Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 27-09-2012, 19:33   #1
Registered User
 
GreggL's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: NYC
Boat: Hunter E33
Posts: 194
Safety gear in cockpit

So I'm still outfitting my boat with all the necessary items that I would need to operate safely while coastal cruising. As of now I have a PLB, secondary handheld VHF, flares, horn, auto inflate pfd's with harness, tethers and jack lines, a few throwables, life raft and a safety throw line.

I always see the life sling bag on every cruisers boat, is this something I should look into as we'll? Am I missing anything important?

What's the best way to wear and store these items while underway to be able to be used properly and quickly?
__________________

__________________
GreggL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-09-2012, 19:42   #2
Registered User
 
Khagan1227's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Kansas City, MO
Boat: In the hunt again, unknown
Posts: 1,330
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreggL View Post
So I'm still outfitting my boat with all the necessary items that I would need to operate safely while coastal cruising. As of now I have a PLB, secondary handheld VHF, flares, horn, auto inflate pfd's with harness, tethers and jack lines, a few throwables, life raft and a safety throw line.

I always see the life sling bag on every cruisers boat, is this something I should look into as we'll? Am I missing anything important?

What's the best way to wear and store these items while underway to be able to be used properly and quickly?
If not a life sling bag, then you would do well to have "something" ready to go over the side and attached to the boat, if you have a MOB. A persons head is very hard to see in just a little chop. I like slings because they are generally out of the way and handy if you need them.

I like my PFDs inside the salon with a BRIGHT LED flashlight attached. We put them on anytime we are off shore before we go topside. Two people topside at night if one is going out of the cockpit on deck, and always tethered if leaving the cockpit. After what happen in last years 1500, I will probably insist on tethers to the jacklines as soon as one enters the cockpit.

P.S. The photograph in my avatar was taken at anchor in Bower's Harbor, MI
__________________

Khagan1227 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 07:08   #3
Registered User

Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 14
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

You say you have a PLB. If that is a personal locator beacon then they have generally been manufactured for use over land and people take them when going into isolated areas. They operate on the same digital 406 signal but they are not waterproof and immersion over 1 metre will render them useless. Better to have a 406 EPIRB as they are for marine use and are waterproof. PLBs are generally more expensive as well. I am in down under oz but the same should apply where you are I would imagine unless a EPIRB is called a PLB over there, but over here it is a different animal. Might need to check it out to ensure you have the right safety gear.
__________________
halberd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 07:18   #4
Senior Cruiser
 
Sailmonkey's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Houston
Boat: '76 Allied Seawind II, 32'
Posts: 5,787
I think you've got more than enough "stuff" already!!!

If you're comfortable with what you've got, then good. If not ask yourself specifically what Am i missing that makes me uncomfortable. If not having a lifesling is it, then go for it.

P.s. the plb is just fine, I've worn them clipped onto my life jacket for a few 300 mile offshore beach cat races.
__________________
Sailmonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 08:06   #5
Registered User
 
mbianka's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,125
Images: 1
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreggL View Post
So I'm still outfitting my boat with all the necessary items that I would need to operate safely while coastal cruising. As of now I have a PLB, secondary handheld VHF, flares, horn, auto inflate pfd's with harness, tethers and jack lines, a few throwables, life raft and a safety throw line.

I always see the life sling bag on every cruisers boat, is this something I should look into as we'll? Am I missing anything important?

What's the best way to wear and store these items while underway to be able to be used properly and quickly?
I would also add some whistles. One on each life jacket and one availible at the helm something as simple as a simple ACR rescue whistle:
THE BIANKA LOG BLOG: Gifts for Sailors this holiday SEAson.
I find I tend to use a whistle more to get some ones attention. Once you put it into your mouth you still can have full use of both hands. Unlike using a can of air or electric horn that you need to push to sound. Putting one on every life jacket is also good because people to not always go overboard in clear weather. Here is photo I took the other day. The boat in the first picture is about 200 feet away:
THE BIANKA LOG BLOG: A FOGGY MORNING ON THE MOORING
Good luck trying to find a person overboard in that type of weather just relying on a visual contact to find them.
__________________
Capt. Mike
mbianka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 08:42   #6
Marine Service Provider

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: On the Go
Boat: Various
Posts: 666
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

Related topic: I just met a woman of impressive dimensions who recently fell overboard in the Bay of Fundy. She was so embarrassed that it took four big men to get her back on board, she saw a doctor and is now dieting bigtime. She said it was her AHA moment and she is super motivated. A sling wouldn't have been as effective as those four he-men, LOL.
__________________
Janet Groene
JanetGroene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 08:49   #7
Registered User
 
Ziggy's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: U.S., Northeast
Boat: Contessa 32
Posts: 1,421
Images: 2
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

Many people would consider a sharp knife, preferably with a sheepsfoot or rounded tip, a safety item. I keep mine in my pocket, but you could also strap it to your steering pedestal.
__________________
... He knows the chart is not the sea.
-- Philip Booth, Chart 1203
Ziggy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 08:55   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,062
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

Quote:
Originally Posted by JanetGroene View Post
Related topic: I just met a woman of impressive dimensions who recently fell overboard in the Bay of Fundy. She was so embarrassed that it took four big men to get her back on board, she saw a doctor and is now dieting bigtime. She said it was her AHA moment and she is super motivated. A sling wouldn't have been as effective as those four he-men, LOL.
I considered this when I brought my elderly in-laws aboard and here is what I would do:

1) Lifesling; ask MOB to place the float around back and beneath armpits.
2) Rig a snatch block to end of boom or rigging (in my boat there is a suitable quick-link on the rigging about 6 feet above deck). If using boom-end you may need a second block at toe rail to route line near-horizontal to cockpit winch.
3) Run the lifesling line through the snatch block(s) to a cockpit winch.

edit: If the MOB was wearing a PFD with harness I might use the snubber or another line to lift the person by the harness ring. Also, it doesn't take long for cold water to sap a swimmer's strength -- so this isn't just for obese or out-of-shape crew.
__________________
SailFastTri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 09:13   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 2,438
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

What type of flares are you keeping in the cockpit? I used to keep my flare gun in the cockpit with a white flare in it. White is the only flare that can be fired off without explaining to the authorities why you are in distress, and if you are not in distress you might get a bill for the search and rescue ops that a red will cause. White is the ALERT(pay attention) signal that is legal to shoot if you have a vessel bearing down on you that doesnt respond to radio. It is far more likely to get the attention of some dog tired helmsman, than our puny little running lights are. A note on running lights! One year I left Bermuda late in the day and it happened to be when the Bermuda Racers were returning to the mainland, so we had 10 or 12 boats in sight. At dusk we still had 6 or 7 boats visible. A half hour after dark we could only see the running lights of 1 other boat, and I believe he had a masthead running light. I am sure that there were still many boats within a few mile radius, but running lights have much poorer visibility in the real world than they do when tested to meeet CG rules. Just something else to think about_____Grant.
__________________
gjordan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 09:21   #10
Registered User

Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,972
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

The Life Sling is by far the best way to recover a man overboard if you sail as a couple. The person remaining on board simply hits the MOB button on the chart plotter, throws the Life Sling over, and then sails in circles until the line pulls across the swimmer. Much easier for one person than other methods. You should also have the block and tackle to lift the person from the water once along side (and both you and your wife should try a full rescue)

And I think an AIS transponder is a critical piece of safety gear for anyone who does coastal cruising in areas with commercial traffic. I'd rank it well ahead of a liferaft.

Carl
__________________
CarlF is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2012, 07:47   #11
Registered User
 
GreggL's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: NYC
Boat: Hunter E33
Posts: 194
Thanks everyone. I'll certainly take your advice into consideration.
__________________
GreggL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2012, 09:31   #12
Senior Cruiser
 
jackdale's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 5,048
Images: 1
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

Quote:
Originally Posted by halberd View Post
You say you have a PLB. If that is a personal locator beacon then they have generally been manufactured for use over land and people take them when going into isolated areas. They operate on the same digital 406 signal but they are not waterproof and immersion over 1 metre will render them useless. Better to have a 406 EPIRB as they are for marine use and are waterproof. PLBs are generally more expensive as well. I am in down under oz but the same should apply where you are I would imagine unless a EPIRB is called a PLB over there, but over here it is a different animal. Might need to check it out to ensure you have the right safety gear.
ACR Aqualinks are waterproof and float. They are less expensive than EPIRBS. Their battery life is 24 hours, which is adequate for coastal cruising.
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203,204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2012, 09:46   #13
Senior Cruiser
 
rebel heart's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,190
Images: 3
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

Find a blend of safety without having all kinds of crap all over you. A cluttered cockpit is dangerous. Keep things simple, clean, and organized. I keep a canvas bucket on each lifeline (leeward/windward) clipped with a carabiner. Trash and gear go in them.

I take anything related to MOB and put it on top of the LifeSling (under the top flap). Open the flap, throw the auto lighting stuff out, chuck the sling out.
__________________
rebel heart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2012, 15:03   #14
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

If you have AIS onboard then an AIS MOB beacon is a great device - you will be able to find the guy even if they get out of sight and all ships will see your MOB immediatelly too.

I think it is a good idea to keep one flare close at hand (e.g. taped under a cockpit seat/locker door). Also, it is best to have an immediate access to the horn button.

Make sure there are enough and well distributed clip-in points in the cockpit - well backed with adequate plates. At least one of them should be placed so that a person coming up from down below can clip in from inside of the companionway.

b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2012, 16:04   #15
cruiser

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Tampa Bay area
Boat: Hunter 31'
Posts: 5,731
Re: Saftey gear in cockpit

Quote:
Originally Posted by SailFastTri View Post
I considered this when I brought my elderly in-laws aboard and here is what I would do:

1) Lifesling; ask MOB to place the float around back and beneath armpits.
2) Rig a snatch block to end of boom or rigging (in my boat there is a suitable quick-link on the rigging about 6 feet above deck). If using boom-end you may need a second block at toe rail to route line near-horizontal to cockpit winch.
3) Run the lifesling line through the snatch block(s) to a cockpit winch.

edit: If the MOB was wearing a PFD with harness I might use the snubber or another line to lift the person by the harness ring. Also, it doesn't take long for cold water to sap a swimmer's strength -- so this isn't just for obese or out-of-shape crew.

I keep two double blocks with my lifesling. I have to assume that someone who goes in the water may be injured, and if it's just me and the person in the water, I'm gonna need some purchase. I don't keep my lifesling strapped to the stern. I have a throwable horseshoe on a long line there. Lifeslings don't throw well at all.
__________________

__________________
Rakuflames is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cockpit, gear, safety

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 00:26.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.