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Old 28-07-2012, 22:22   #1
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hunter yachts :'(

I have a bias towards the brand despite it being American. The new ones look like junk (to sail) and seem to be designed as a marina queen/daysailor. Most yacht reviews don't critique any thing and so make it impossible to really know the boat (although I have sailed on one).
So what do you guys think of em, as A SAILBOAT?
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Old 28-07-2012, 23:03   #2
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Just picked up a new hunter e33. I'm with you on your points that they're made to a lesser quality. Although I do think the look has been for the better, but that's just my eye.

Speaking to sail worthiness, I'm overall impressed with the speed and feel; and I'm coming from power boats. Typically I average 5-6 knts but have gotten just over 7 with nice gusts. Have not yet equipped a spinnaker and have an in mast furling so my main is batten-less and quite small; will not sail on main alone. The jib is on a furling and is quite large, sailing downwind on that alone produced decent speeds. With the shoal keel, drawing 4 ft 6 in, heeling happens more often than I'd like but reefing is quite easy. Encountered gusts in the 25-30 knt range and was not uncomfortable after reefing down past 50% sail area. The 29 hp auxiliary helps nicely too coming out at about 6.5 knts at 3000 rpms. all sheets are led back to the helm so single handing is a piece of cake. Everything cockpit wise is laid out nicely and the comings are nice and high for added safety.

Speaking to dock side use; been great so far. Interior is laid out nicely and am comfortable even with a few guests overnight.

My overall thoughts; While I would have loved a beneteau or even a moody, for that price point and simplicity you can't get better.
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Old 28-07-2012, 23:18   #3
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That "price point", I assume means the cost of the new boat. Since I sail a 40ft boat, that's the size I'm going to compare. Now, a new 40ft hunter is about 200k, so let's compare the used boats you could get for that: 5-10 year old tartan 4000/3700. With this you get vacuum bagging, epoxy resins, carbon spars and tartan quality and performance. Your going to get a boat thats as strong as anything out there, and more luxurious than the hunter. Boats also in this range used would entail island packet, grand soleil, x yachts, sabre, arcona finngulf etc..... Incredible boats, just happen to be lightly sailed....like they should.be.
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Old 28-07-2012, 23:30   #4
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Yes I agree that boats mature after a few years of getting the kinks out and there's something to be said about quality for sure, there is no comparison between tartan and hunter.
Sometimes the new boat idea is more overpowering that other considerations. Honestly, I couldn't find one in the 5 year old range that fit into my budget. Going down in size was not an option so I had to sacrifice other important considerations. My cruising plans include long island sound and not much farther, weekend trips and slip to slip legs are all I need.
One day I'm hopefully going to get one of the boats you mentioned, but for now, I'm content.
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Old 29-07-2012, 05:01   #5
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Re: hunter yachts :'(

Hy Hunter 410 sails great , is easy to handle, comfortable at sea and port, is very well constructed! In fact there is nothing about it that I would change for the size of the boat. The larger Hunters I'm sure are different than smaller ones, because there is no "lesser quality" in mine.

Other than that all this thread is just a troll to trash a boat line!
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Old 29-07-2012, 05:53   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Lucas
Hy Hunter 410 sails great , is easy to handle, comfortable at sea and port, is very well constructed! In fact there is nothing about it that I would change for the size of the boat. The larger Hunters I'm sure are different than smaller ones, because there is no "lesser quality" in mine.

Other than that all this thread is just a troll to trash a boat line!
Certainly not here to trash hunter, after all I did just buy a new one for a reason, but that reason was more about price than quality. There's obviously a reason why they're less expensive, because materials used are cheaper. I wasn't concerned about crossing oceans so this quality I speak of really doesn't make a difference to me.
From my personal and ongoing experience, it's in no way the Mercedes Benz of the sailboat world, more along the lines of Chrysler. And not trashing that either, but as they say, you get what you pay for.
On the flip side, I'm very happy with my boat and do not regret my purchase, I knew what I wanted and it fit the bill.
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Old 29-07-2012, 06:07   #7
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Re: hunter yachts :'(

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Lucas View Post
Hy Hunter 410 sails great , is easy to handle, comfortable at sea and port, is very well constructed! In fact there is nothing about it that I would change for the size of the boat. The larger Hunters I'm sure are different than smaller ones, because there is no "lesser quality" in mine.

Other than that all this thread is just a troll to trash a boat line!
I have sailed on Dons boat,,,,it had a VERY good build quality,,,,had a great nights sleep, more room than you could use.,,,,,,sailed like a dream,,
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Old 29-07-2012, 06:30   #8
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Re: hunter yachts :'(

I had a 1983 Hunter 34. I loved it. I upgraded to a Hudson Force 50, but I miss my Hunter. It was a great boat in which to learn sailing. It took plenty of abuse. It had the fin keel, so it turned on a dime. It hit heavy weather and the only thing that was ever broken was the spirit of the captain. She never failed me. I miss my Hunter. :-(

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Old 29-07-2012, 06:43   #9
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I don't own a Hunter, so maybe I should mind my own business. I have noticed a couple threads where Hunters are spoken of as less than ideal sailboats. What a bunch of BS.

There are Hunters at my docks. Wonderful sailboats. To my eye (make a good living as an artist) a Hunter sailboat is very nice looking. I have a Hunter 33 down a couple slips. His Catalina 30 caught fire last fall down to the water. To my knowledge, they are pleased with the Hunter. When I look to trade up to something newer someday, a Hunter sailboat is first on my list.

For folks that have chosen to go another brand, wonderful. Always good to hear stories about all brands of sailboats. That is how I happened into this thread. However, posts that come straight point blank saying one brand of sailboat is no good, really should not be allowed. I can read those posts on this site about my sailboat. One such post is from a moderator! Those posts are hurtful and do nothing to promote sailing.
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Old 29-07-2012, 06:46   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by medicrene
I had a 1983 Hunter 34. I loved it. I upgraded to a Hudson Force 50, but I miss my Hunter. It was a great boat in which to learn sailing. It took plenty of abuse. It had the fin keel, so it turned on a dime. It hit heavy weather and the only thing that was ever broken was the spirit of the captain. She never failed me. I miss my Hunter. :-(

The Witchdoctor
I wish I could say the same. Yes I know that all boats have issues and this is certainly not my first rodeo but I've had an abundance of service, maintenance and warranty issues since day one.

Without getting into the finer details, some of these issues could have been very bad for my well being if it were not for quick reactions on my part. I blame partly my dealership, whom was useless, part hunter for not addressing issues, and part myself for sacrificing quality for price.

There is no way around the simple fact that all things equal, hunter is not comparable to let's say island packet. They're built to different standards, cost more because better materials, etc... Only a few months old and things are falling apart.

Not all hate from me though; I'm happy with my purchase and do not regret it, because in the end it's what I need, a solid coastal cruiser that's easy to sail and didn't kill my funds. It's very comfortable on the water and at port and I hope to keep her for years to come.

Next time around though; I'm going to up the ante.
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Old 29-07-2012, 06:50   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryMayo
I don't own a Hunter, so maybe I should mind my own business. I have noticed a couple threads where Hunters are spoken of as less than ideal sailboats. What a bunch of BS.

There are Hunters at my docks. Wonderful sailboats. To my eye (make a good living as an artist) a Hunter sailboat is very nice looking. I have a Hunter 33 down a couple slips. His Catalina 30 caught fire last fall down to the water. To my knowledge, they are pleased with the Hunter. When I look to trade up to something newer someday, a Hunter sailboat is first on my list.

For folks that have chosen to go another brand, wonderful. Always good to hear stories about all brands of sailboats. That is how I happened into this thread. However, posts that come straight point blank saying one brand of sailboat is no good, really should not be allowed. I can read those posts on this site about my sailboat. One such post is from a moderator! Those posts are hurtful and do nothing to promote sailing.
Just giving my honest opinion, I certainly am not here to trash the brand that I chose.
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Old 29-07-2012, 07:43   #12
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Re: hunter yachts :'(

I have a 2003 H356 I bought new and have spent 688 days on. I have had almost no items that have broken since it was commissioned. I have sailed it on Kentucky Lake in 25 to 30 knot winds and am not bashful about saiing in weather other people shy away from. There is no comparison between Kentucky Lake and open ocean.

I have sailed an Island Packet 38, 380 and 40 in Southwest Florida from Punta Gorda to Key West and the Dry Tortugas on numerous occassions. I also went with 3 other guys and took a Cabo Rico 38 from Kentucky Lake down the Tenn Tom waterway to Punta Gorda - out at Pensacola and offshore to Punta Gorda. All these boats sailed well offshore and we have been in some pretty rough seas and wave heights on one sail in the 10 foot range where we motored against 25 knot winds on the nose to Key West on a leg from the Dry Tortugas to Key West.

I plan on taking my boat down to Florida either this fall or next and spend the winter there. The major differences between the boats is the Hunter is less rigid than the IP and Cabo Rico. In wallowing seas, the Hunter will twist some and I have not seen that in the IP and Cabo Rico. It is just another way that energy is dissipated. The larger Hunters have gone offshore for years without problems. My cockpit and area down below is outfitted for comfort both at the dock and offshore.

I don't ascribe to the theory that you have to be uncomfortable to be a sailor! Most of the time in a sailboat is spent at the dock or at anchor. As long as the boat will get you there without coming apart or causing you undue discomfort during the crossing, the interior volumne and comforts then become the primary concern. I will take my Hunter over the IP and Cabo Rico anytime. Mine is more comfortable and I am not worried about it not holding up. I don't have any desire to go to Bora Bora and if I did, I might consider something else. It wouldn't be any of the boats I have been on so far.
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Old 29-07-2012, 07:44   #13
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Re: hunter yachts :'(

One problem I have with these threads, is the same problem I see in "blue water" type threads....I see a lot of theory, but little facts.


Fact??? Has anyone direct or provable experience with a modern production boat, (even a Hunter), undergoing hull failure under extreme conditions?? Minor flexing, or cracking may be worrysome, but doesn't count unless severe enough that the boat sank.

Fact??? Has anyone had direct experience of rigging failure due to under sized rigging, (not from unresolved maintenence).

Fact??? Has anyone actual statistics of number of times fin keeled boats were rolled during breaking waves compaired to full keeled boats in same storm???

Fact?? Has anyone data that supports increased Hull failures with decreasing hull thickness associated with modern design methods?

Without facts all we have are opinions.

I may have unwarranted faith in modern engineering, but I can't see a manufacturer risking everything, on what will certanly be massive lawsuits, and negative publicity over saving a few bucks during production.
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Old 29-07-2012, 07:59   #14
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Re: hunter yachts :'(

Quote:
Originally Posted by capn_billl View Post
One problem I have with these threads, is the same problem I see in "blue water" type threads....I see a lot of theory, but little facts.


Fact??? Has anyone direct or provable experience with a modern production boat, (even a Hunter), undergoing hull failure under extreme conditions?? Minor flexing, or cracking may be worrysome, but doesn't count unless severe enough that the boat sank.

Fact??? Has anyone had direct experience of rigging failure due to under sized rigging, (not from unresolved maintenence).

Fact??? Has anyone actual statistics of number of times fin keeled boats were rolled during breaking waves compaired to full keeled boats in same storm???

Fact?? Has anyone data that supports increased Hull failures with decreasing hull thickness associated with modern design methods?

Without facts all we have are opinions.

I may have unwarranted faith in modern engineering, but I can't see a manufacturer risking everything, on what will certanly be massive lawsuits, and negative publicity over saving a few bucks during production.

Facts don't usually change some peoples' misperceptions. Added to that are the so-called internet experts and you have a breeding ground for people who want to sound like they know things they don.t

A couple of folks here implied a lack of quality in Hunters - that they expressed not one specific is telling. These generalities are just that and as with all generalities, should be dismissed outright.

I've written about this before - that while sitting in some backwater Pacific island motu with a bunch of other cruisers, we were all complaining about boat maintenance issues, breakdowns, lack of storage, etc... regardless of the name on the boat plate. Not one of these experienced cruisers ever criticized a specific brand or model although there was a consensus that the so-called "gold platers" always seemed to suffer the most breakdowns and required the most maintenance.

Anyone who criticizes a general brand shows only their lack of knowledge.
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Old 29-07-2012, 09:01   #15
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Re: hunter yachts :'(

Quote:
Originally Posted by capn_billl View Post
One problem I have with these threads, is the same problem I see in "blue water" type threads....I see a lot of theory, but little facts.


Fact??? Has anyone direct or provable experience with a modern production boat, (even a Hunter), undergoing hull failure under extreme conditions?? Minor flexing, or cracking may be worrysome, but doesn't count unless severe enough that the boat sank.

Hull flexing or cracking dont sink a boat, but in the long term can weak the structure, hulls are designed to flex or work in a seaway but some designs twist and flex more than others, in other words a excesive flexing hull can distort cabinets , doors, bulkheads and in some cases allow rigging to work loose, Beneteaus are famous for bottom distortion at the chainplate area , simply because the laminate is thin and the grid is glued not laminated to the hull, can break in extreme conditions?? probably not, but is not funy to see the oil canning around chainplates laminate.

Fact??? Has anyone had direct experience of rigging failure due to under sized rigging, (not from unresolved maintenence).

A reputable rigger here without safety factors and stability numbers say that the wire size can be same as chainplate thicknes , probably is just a rigger opinion, but in any case yes i see 2 set of spreaders long tall mast in a new production boat suported with 8 mm wire size in the uppers and 6 in the lowers , probably fine, im not the designer, but close inspection to a similar boat with almost same mast design sport 10mm in uppers and 8 in lowers .
I mean this is just observations , not meaning that the mast with 8 and 6 mm is not properly designed , again the designer have the reason to choose 8 instead of 10, what i see is many dismastings are caused by improperly designs fittings , like shroud tangs , tangs bolts must have their nuts drilled for a cotter pin , internal shroud tangs are dificult to inspect and sometimes a crack make the diference , thin spreaders sections , or BS chainplate design like the IP configuration.
New Hunters lack of a Backstay thanks to the B&R rig , to me this sounds lame and weird , just downwind is a pain in the ass, putting a lot of stress on the uppers and chainplates , i cant imagine a rig like this in 40+ and big seas or pounding to hell.
Fact??? Has anyone actual statistics of number of times fin keeled boats were rolled during breaking waves compaired to full keeled boats in same storm???

Designs and stabilty factors make the diference , not the keel, in my opinion.

Fact?? Has anyone data that supports increased Hull failures with decreasing hull thickness associated with modern design methods?


If you want i post here a bunch of pictures showing laminate failures in some new production boats , we have the boatyard full of fiberglass projects.
A brand new Orana with a masive Crack in the underbody, a beneteau 50 with a 24 inch crack close to the port side waterline,
and a Irwin with internal grids loose from the hull or a Catana with cracks at dagerboards or the Kirie feeling with masive cracks around keel inside and outside after a grounding .
I cant blame the laminate thicknes or the quality of materials , but close inspection at a truhull hole in the Beny in the keel laminate area showing just 1cm of FB thicknes , and in the chainplate area is the same , the builder have a strong faith in the grid system, i understand now the oil caning effect at the chainplate hull side ,
same history in a charter based Catana after a grounding , can you imagine a Catana grounded with dagerboards upp?? well it happen here in St Marteen and the guy who grind the damage area show me just 5 mm of laminate between foam blocks , this boats are fast but with a price.
Without facts all we have are opinions.

I may have unwarranted faith in modern engineering, but I can't see a manufacturer risking everything, on what will certanly be massive lawsuits, and negative publicity over saving a few bucks during production.
Best regards.
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