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Old 24-04-2010, 20:21   #1
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Eleven Year-Old Boy Needs Sailing Adventure Book

My 11 y/o son Cody and I have been learning to sail together so I want to get him a book that will keep him entertained and hopefully prime the pump for grander sailing adventures in the future. He's an extremely bright boy but would rather be doing something than reading so.....? Any suggestions? Eric
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Old 24-04-2010, 20:24   #2
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The Patrick O'Brian series will be a great sailing adventure series that will get him primed for sailing adventures
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Old 24-04-2010, 21:04   #3
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The Patrick O'Brian series will be a great sailing adventure series that will get him primed for sailing adventures
Yes. And read them aloud together, all 20 books. I can't think of a better bonding base with your son over sailing, and life in general. Likewise, the Horatio Hornblower series, 6 or 7 books. But don't let him read Dove, or he may end up leaving without you in a few years.
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Old 25-04-2010, 04:42   #4
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I'm actually reading the Patrick O'Brian series now (just finished book #6 - The Fortune of War). Whilst I find it gripping, the language is rather archaic and there are a number of scenes that will not bother adults but may embarrass 11 year old boys.

They are good books, but if he doesn't like reading they may be heavy going for him.
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Old 25-04-2010, 05:00   #5
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O'Brians are sometimes difficult for young people to read because the language of old english which at times is difficult to read, saying that have him read Alexander Kent series. They are easier and just as a fun and knowledgeable.
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Old 25-04-2010, 05:47   #6
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When I was that age, I read Dove and vaguely recall it being amazing, it might be time for a re-read. I also read Watership Down, and was very disappointed to find it was about rabbits and not ships.

Robin Lee Graham (1972). Dove. HarperCollins. ISBN 0-06-011603-X.
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Old 25-04-2010, 07:03   #7
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Robb White's "The Lion's Paw" is a great sailing adventure story.

Also, the Arthur Ransome books -- starting with "Swallows and Amazons." It takes a bit of getting used to the British idiom, and I find some modern American readers won't get past the first 20 pages of S&A. If you do, it picks up steam and is un-put-downable. Then, you can move on to such treats as "We Didn't Mean to Go to Sea," and "Peter Duck," and the rest.
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Old 25-04-2010, 07:18   #8
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This book is a great little book for kids - our two oldest ones have worn out our first copy and we are buying another for our next in line:
Amazon.com: Windcatcher (Avon Camelot Book) (9780380718054): Avi: Books

It is not about world cruising but is about an eleven year old boy who saves up his money to buy a Snark and the adventures that follow on the Connecticut shore.
I would post an excerpt but I'm not sure I am supposed to do that.
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Old 25-04-2010, 07:27   #9
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You can post a short excerpt. A paragraph or two is allowed under the "Fair Use" doctrine for copyrighted materials.
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Old 25-04-2010, 07:34   #10
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Thanks, HUD!

From Amazon.com:
Quote:
Grade 4-6-- Tony Souza, 11, uses his paper route earnings to buy a 12-foot sailboat that he takes with him when he spends part of the summer with his grandmother on the Connecticut shore. During his stay, he learns to sail and becomes intrigued by tales of buried treasure in the area. He and his grandmother learn more about the treasure, and he begins to piece together clues
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Old 25-04-2010, 07:39   #11
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It takes a bit of getting used to the British idiom,
Really?

I'm fascinated. What can we Brits say that could possibly be confusing?

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Old 25-04-2010, 07:54   #12
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Thanks for some great suggestions! I have to say that learning to sail with my son has done wonders with bringing my son and I closer. It's exciting and he gets to do something that he's better at than his Dad. I've studied my ass off and have a few more practices than he does but he goes out a few times (no studying) and looks as if he grew up on a sailboat...It's wonderful to see him so excited! Eric
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Old 25-04-2010, 08:01   #13
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Treasure Island is a fantastic read, though it's less about sailing and more about fighting pirates for treasure. The hero of the story is a young boy. I thought it was a fantastic read, and its considered 7th grade reading material, so it's easier to read than Patrick O'Brien.
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Old 25-04-2010, 09:38   #14
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Another good book for boy and man.



From Publishers Weekly

Bode ( Blue Sloop at Dawn ) uses his great love of sailing as a metaphor for the tides of life. Describing his own introduction to sailing at age 12, he stresses the importance of mastering the simple, small things before attempting more complicated actions. Later the author purchases a blue sloop, matures and, as a grown man with children, decides to sell the sloop and sail into new, uncharted waters, assuming he will never forget the many important lessons the boat taught him. Other themes include complacency ("Going with the Wind"), confusion ("Fogbound"), forgiveness ("A Forgiving Boat"), and violence ("A Lazy Sailor at Heart"). Determinedly inspirational, this book will appeal to admirers of Robert Fulghum et al.
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Old 25-04-2010, 09:59   #15
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where to start?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mintyspilot View Post
I'm fascinated. What can we Brits say that could possibly be confusing?
To begin with, there's that whole confusion over chips and crisps. And then when you start talking football, you're on the wrong sport. And then there's a whole vocabulary that's not entirely English: bubblers, spanners, lifts, aggro, bang, baccy, chuffed, cracking and codswallop, to name a few.

Apologies for the thread drift.
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