suggests that fair weather is likely to continue. On the other hand, if the exhaust trails linger for an hour or more; or they spread across the entire sky - the surrounding air is probably moist and rising, foretelling the arrival of a storm in a day or two. Reading contrails gives you a glimpse as to the weather over the next 12 to 24 hours.

Sky light blue to dark blue. Bright moon. Jet contrail disappears immediately or doesn't form. all indicate: Continuing Good Weather, Clear.

Large halo circling moon or sun. Jet contrail lingers thickly before falling apart indicate: Possible Change.
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Old 19-06-2007, 07:35   #6
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Local weather factors

Look for weather texts about your specific cruising area, to supplement more general "sailor's weather forecasting" texts. Each region has specific trends and types of weather, and getting insights into what usually happens in your neck of the woods will often be more valuable in a pinch than what you read in a book designed to give you general guidance which works anywhere in the mid latitudes.

And keep in mind that many weather texts cover the traditional weather patterns for the mid latitudes northern hemisphere (published in the USA, and often only relevant to the western Atlantic) or mid-upper latitudes (published in the UK, and often only relevant eastern Atlantic/English Channel/North Sea.) Lower latitudes, monsoons, and other large weather regions are given short shrift because the vast majority of the audience are unlikely to go there except on armchair voyages or charters. This is the right choice by the authors/publishers, but it's just something to remember that the rules of thumb and guidance may be of limited value outside the mid-to-upper lats, or outside the Atlantic.

(note to self: pick up that weather text for west coast Vancouver Island from boat and read it again.)
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