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Old 27-01-2006, 22:43   #1
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Exclamation Seasickness & Prevention

Knowing how seasickness affects people differently. I ran across this just a few weeks back. Has anybody heard of " SwissTech Tempest Sunglasses."

IF YOUR TUMMY TURNS AROUND AND AROUND...

The SwissTech Tempest Sunglasses that combat seasickness, are one of the most innovative seasickness prevention tools on the market today.

The first symptoms of seasickness (perspiration, paleness, nausea) generally arise when the boat begins listing in turbulent seas. One sees the bridge of the boat inclining, and the horizon moving from side to side.

This happens perceptually, while the inner ear remains horizontal whatever the movement of the head. These two pieces of information - visual perception and labyrinth perception - enter into conflict without being able to find a resolution. This sensorial conflict is at the origin of seasickness.


The Tempest glasses "trick" the visual perception aspect of this phenomenon to make the inner ear always "see" a level, stable horizon, thus relieving the conflict and keeping nausea from coming on. The glasses come in two sizes, adult and children (sometimes the children's glasses fit comfortably on an adult woman), and clip-ons for those who wear glasses.

Price per pair is : Price: $131.00 Comes in Red, Black, & Brown.

The Clip-on!

The SwissTech-Tempest Glasses that protect against seasickness are now available as "clip-ons". For those of us who have to wear glasses with special, personalized optical measurements, the clip-ons are a best choice.

Made of the same durable construction and material as the framed SwissTech-Tempest Glasses, the clip-ons work in the same manner as the regular glasses in stabilizing the horizon and in so doing, prevent seasickness.

Price per pair : $155.00

Children's come in Blue, & Gray. Price per pair : $105.00

http://www.swisstech-america.com/tempestglasses.html
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Old 27-01-2006, 23:30   #2
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Sounds like good logic. I have tried all sorts of stuff, but the only real solution for me is to avoid the things that cause the problem, i.e. alcahol, diesel fumes, power boats, greasy foods. Not too much to ask. The pressure bands seem to work well for crew I have had aboard.
For those who have not been subject to mal de mer, it has one difference from other afflictions. With most illnesses, you wish for pain to stop, or sinuses to clear, but with sea sickness, you wish for death.
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Old 27-01-2006, 23:37   #3
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Hey Kai.

Is "mal de mer," the most advance form of seasickness? And if not. Is this something akin to regular seasickness?

Hey this'll be my 400th post. WOW!!!
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Old 27-01-2006, 23:46   #4
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Just another name for it.
Congrats! Happy 400th
Another interesting thing about sea sickness, for most people, it goes away in a few days. Not for me. I have photos from an expedition where I am literally green. After 10 days of beong seasick, including 12 hours on land where the symptoms did not subside, I determined that I needed to stay off power boats.
Don't seem to get sick on sail boats. It has to do with the motion.
Sailing down wind is a similar motio to a power boat.
FWIW, the land sickness I get after a week or so on the water is every bit as bad as sea sickness. I wonder if the glasses would help that?
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Old 27-01-2006, 23:50   #5
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Don't know Kai. Suppose it wouldn't hurt to try them out.

And if it does help you out. Then, as preventive medicine for myself. I just might buy me one. Along with ginger. And that wristband thingy.
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Old 28-01-2006, 00:00   #6
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Ginger snaps work. Saltine crackers are another good solution. Don't know that I would spend that much on the glasses myself, as I seem to be able to manage my sea sickness, but for some it might work well. I do not use the wrist bands either because I can not handle having that sort of pressure on my wrists.
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Old 28-01-2006, 00:04   #7
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Hey Kai.

Didn't you say that those wristbands send a little electrical voltage through the skin?

Does the voltage, counteract the motion of the seas? And is that how the wristbands work?
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Old 28-01-2006, 00:14   #8
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THe ones I am talking about use pressure points. I have heard of bands that use electrical current, but never seen them. The pressure bands are said to work very well, and I keep a set on my boat for seasick crew, but I put them on once, and could not get used to the feel.
Another factor in seasickness is apprehension. Many people who have never gotten seasick before get that way as they leave on their first long voyage. My worst experience, was my first. I did everything wrong, and payed the price. We had a big party before we left on an expedition. I drank quite a bit. My berth was on the main deck, backing on the galley. The vent for the galley was right outside my window, which was open all night. I was also right in line for the exhaust. As I was on the main deck, I was higher up on the vessel, so the motion was more severe. It went on from there, but I think I learned every possible thing NOT to do on that trip. By the way, watching someone prepare sushi when you are seasick is no fun. Follow that up with a little champagne with thee sushi dinner, and, well, there are few things worse.
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Old 28-01-2006, 00:21   #9
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Yeah, I can imagine about the sushi.

Sushi chief prepares the food. You're feeling the first symptoms of seasickness. Get a wiff of the sushi. And whatever you have been drinking. And that person will be meeting Raaaaalllllpppphhhh, (Ralph).
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Old 28-01-2006, 00:33   #10
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I left the galley well before that. Didn'y even get to try the fresh caught yellow tail
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Old 28-01-2006, 01:07   #11
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Back in 1977. Me, my father, and my uncle. Went to Morro Bay, California for a day long fishing trip.

We went out, on one of the fishing boats. Motor trawler type boat. And took us all out to sea, just off the coast from Morro Bay. I'd say around 5 miles or so out.

I watched some of the other children, getting seasick. And watched them tossing their cookies over the side. Later on, I did get a little seasick, that day. But, I fought back. I drank some 7-UP. And that settled my stomach. I was good as new.

I went about my fishing. And I won the fishing tourniment, that day. I caught the biggest fish. One of those Red Rock Cods. 15 pounder. And I won the pot of cash. That money went towards my first 10 speed bike. The one I kept badgering my father for.
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Old 28-01-2006, 01:10   #12
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Shoulda put it towards a boat
I never got seasick as a kid. My first bout was when I was 26 or 27
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Old 28-01-2006, 01:13   #13
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Well like they say.

The future is not written. Something like that?

Hey. How was I suppose to know how much I would like the sea, back then?

Back then, it was just a simple in - n - out fishing trip. And I never did return to do that. I can't seem to get anybody I know to come out on a trip like that? Freakin' cowards !!! Ahhhhhhhh!!!!

(Taking my chill pill here)
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Old 28-01-2006, 17:20   #14
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on my last (now infamous) outing, I tried a ginger supplement for a few days just in case. But not sure if they worked, as I later got too busy to keep it up.

Initially, I had a few problems below deck (nausea but no vomiting), which was limited to when I actually tried to do something that required, literally, focus. Even that seemed to go away after a few days though.
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Old 29-01-2006, 00:17   #15
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I was in a heavey sea that required life dependant concentration. I felt like I had a brick in my guts, but I just new I simply could not get seasick. My life depended on me keeping it all together in the situation I was in.
And of course, for those of us that have been seasick, I don't think there is a feeling worse and any more dibilitating. Once you get real sick, you just can't care less if the boat sunk right from under you. At least it felt that way for me on the one occasion I have been seasick.
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