Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 04-03-2010, 14:25   #16
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
The Annapolis Book of Seamanship is the best IMHO. Then Chapman's. There is a "Sailing for Dummies" but I don't know how good it is.
I've already requested The Annapolis Book of Seamanship through my library! Thanks man.
__________________

__________________
AquaBoi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2010, 14:32   #17
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Harwich/Cape Cod, MA, USA
Boat: 1984 Aphrodite 101 Hull #264
Posts: 166
Send a message via Skype™ to NormanMartin
AquaBoi!
I live in Boston and sail year round. You can too. Granted, the November to May portion is pretty chilly. As for places to sail without having to spend much coin:
Community Boating on the Charles River, summers only
Courageous Sailing Club in Charlestown is open year round, I used to be a member.
Piers Park in East Boston, where we keep our boat in the summer.
Norm
__________________

__________________
NormanMartin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2010, 14:46   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by NormanMartin View Post
I will be following this thread as I am writing technical material for an online sailing program. Can't do the sailing part on line but one can prepare in a variety of ways for being on board. On line is one way to get ready to sail.

Check out nauticed.com I do not know the guys who run it. A friend of mine, whom I trust, does and says they are the real deal.
I actually found this cool app through NauticEd. Check it out:
Learn to sail online with sailing classes and lessons

Thank you Norm.
__________________
AquaBoi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2010, 14:50   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by NormanMartin View Post
AquaBoi!
I live in Boston and sail year round. You can too. Granted, the November to May portion is pretty chilly. As for places to sail without having to spend much coin:
Community Boating on the Charles River, summers only
Courageous Sailing Club in Charlestown is open year round, I used to be a member.
Piers Park in East Boston, where we keep our boat in the summer.
Norm
Norm! These winters are too cold man, and the cold season lasts so long. Although, I wonder if Seattle is any better lol. Maybe not as cold, but that rain and cloud! But at least that weather means more boat time (or at least I assume, I could be wrong). Would love to hear from someone who lives on the Puget.
__________________
AquaBoi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2010, 15:29   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Harwich/Cape Cod, MA, USA
Boat: 1984 Aphrodite 101 Hull #264
Posts: 166
Send a message via Skype™ to NormanMartin
Our son and his wife lived out there for years. The PNW sailing season is short for most sailors. For the best information, call San Juan Sailing in Bellingham. Top quality folks. We chartered from them one year. Fell in love with the PNW. Of course, we love the New England Coast and the Caribbean, too.

The sailing season is short everywhere. Heck, I have lived in the Caribbean for a total of six years and in Florida for ten. Boats are active for only four to six months in most places. Caveat: The folk who want to sail year round, do.

I think two of the reason boats aren't really sailed hard all year are
1. maintenance
2. social conflicts

And then, of course, there is work. Today, watching the snow fall, I am happy for my little office.

Did you go to the NE Boat Show?

Sales pitch alert! Mark May 1 and 2 and come by Boston Sailing for our Open House. Tell them you know me and they will charge you extra! haha.

Norm
__________________
NormanMartin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2010, 23:30   #21
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18
Hey guys, random quick question, how far is it from Victoria to Seattle? I read somewhere it's 113km. At 7 knots, thats 13km/h, which is like 8 hours. It doesnt sound right.

Is there a cool site I can checkout to measure nautical miles between destinations?

Thanks!
__________________
AquaBoi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2010, 23:32   #22
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18
World Ports Distances

Man, thats messed up? I see most sailboats cruise at 7 knots correct?

Distance = 70 Nautical Miles
Time usage = 0 days 10 hours
Departure from VICTORIA
Port Code: CAVIC
Country: CANADA - B.COLUMBIA
Longitude: 12321'W
Latitude: 4825'N
Date: 05-03-2010
Time: 00:00

Arriving to SEATTLE
Port Code: USSEA
Country: USA - WASHINGTON
Longitude: 12220'W
Latitude: 4736'N
Date: 05-03-2010
Time: 10:00
__________________
AquaBoi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 05:29   #23
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AquaBoi View Post
World Ports Distances

Man, thats messed up? I see most sailboats cruise at 7 knots correct?
Nope. Your "cruising speed" (average?) is based on a lot of things, not least being the boat's waterline, sail area and the conditions.

With most cruising monohulls in 35-40' range, you can't really plan on averaging anything close to 7 knots - that's more like top speed. A general rule of thumb on a trade wind passage is to expect no more than 100nm/day. Often, you can do better than that, but you can't count on it. And, some days, you'll be luck to do 60nm. Again, it all depends.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 05:29   #24
Registered User
 
Christian Van H's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Princeton, NJ
Boat: Challenger Anacapa 42
Posts: 2,097
Images: 57
Use this to calculate the upper limit of a boats hull speed: Boat Speed | Hull Speed | Speed Calculator

As for a website, see here: ActiveCaptain - The Interactive Cruising Guidebook
__________________
www.anacapas.com

Here's to swimmin' with bowlegged women!
Christian Van H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 06:10   #25
Marine Service Provider
 
Inkwell's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: St. Simons Island, Ga.
Boat: Hunter Legend 37.5 1993
Posts: 241
Send a message via Skype™ to Inkwell
Go to NetFlix and search sailing. They have several DVDs to rent or download to your computer. Lots of sailing-related movies, Wind, Capn Ron, etc. Go to the library check out the David Poyer and Alexander Kent collection of " nautical" books. Good fun reading.
__________________
Eat Well. Savor Life.
Inkwell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 08:12   #26
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 19
I would recommend any book written by Steve and Linda Dashew. Just type their names into Amazon and then take the list of titles to any book store or library.

I am an avid reader already, but I literally devour these books. They are the size of text books and are written towards those who live aboard, but the information and experience is incredible.

I have also joined local clubs like the local Hobie Fleet (When I owned a Hobie) becuase they often hold various sailing classes or events. The education I received just standing on the beach with other Hobie owners was invaluable. Helping them rig their boats before a sail or asking their help on mine was always a big help, as well.

Lastly, the ASA courses are well worth the money. I have ASA 101, 103 and 104. I could have tested out of 101, but didn't want to. It was worth it to get on board with those who had never sailed as they often had questions I hadn't thought of. It helped me build the knowledge I needed to support and underpin the facts I already knew, but didn't know why or how I knew them.

I hope that all made sense.
__________________
skeedaddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 09:03   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sneuman View Post
Nope. Your "cruising speed" (average?) is based on a lot of things, not least being the boat's waterline, sail area and the conditions.

With most cruising monohulls in 35-40' range, you can't really plan on averaging anything close to 7 knots - that's more like top speed. A general rule of thumb on a trade wind passage is to expect no more than 100nm/day. Often, you can do better than that, but you can't count on it. And, some days, you'll be luck to do 60nm. Again, it all depends.
Thank you for all your tips guys. Re: the 100nm / day guideline - does this mean only sailing during the day, say 16 hours. Or are you including night sailing?
__________________
AquaBoi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 09:07   #28
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkwell View Post
Go to NetFlix and search sailing. They have several DVDs to rent or download to your computer. Lots of sailing-related movies, Wind, Capn Ron, etc. Go to the library check out the David Poyer and Alexander Kent collection of " nautical" books. Good fun reading.
Best idea ever! I have Netflix and they actually have streaming DVDs I can watch instantly. Thank you sir!
__________________
AquaBoi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 11:05   #29
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AquaBoi View Post
Thank you for all your tips guys. Re: the 100nm / day guideline - does this mean only sailing during the day, say 16 hours. Or are you including night sailing?
that would be over 24 hours. Like I say, for the kind of boat I have very roughly described, you might do as well as 125nm/24 hours. Very occasionally, you might be able to peg it over and get 150nm. But you would need to factor that in with the days when you might only make 50 or 60nm.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 11:08   #30
CF Adviser
 
Intentional Drifter's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Pac NW
Boat: Boatless, for now, Cat enthusiast
Posts: 1,283
Quote:
Originally Posted by AquaBoi View Post
For our family, there is nothing we cant achieve. It's just a matter of time and commitment, and we can get anything done! I do however have a question though about the shallows in the Puget. I've never been out there so have no idea. Would say a 31 footer be restrictive in terms of where you can go? I wouldnt want to limit myself to certain areas and also run the risk of screwing up my keel by accident! And also, when we moor out in deeper waters, how the heck do we get to land to have a picnic if we dont have a dingy (I'm assuming a 31 footer doesnt have space for a small craft to get to land but I'm a novice so correct me if I'm wrong)
Puget Sound has plenty of deep water and the shallows are (almost always) well charted. You can find places in the San Juans where uncharted rocks lurk, but there's usually enough local knowledge to see you through.

A 31-footer is plenty big enough to have some extended cruising and get you around just fine. Also big enough for a small dink without a problem. Most folks end up putting them on the foredeck if you don't have davits. If the sea state is calm, towing works fine (though, use polypro painter, as it floats and keeps it out of the prop).

In terms of Seattle - Victoria, it isn't the distance, but the obstacles and tides! Very often, going N you'll have the wind off the aft quarter to Port Townsend. But, then you have the Straits of Juan de Fuca to deal with. Big currents and depending on weather, you can get wind against tide and big, steep waves. Currents can get up to 3 knots and you've got to compensate. Also, the rips off Admirality can be vicious. It is all about weather and timing. Then, coming S, you can spend lots of time with the wind on the nose. Again, all about weather and timing. Both ways can be great sails, or miserable. And, let's not forget about fog. When the dew point hits just right, on an otherwise beautiful morning, you can find yourself fogged in, within minutes. Pretty amazing, actually and beautiful in its own way -- but dangerous as heck if you don't know what your doing and don't have radar.

One of the sailing mantras: "The most dangerous tool on a sailboat is the calendar." Having to stick to an external schedule is where decisions get made that endanger the boat, and hence, the crew. Resist that temptation. I can tell you where, I can tell you when, just not at the same time!

ID
__________________

__________________
Intentional Drifter

Observations are gold; hypotheses, silver; and conclusions, bronze.

Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.--Ben Franklin

Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts.--Daniel Patrick Moynihan
Intentional Drifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
NC Surveyor You'd Recommend? MikeZ General Sailing Forum 5 08-01-2010 14:51
Recommend a Good Surveyor? aboutgone Monohull Sailboats 4 30-08-2009 23:09
Recommend a boat? corkscrew Monohull Sailboats 0 12-08-2008 09:49
August 22 - A Ripping Good Sail, or, Anybody NOAA good forecaster??? skipgundlach General Sailing Forum 0 22-08-2007 17:50
Good book for cruising with kids tenknots The Library 1 03-04-2003 22:49



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 14:46.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.