Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 25-06-2014, 03:43   #61
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Durban, South Africa
Boat: Montevideo 43'
Posts: 44
Re: Wet Suit

This is a bit like having a conversation about knifes and anchors.
I've been diving more than 40 years and still earn my living doing commercial diving all around the world. I've used all kinds of suits from rugby jerseys painted with latex (long time ago) to the real hitec warmwater suits. For anything thats not work specific I use a long john and a hooded top. I only use opencell neoprene suits. It feels like a latex glove on the inside and nylon on the outside. You do need a lubricant to get into it. This is actually great because I don't find any enjoyment getting into cold wet wetsuits. With the opencell wetsuit you just make your own mix and temp. These suits are really soft and flexible and spending 6 - 12 hours in them is no problem. Like boatman said, you just flush them with more warm water when you get a bit cool. This also helps getting rid of the lion cage smell.
I usually buy a new 3mm suit at the beginning of winter. The water is mild on South Africa's east coast, maybe 18 - 20C in winter. We hunt fish fairly deep, sometimes more than 30m and the suit will collapse over time. When summer arrives this collapsed suit is great. You can freedive with about 1,5 - 2kg weightbelt. Ive got a whole collection of suits but on the yacht I keep a fairly new 3mm opencell wetsuit.
When you get out of the water you can just dry the inside of the suit with a towel and maybe give it a wipe with fresh water. You really don't need to use buckets full of fresh water.
__________________

__________________
Downline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-06-2014, 06:40   #62
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: W Carib
Boat: Wildcat 35, Hobie 33
Posts: 7,909
Re: Wet Suit

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
I used a shortie and a "thin skin". (long sleeves, long legs)The thin skin ended up being used all the time... bottom cleaning, snorkeling etc. Kept me warmer for long trips and was nice to provide a little protection from jellyfish etc. Didnt require weight to counteract flotation either.
I keep a couple of skins in my gear too. Just enough to protect you from scrapes and jellies without restricting movement or adding bouyancy.

I used to do a LOT of diving and had a couple of different wet suits, now I just refuse to go places where a wet suit is required. Haven't been in or on the water above 17N in almost a decade.
__________________

__________________
belizesailor is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 25-06-2014, 06:48   #63
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: W Carib
Boat: Wildcat 35, Hobie 33
Posts: 7,909
Re: Wet Suit

Quote:
Originally Posted by shorebird View Post
Well, I've seen people get hyperthermic in a wetsuit, usually waiting for a dive in 100 deg heat during summer.
Yep, used to watch over anxious students do that when I did dive master work. They would suit up way to soon and then proceed to get both hyperthermic and sea sick...not a fun day for them.

You can also go hypothermic even in warm water...it just takes a long time. A diver, w/out wet suit, died of hypothermia in Belize a few years ago due to a series of bad decisions that resulted in her being in the water for 48 hours. Three other guys (more body mass + wet suits) in the same incident survived.
__________________
belizesailor is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 25-06-2014, 12:02   #64
֍֎֍֎֍֎֍֎֍֎

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 13,022
Re: Wet Suit

It seems like "opencell neoprene" is a mainly South African misnomer for "unlined" neoprene, with all neoprene being closed cell. If you can't breath through it--it is closed cell. If you can't literally pour a cup of water through it--it is closed cell.

That's just the way that neoprene is foamed and formed into wetsuit materials. Unlined, which sometimes is called "sharkskin" because it is textured on the outside, is the stretchiest, but a lycra lining on a nitrogen-foamed neoprene is still pretty stretchy.

I was taught to dive in an old conservative program by a former WW2 frogman. And we were taught that if you need a wetsuit, of any kind, you're doing cold water diving, to use the cold water tables not the regular USN dive tables. Except, no one I met had ever heard of that. Until I asked a USN diving medical officer about it one day, and he said "Absolutely correct." Apparently all or nearly all of the NE US sport diving industry had been diving with the wrong tables for decades, and no one wanted to comment on the emperors fine new wardrobe.

Now of course everyone says "The computer will do that....". Ahuh. One more fine piece of electronics to leak, run out of batteries, or be recalled.

NOAA and the DoD still require the use of J-valves for tanks. That same sport diving industry has actually banned them as unsafe, and refuses to sell, maintain, or deal with them as well.

So much for good information from "industries" that also sell wetsuits.
__________________
hellosailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-06-2014, 15:29   #65
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Durban, South Africa
Boat: Montevideo 43'
Posts: 44
Re: Wet Suit

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
It seems like "opencell neoprene" is a mainly South African misnomer for "unlined" neoprene, with all neoprene being closed cell. If you can't breath through it--it is closed cell. If you can't literally pour a cup of water through it--it is closed cell.

That's just the way that neoprene is foamed and formed into wetsuit materials. Unlined, which sometimes is called "sharkskin" because it is textured on the outside, is the stretchiest, but a lycra lining on a nitrogen-foamed neoprene is still pretty stretchy.

I was taught to dive in an old conservative program by a former WW2 frogman. And we were taught that if you need a wetsuit, of any kind, you're doing cold water diving, to use the cold water tables not the regular USN dive tables. Except, no one I met had ever heard of that. Until I asked a USN diving medical officer about it one day, and he said "Absolutely correct." Apparently all or nearly all of the NE US sport diving industry had been diving with the wrong tables for decades, and no one wanted to comment on the emperors fine new wardrobe.

Now of course everyone says "The computer will do that....". Ahuh. One more fine piece of electronics to leak, run out of batteries, or be recalled.

NOAA and the DoD still require the use of J-valves for tanks. That same sport diving industry has actually banned them as unsafe, and refuses to sell, maintain, or deal with them as well.

So much for good information from "industries" that also sell wetsuits.
No, opencell is not really a South African misnomer. When you cut a piece of neoprene and then have a close look at the area where you cut it, you will notice that the little closed cells formed during the manufacturing process are now open. Like a ball cut in half. It is these little spaces that give these wetsuits great properties. Its soft,no chafe.
If you don't like the dive computers, have a look at the DCIEM tables.
__________________

__________________
Downline is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:18.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.