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Old 27-02-2010, 10:59   #16
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Thanks, I guess it will be something like carnauba or bees wax.
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Old 27-02-2010, 11:46   #17
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I sing the praises of Bioshield T9, it works on Lugs, blocks, pullys, everything I have used it on. Non staining.
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Old 27-02-2010, 12:06   #18
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While T9 is great for corrosion (think Boeing aluminum airplanes), my hands down winner for lubrication around a sailboat is McLube Sailkote. Racers use it on just about everything but the deck non-skid.

It's non-staining, not sticky, invisible, and doesn't wash off easily. "No effort" application - just spray. I use it on traveler beams, block cheeks, mainsail luffs, genoa tracks. I even spray it on my roller furling sails to make them roll tighter and make them easier to clean. Not a bad short term antifouling spray for the RIB dinghy up to about 30 days underwater. Also good on the hull near the exhaust exit to make soot not stick.

No relation to the company although I wish this post would get me a discount

Sailkote, Hullkote, OneDrop, Sailkote PLUS: Innovative Dry Lubricants for All Your Sailing Needs - McLube

Carl
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Old 28-02-2010, 12:25   #19
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Originally Posted by CarlF View Post
While T9 is great for corrosion (think Boeing aluminum airplanes), my hands down winner for lubrication around a sailboat is McLube Sailkote ...
McLube Sailkote is formulated with Dupont “Krytox”, which is 70% Perfluoroalkylether (PFAE) + 30% Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).

It’s basically nothing more than a dry Teflon; but it seems to work exceptionally well (IMHO).
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Old 28-02-2010, 21:27   #20
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Teflon ... the most pervasive man made material in the universe. Shucks. I was more excited about it before I knew that. So is teflon really Perfluoroalkylether Polytetrafluoroethylene? Can't imagine why they needed a different name ...
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Old 02-03-2010, 09:47   #21
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The “newer” Milwaukee #0721-21 V28 Cordless (battery) Right Angle Drill Kit uses a 28V Lithium Ion battery, and produces 1081 in./lbs.Torque (122 nm). It’s overall Length is 18.5".

“V28" Drill < $400 + Winch driver adapter (“The Cranker”*) @ $19.95 = ± $420


The Cranker - a S.S. Sailboat Winch Drill Adapter Bit

Vs Winchrite 18V producing 110 nm Torque (973 in/lb)
@ $549

* The Cranker - a S.S. Sailboat Winch Drill Adapter Bit
Ive been using the Milwaukee R/A drill now for a couple of years now and I can say it's like having power winches on board. Just have to pay attention as you can get into trouble if a sheet or haylard get fouled. As far as the Cranker goes IMO. not a very good design I broke two of them before I went with the winch mate that you can get on ebay for around $40. US. A little more money but better design.
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Old 05-08-2010, 09:01   #22
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Actual Experince with WinchRite??

I am looking for an actual experience-based review of the WinchRite Cordless Electric Winch Drive. I've read the opinions in favor of using a right angle power drill. That is fine, but not what I want, for various reasons.
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Old 15-09-2010, 12:24   #23
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I own and use the WinchRite power unit.

I bought the WinchRite as soon as it came on the market. I'm past my seventies and my wife is a couple of years younger but we still like to sail our boat which is a Hunter 27. It has furling main and jib and furling up the main is hard for both of us. Lots of hand cranking.

So we bought the WinchRite this past January. We got it in May and it has been the answer to our needs. It is light weight, just under six pounds so that my wife can use it. It pulls the main out and in with ease--all we have to do is stand in the companionway on the first step and pull the handle. It also looks good....belongs on my boat.

It has a trickle charger as well as a shore power adapter. I've never used the shore power system, just the trickle charger as I primarily day sail.

I did look at the Winch Buddy. It was useable but too heavy for my wife to use. It also was fairly large and a problem for me to store. But I think in some instances it would work very well.

I have not found any negatives to the WinchRite at this time. I don't know how long the battery lasts as I recharge after each sail. However, for the moment, it has my recommendation. I do not have anything to do with the company but my dealings with them have been very cordial.

Hope this helps on the original request for WinchRite information.

Les
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Old 15-09-2010, 15:09   #24
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Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, Les.

Thanks for your “experienced” review of the “WinchRite”.
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Old 15-09-2010, 18:55   #25
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I have the Milwaukee Tools R/A drill and the winch bit and I find I use the drill function almost as much as I use the winch function. I do agree that it is heavy and the 28 volt battery sometimes gets in the way when you are drilling. But IMHO it was some of the wiser money I spent.

And oh yes team McLube rules for lube jobs or practically anything else. My main tracks start to stick after a couple of months but just a few squirts and almost as good as new. It is really great with a full trip to the top of the mast, the sail almost goes up by itself! We had our last headsail coated with it and it not only stays cleaner but it seems to furl easier as well.

No affiliation with either company except Iwish I would have bought stock in them early on!

Cheers

Mark
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Old 16-09-2010, 05:36   #26
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I took the advice of this forum earlier this year and bought the Milwaukee 28 volt & winch bit. Works fantastic.
Last summer my elbows were really starting to hurt from tendinitis. No pain at all this year.
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Old 02-01-2011, 09:36   #27
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WinchRite

Having a back-up fully charged battery is necessary rather then waiting to recharge. Not sure from the specs if that's possible with the WinchRite. That is why I like the Winch Buddy with a back-up battery.
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Old 02-01-2011, 17:04   #28
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After a days use of the Winchrite I just plug it into the 12 volt charging socket on the boat and leave it there until the next time out. It has never let me down through lack of power. My main use is sail raising and going up the mast both of which can now be done by my wife. It is very reasuring to be able to check everything aloft on a regular basis particularly as I had my forestay break a couple of years back.
A significant design advantage of the WR is that you can leave it lying around the deck whilst sailing well heeled, it just sticks anywhere and being flat doesn't get in the way.
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Old 24-01-2011, 03:07   #29
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After reading all the information on this thread, including the many posting that have nothing to do with the original question (why do threads go off track so much?) I decided to give the Winchrite a try. Not keen on a oversize cordless drill that is not waterproof, very heavy and cumbersome.

They are not available as yet here in Australia so I had to contact Sailology.

They in turn directed me to a company called "Sailing PFD"

The standard of service from this company should be a lesson to a large number of suppliers and chandleries here in Australia.

Needless to say, we now have our Winchrite and after giving it a workout, believe that this is truly a product worthy of the awards it has been given.

My wife suffers from extreme arthritis of the hands and has very little power or grip. I have extreme back problems and a fused L1/S4.

Our yacht has seven winches to operate, for the cost of the Winchrite landed here ($662 Aud) I have effectively electrified seven winches for less than $100 per winch. Now that's value for money.

It appears to be able to operate all day without losing power, charges through a 12v cig. lighter outlet and doesn't look like a tradesman has left his drill behind for me to abscond with it.

If like me, you are not as yoyng and as fit as you used to be, give it a serious look at.

Ken
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Old 25-01-2011, 12:30   #30
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Get-a-life, I'm not sure that "many of the postings have nothing to do with the original question". Rather, they include suggestions for an alternate set-up that it more powerful and cheaper. They also make clear that these devices shouldn't be seen as a cure for all ills - in particular, a sticky mainsail. Indeed, with either the Winchrite or Milwaukee, it is worth noting that without correcting underlying problems, the increased torque over a manual winch could lead to damage to the sail.

Brad
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