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Old 19-09-2015, 09:04   #46
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Re: Most Important Safety Equipment

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Originally Posted by Jon Eisberg View Post
The list is neverending, of course...

But as to the "Most Important", that is the realization that you can't buy safety that should inform every consideration surrounding the matter...
Very good point, especially given the dizzying array of MOB-related "safety gear" you can buy these days. In the typical case of a cruising couple where only one person would be left onboard, how is that person supposed to try and keep the MOB in sight & turn the boat around while they're also busy throwing/releasing the pole, MOM-A, life ring, strobe light, throw line, etc., etc.?? And how many of these self-contained, sealed boxes of "safety gear" actually get serviced every year per the mfg.'s requirements? I had one (expensive) MOM-A simply disappear off the stern rail, another who's sealed container distorted from UV to the point of not being trustworthy, and a Lifesling who's pouch disintegrated after a couple of years, also on account of UV. Yes, you can now purchase an optional Sunbrella cover for an extra $100, but it's disconcerting that gear which is being marketed as indispensible for crew "safety" seems to be mfg. so cheaply. (By contrast, my simple horseshoe buoy has lived on my rail for the past 8 years with zero deterioration). I'm not even sure I trust the purpose-built webbing I bought for jacklines some years back. Seems like it color-faded after only a couple of offshore trips, and would be far too stretchy to prevent someone going over the rail.

In another related thread Kenomac recounted a real-life incident where he found his Lifesling indispensible for recovering a MOB (and the MOB's dog), so maybe one of those devices is a good idea after all. Then again, it's not clear that a similar recovery could not have been accomplished with a simpler throw line and maybe a life ring. A simple pole makes some sense, especially since it doesn't require periodic "servicing," but it seems odd to me that they don't seem to be offered with strobe lights on top.

In short, some of the array of so-called "safety" gear being offered may have some utility, but much of it seems either poorly constructed or otherwise unreliable in a pinch, and more importantly a potentially undesirable distraction from the more critical & pressing tasks of stopping the boat, getting turned around, marking the chartplotter, and most critically, tying to keep the MOB in sight. It is no wonder that more experienced cruisers tend to forego such purchases in favor of preventative measures, as pointed out in the Pardey article.
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Old 19-09-2015, 09:55   #47
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Re: Most Important Safety Equipment

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Originally Posted by Exile View Post
Very good point, especially given the dizzying array of MOB-related "safety gear" you can buy these days. In the typical case of a cruising couple where only one person would be left onboard, how is that person supposed to try and keep the MOB in sight & turn the boat around while they're also busy throwing/releasing the pole, MOM-A, life ring, strobe light, throw line, etc., etc.??

I know the "correct"answer is to eschew electronics, but this is exactly the prototypes of a personal ais/dsc device. It marks the mob on the plotter and keeps track of the person and direction while the other person manages the boat.

Mark
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Old 19-09-2015, 12:23   #48
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Re: Most Important Safety Equipment

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OMG, I can't believe some of the posts with equipment so far down the list of importance:

1. Good seamanship skills.
2. Good seamanship skills.
3. Good seamanship skills.

That's what you need.

The next most important safety gear, way down the list, at maybe item 3127, (all prior are "Good seasmanship skills") is properly installed and working communication equipment.

(Of all of the boats we inspect, you wouldn't believe the high percentage of poor quality radio installations.)

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I might be mistaken, but I think the OP was looking for unconventional safety equipment, so many of the early posts listed damage control equipment. The reasoning being, if you're able to keep you're rig up, you're engine running, the water on the outside and dewater what does find its way in, then you never need the conventional safety equipment, like a radio.

Keeping the mothership afloat and moving forward, is good seamanship.


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Old 19-09-2015, 14:13   #49
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Re: Most Important Safety Equipment

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Originally Posted by colemj View Post
I know the "correct"answer is to eschew electronics, but this is exactly the prototypes of a personal ais/dsc device. It marks the mob on the plotter and keeps track of the person and direction while the other person manages the boat.

Mark
I just saw that my ipad corrected "purpose of a personal…" to "prototypes of a personal…"

These aren't prototypes - they really exist commercially.

Mark
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Old 19-09-2015, 15:58   #50
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Re: Most Important Safety Equipment

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Originally Posted by colemj View Post
I know the "correct"answer is to eschew electronics, but this is exactly the purpose of a personal ais/dsc device. It marks the mob on the plotter and keeps track of the person and direction while the other person manages the boat.

Mark
Actually, I think the AIS beacon is the most promising development I've seen. My limited understanding is that it not only will mark & track the MOB on the plotter but also activate an AIS alarm, thereby potentially solving the problem of awakening the often sleeping crew member when the boat is manned with a two-person crew. I also like the idea of a PLB attached to a lifejacket, provided one is aware of its limitations as compared to an EPIRB.
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Old 19-09-2015, 16:20   #51
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Re: Most Important Safety Equipment

My Watchmate AIS's alarm for the AIS MOB beacon is completely different than any other alarm, it's that rising tone European Siren sound, loud as the devil, even with the engine running it would wake me.

The beacons I have have a test function, and I believe their range is a few miles, I bought it after reading about the Gentleman that woke up to find his wife missing, I believe she was never found. I have these on our vests along with a handheld with DSC, a light etc. But I think at night, no moon and bad weahter, it would be the beacon that would bring you to them.


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Old 22-09-2015, 16:26   #52
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Re: Most Important Safety Equipment

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Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
bolt cutters yes, but also a good, ready, non rusty, hack saw, because sometimes you can't brace the bolt cutters well.

also: stuff for serious wounds and injuries
With a couple of spare blades taped to the saw
Also a good tether with jack lines
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