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Old 27-03-2019, 14:16   #1
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Gasoline vs Gas Detector

So on my American Mariner 24' I have an internal gasoline tank. I understand the danger and the risk, so I have a 2 1/2 gal portable tank that I use in the lake (after the first couple of trips when I realized the issue). I liked using the internal tank and not having this big red tank in the cockpit. So, I was thinking of going back to the internal and installing a gasoline detector to warn of any fumes etc….

I have found the Xintex Gasoline Fume Detector & Alarm w/Plastic Sensor and the Safe T Alert Gas Fume Vapor Detector. I am not 100% sure that the Safe T Alert detects gasoline fumes and I have no knowledge of either system. Has anyone used one of these or has another suggestion? Maybe there is one that detects both?

Or is the risk/danger just to high even with a detector?

https://www.hodgesmarine.com/Xintex-Gasoline-Fume-Detector-Alarm-W-Plastic-p/xing-1b-r.htm?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIkb2R2puj4QIVSV8NCh3a4gR0EA kYAyABEgILFfD_BwE&click=19

https://www.ecmarinesupply.com/products/safe-t-alert-gas-fume-vapor-detector-in-dash-2-instrument-case-black?variant=45758441418
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Old 27-03-2019, 14:47   #2
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Re: Gasoline vs Gas Detector

Most power boats have gas engines, many with internal tanks. By USCG registration reports maybe 5% of the boats out there are sailboats. So the vast majority manage to not blow up.

Make sure your tank is installed to safety standards, sniff the bilge for fumes, run the blower the appropriate amount of time.

I always sniffed the blower exit for gas fumes as well. Spent 20+ years sailing a friend's Cal with Atomic 4 with no problem, but never skimped on the safety procedures.

All that said an electronic device won't hurt, but I would not stop using my nose.
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Old 27-03-2019, 16:25   #3
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Re: Gasoline vs Gas Detector

Ensure that the tank is not leaking. Not uncommon for an old tank to develop leaks. Easily done with your nose if you have a normal sense of smell. An electronic sniffer is a good back up but wouldn't be my first line of defense.

Most importantly, always use the blower system. If it doesn't have a blower system install one. Good idea to have one even if you are using an external tank. Just to be clear the blower motor should be set up to suck (exhaust) fumes out not blow air in. Run the blower for several minutes before trying to start the engine to be sure any explosive vapors are sucked out.
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Old 28-03-2019, 03:58   #4
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Re: Gasoline vs Gas Detector

Safe-T-Alert "SA-1" detects both Gasoline & Propane fumes, and more.


Power Supply - 12 VDC Operational Voltage - 7 to 15 VDC
Power Draw -.200 amps @ 14 VDC
Operating Temp -220 F - 1600 F
Alarm Threshold - <20% LEL of Gasoline and Propane
Other gases detected but not listed; Alcohol, Acetone, Hydrogen and most other flammable gases
http://productimageserver.com/litera...al/61263OM.pdf
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Old 28-03-2019, 09:22   #5
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Re: Gasoline vs Gas Detector

Cal40john, never thought about it that way. I just read something one day (on this site) where a few people stated that they would not even allow gasoline on their boat, then realized one day I have gasoline setting in a tank in the bilge.

Roverhi, I pulled the tank out in 2014 (when I bought the boat) cleaned and inspected it. Then again last summer when I emptied the tank. But, good point to always check each trip. I will install a blower, thanks for the advise (Cal40 too).

GordMay, that was the information I was looking for, thank you for the technical information. The website selling these things were very limited on the information. Since I spent most of my time in a lake, I do not have a large house bank (only about 100 ah).

And the combine information is to install a blower and keep an eye for leaks and a nose for the fumes.

Thank you all for the help. Once again CF has come through.
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Old 28-03-2019, 13:01   #6
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Re: Gasoline vs Gas Detector

I believe you are talking about an internal tank with an outboard motor. In that case there's no need to run a blower before starting the motor. In fact the only time you would need a blower is when you have a gas leak which should never happen if you maintain the tank & hoses. However, the sniff test is still crucial & should be performed every time you get on the boat. I would install the fuel filter/water separator in a cockpit locker or on the transom.
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Old 29-03-2019, 09:44   #7
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Re: Gasoline vs Gas Detector

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scout 30 View Post
I believe you are talking about an internal tank with an outboard motor. In that case there's no need to run a blower before starting the motor. In fact the only time you would need a blower is when you have a gas leak which should never happen if you maintain the tank & hoses. However, the sniff test is still crucial & should be performed every time you get on the boat. I would install the fuel filter/water separator in a cockpit locker or on the transom.
You are correct, internal tank and outboard motor. Good advice on the filter / water separator. I have thought a couple of time of adding one, just never got around to doing it. Thank you
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