Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 18-02-2011, 08:12   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 37
What Foul Weather Gear to Get ?

Hey everyone. Im going to start working on a tall ship in early March and Ill be there for 6 or so months. What Im wondering is what weather gear">foul weather gear to get. Ill be in the midatlantic region working near the coast. Ive got lots of rain gear left over from numerous hiking trips but I know that doesnt qualify as foul weather gear. If any one has any advice on the type, desirable characteristics, or even a brand of foulies i would be very appreciative.

Thanks
__________________

__________________
Soundtrackzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-02-2011, 08:28   #2
Registered User
 
Mark1977's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Halifax, N.S Canada
Boat: Tanzer 26, Walk22
Posts: 930
I would recommend NORTH 66 brand. I fish off shore in the winter and summer , it's all i use. Its light and lasts along time in harsh conditions.
__________________

__________________
Mark1977 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-02-2011, 08:34   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 37
I should mention that this job pays very little, so cost is a serious consideration.
__________________
Soundtrackzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-02-2011, 08:35   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,949
I like the Grundens stuff that a lot of commercial fishermen use. It is tough, simple, and reasonably priced.
__________________
Kettlewell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-02-2011, 08:39   #5
Registered User
 
Mark1977's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Halifax, N.S Canada
Boat: Tanzer 26, Walk22
Posts: 930
The North 66 stuff isn't to bad about 80 for the jacket and 80 for the pants. Working on a tall ship and not fishing these would be the only ones you would ever buy. I like all the Henrie Loyd stuff at the yacht shop, holds up while sailing and looks great but i would not try it in a hard working environment.
__________________
Mark1977 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-02-2011, 08:40   #6
Registered User
 
Mark1977's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Halifax, N.S Canada
Boat: Tanzer 26, Walk22
Posts: 930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kettlewell View Post
I like the Grundens stuff that a lot of commercial fishermen use. It is tough, simple, and reasonably priced.
Grundens are great too..
__________________
Mark1977 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-02-2011, 08:40   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Puget Sound, USA
Boat: Lyman-Morse 54
Posts: 206
Disclaimer: I missed your cost comment until after I posted this, so take it with a grain of salt.

Having gone through this exercise recently myself, I tried Musto, Gill, Henry Lloyd, West Marine and Slam brands of wetgear. I found that for my body (shorter legs and arms, longer torso and larger around the chest) that the Henry Lloyd gear fit me better than the rest. If you look at the different brands sizing charts, you can see why. Luckily the Henry Lloyd gear is also very well made, so I didn't have to compromise on quality.

Then it went to features. I wanted a tall collar with a fleece or microfiber lining, neoprene or rubber at the wrists to keep water from running down my arms when my arms are raised (happens more often than I would think), fleece lined pockets I can put my hands in when wearing my lifejacket, and a hood that was easy to deploy and stow. I also didn't want a smock style jacket, I find them to be fine for dinghy racing but too hard to get on and off and too hard to modulate temperature.

In looking at Henry Lloyd's offerings, I found their offshore gear too bulky and restrictive (I wanted something I could race in as well as cruise) so I ultimately ended up with their TP2 Ventura jacket and have been extremely pleased with it. It met all my criteria listed above, and as an added bonus the hood on the jacket has flexible clear plastic sections to either side so that the hood does not impair your peripheral vision. While I originally thought that was just a gimmick, I find it very helpful and am really glad they have that.

As far as the bottom half, I would highly recommend bib or hi-fit style trowsers. If you go with regular trousers, every time you bend over or kneel down you expose your back and butt. They also tend to have nice fleece lined pockets and work really well stand alone when you don't need a full jacket but want to keep spray off of you, whether sailing or just washing the decks. I would also suggest reinforcement in the knees and butt, nonskid tends to chew up fabric over time and having some reinforcement in those spots will definitely increase the longevity of your gear.

Hope this helps...
__________________
Pyxis156 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-02-2011, 12:58   #8
Moderator
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 7,894
Images: 1
I don't know where you are now, but if I wanted the best I could have for the least cost; then, I would be shopping at the marine supply consignment and discount stores like Sailorman's in Fort Lauderdale; Sailor's Supply in St. Augustine or Bacon & Assoc. in Annapolis. There are places like this in all the big boating ports. Much good and expensive gear and equipment is recycled through places like these for half price or less.
__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-02-2011, 23:55   #9
Registered User
 
sww914's Avatar

Join Date: May 2009
Location: Punta De Mita
Boat: Vagabond 39 Hull # 1
Posts: 1,842
I learned recently that Gill's lifetime guarantee is for real. They sent me 2 brand new jackets to replace 2 that were almost 15 years old.
__________________
sww914 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-02-2011, 01:40   #10
Registered User

Join Date: May 2007
Location: New Zealand
Boat: Trismus 37
Posts: 760
I too have been impressed with Gills customer service, they replaced a set that had failed much earlier than I would have expected. Local importer was not much help but Gill Uk. were great. After sending photo's of the leaky suit they had another set out to me within a couple of weeks.
__________________
Steve Pope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-02-2011, 05:02   #11
Registered User
 
Ziggy's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: U.S., Northeast
Boat: Contessa 32
Posts: 1,421
Images: 2
+1 on the Grundens recommendation. From my personal experience, ordinary hiking rain gear always seems to always leak in a real deluge, and Grundens will keep you dry. It's loose cut, so lack of breathability does not seem much of a problem unless you're engaged in a prolonged and strenuous activity. If you have a light Goretex rainjacket and rain pants, bring them along also. They'll be great the other 98% of the time.
__________________
... He knows the chart is not the sea.
-- Philip Booth, Chart 1203
Ziggy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-02-2011, 23:06   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 37
does anyone know how breathable the North 66 stuff is? Thats a lot of PVC and I imagine it would get pretty hot in there
__________________
Soundtrackzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-02-2011, 23:11   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 3,016
Images: 4
A tall ship? Well then, it's canvas oilskins or you are a sissy. No?
__________________
daddle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-02-2011, 23:59   #14
Registered User
 
Pyrate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Juneau, AK
Boat: Fortune 30
Posts: 105
I like Grundens, but as a cheaper alternative, try Carharts. They're not very breathable, but loose and give a bit of warmth. If it's warm out, then why bother with the foulies? You'll dry out eventually. Even with the best foulies, in a good blow or deluge you'll get wet anyway. Besides, nothing really gets very dry or stays dry in a salt water environment. Unless you have a stroke of great weather.

If the boat's a day sailor tour boat, then I wouldn't worry too much about foulies. A decent waterproof, tear resistant jacket will be enough for most days. If you're sailing offshore for extended trips, then some warmer clothes might be necessary.

Which tall ship are you signing on to? I've sailed mainly west coast ships, but have had a chance to sail on a few east coasters. Had quite a few friends out that way as well.

Pyrate
__________________
Pyrate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-02-2011, 08:24   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 37
Re: What Foul Weather Gear to Get ?

Im working on Sultana in Maryland. Ill mainly be doing educational programs for students and the like so it wont be a ton of hard sailing but it beats sitting at a desk.
__________________

__________________
Soundtrackzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
gear, weather, foul weather gear

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good Foul Weather Gear For Warm Weather capcook Health, Safety & Related Gear 28 11-12-2009 08:16
For Sale: Foul Weather Gear SVMakai Classifieds Archive 3 16-11-2009 18:00
WTB: Foul Weather Gear Domusu Classifieds Archive 1 14-11-2009 12:00
Foul weather gear... sea-rat Monohull Sailboats 46 12-04-2008 21:47
Foul weather gear gambol General Sailing Forum 10 03-10-2007 05:05



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:24.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.