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Old 04-07-2011, 15:49   #46
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Re: Location of Jacklines

Not sure this would technically qualify as a jackline, but what about using a line run up to a pulley assembly on the mast below the spreaders (basically, a vertical jackline)?

You could tie the line off to your harness, up and back. You could adjust the length of the line at will and this would basically let you travel all over the deck and to the bow on a single line.

Also, it seems to me intuitively that the near-vertical angle of line would mean that if you lost your footing, you'd swing "up" on the fulcrum and reduce the chance of falling overboard. And nothing to trip on on the deck.

Granted, my boat's simpler than most, but I'm staring at it now and I think it would work.
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Old 04-07-2011, 16:16   #47
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Re: Location of Jacklines

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Originally Posted by RSMacG View Post
Not sure this would technically qualify as a jackline, but what about using a line run up to a pulley assembly on the mast below the spreaders (basically, a vertical jackline)?

You could tie the line off to your harness, up and back. You could adjust the length of the line at will and this would basically let you travel all over the deck and to the bow on a single line.

Also, it seems to me intuitively that the near-vertical angle of line would mean that if you lost your footing, you'd swing "up" on the fulcrum and reduce the chance of falling overboard. And nothing to trip on on the deck.

Granted, my boat's simpler than most, but I'm staring at it now and I think it would work.
If thete were anyone who has tried this they have not lived to recommend it.

Picture yourself swinging on the end of a line tied to the mast in a 50 kt blow as you swung around the shrouds and stays.

The closer you stay to the deck and between the toerails the better your chance of survival.
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Old 04-07-2011, 18:43   #48
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Re: Location of Jacklines

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Originally Posted by RSMacG View Post
Not sure this would technically qualify as a jackline, but what about using a line run up to a pulley assembly on the mast below the spreaders (basically, a vertical jackline)?

You could tie the line off to your harness, up and back. You could adjust the length of the line at will and this would basically let you travel all over the deck and to the bow on a single line.

Also, it seems to me intuitively that the near-vertical angle of line would mean that if you lost your footing, you'd swing "up" on the fulcrum and reduce the chance of falling overboard. And nothing to trip on on the deck.

Granted, my boat's simpler than most, but I'm staring at it now and I think it would work.
I'm with John A. However, I was writing an article on jacklines and at the suggestion of a very well traveled catamaran sailor (RTW) I tried it. He was concerned about what might happen if the tramp gave way (possible only in very violent conditions, when waves are landing on the tramp). In fair weather, he found it convenient. I tried it, out of respect for diligence, and found it to be a complete failure.

a. The line will wrap around the spreaders if run high, like a loose halyard. Yes, I know you suggested a lower mounting.
b. The line is NEVER the correct length, since the required length on the cabin by the mast and by the bow are so different. Adjusting in a blow just isn't practical. You're holding on.
c. And what John said; I can picture myself getting whipped around like a lost halyard, wishing I was dead. On a monohull you would never get back on deck. On a catamaran you would be broken into small pieces.
d. Falling down isn't the risk; you should be low. Falling sideways is the problem.

But keep trying new ideas.
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Old 04-07-2011, 19:20   #49
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Re: Location of Jacklines

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But keep trying new ideas.
Okay, in the honest interests of brainstorming...

What about a single line with fixed loop around the base of the mast, and then tying off to my harness with a prussik knot? Pretty simple to change the length of the tether when not under direct strain. A big stopper knot on the end of the lead line?

Maybe too long at any point other than when actually at the mast?

I think I may just start attaching padeyes every few inches...
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Old 06-07-2011, 09:03   #50
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Re: Location of Jacklines

All boats are different, hence their rigging is different. An important factor is the hand-off between lines and this is where it's important how one's harness is rigged. The jacklines need to be tight and low to prevent fouling and tripping being attached so as to offer the best safety coverage in areas of your boat that could lead to a MOB. On raised deck boats an around the mast setup is a hazard at best, better to install mast pulpits for the best security.
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Old 06-07-2011, 09:38   #51
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Re: Location of Jacklines

The notion of clipping from one line to another while on the cabin top strikes me as foolish. It is often a high spot with good fall potencial and plenty of movment. It is probable that occationally you will be dragging something (sail, rope, person) with you and will not have a hand to hold on and a hand to clip.

Better to have a continuous line that can be clipped in the cockpit and crawl forward if need be. I think a great many falls happen because we haven't the sense to sit down or to scoot or to crawl when need be. In rough conditions I have been known to pull on knee pads; there are good reasons you often see them on the bows of racing boats.

Yes, I have read a few stories of sailor drown hanging on the side, and they are worth considering any mistakes that were made. But they don't compare in number to those who have been saved by a tether or those that were simply "lost."
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Old 06-07-2011, 10:05   #52
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Re: Location of Jacklines

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saw a boat in a marina next tome not too long ago with jacklines down each side-- seems the way to die in a sea-- would drag the person falling overboard in the water--- seems centerline jacklines would be a smarter way to go . i can place between masts easily as i donot use my main in big winds and seas...i use jib n jigger.
The reason for running the jacklines down each side deck is that you then have the option to go forward on the high side regardless of which tack you're currently on. A pretty slick system for those of us who actually use our mainsails.
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Old 06-07-2011, 11:02   #53
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Re: Location of Jacklines

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I hate thread drift but in this case I think a discussion on the fittings on the teather is appropriate. My original homemade teather had simple one handed snaps, I wore it constantly but was warned by others that those snaps were not adequate. My new store bought teather has the most God awful two handed snaps and is a PITA. What works for others on whatever jackline arrangement you have? Dave
sliding clasp Caribeener clips is what I have used. Easy secure one handed operation with a positive lock.
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Old 12-07-2011, 18:21   #54
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Re: Location of Jacklines

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sliding clasp Caribeener clips is what I have used. Easy secure one handed operation with a positive lock.
That's a pretty clasp but I think one stainless is a lot stronger then aluminum. The packaging should say what the strength of the clasp is. You can get a good clasp with a lot of strength at your local home Depot.
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Old 12-07-2011, 18:35   #55
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Re: Location of Jacklines

I'm not 100% sure that jacklines are a good idea on at least some boats. When offshore I rig one that allows me to clip on in the cockpit and then it runs forward to the mast and then to a bow cleat, so much of the way I could conceivably stay clipped in. But, in reality there are so many times when it is just better to go forward without the added impediment of the harness line getting caught on everything along the way, necessitating you to let go with one hand while you untangle or reclip. Without the jackline I go forward basically on all fours, never having both hands free at one time--in other words, before I let go with one hand the other has a secure grip on something strong, and I stay low to the deck and am able to move fast and securely this way. Then when I get to where I want to be I can clip with a short line to something really secure and strong like a cleat or the mast and I know that it is safe to use both hands for something with no danger that even if I fall I will go far. Too many, if not most, possible jackline setups would allow you to fall overboard and then be dragged along next to the boat where you will most likely drown.
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