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Old 11-08-2014, 19:53   #31
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Re: Lifejackets Again

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Originally Posted by Strait Shooter View Post
And what about the bell requirement? I've never had anyone ask me for it, but there it is on the bulkhead.
I believe the bell requirement has been deprecated.
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Old 11-08-2014, 21:32   #32
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Re: Lifejackets Again/UPDATE

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I don't think it's just the hydrostatic trigger unit that needs to be replaced at 5 years. There could also be a tiny leak in the CO2 cylinder. The green indicator doesn't tell if there is any gas in the cylinder. I know a lot of people think that's what it means but it doesn't. It just means that the little puncture pin hasn't been triggered. So if it were me I would at least weigh the expired CO2 cylinder and than again every year until you replace the whole assembly with a new one.

P.S. I keep one full set of "expired" Hammar inflator kits in a cool and dry locker in case the vest is used. At least we will have something that will probably work until I get to a place where I can buy a new kit. There is little point in keeping a spare inflator kit on-board as it will most likely expire before I use it anyway.
I just checked weighed the cylinder replaced on the 150N jacket and it still over the min weight so OK and without dismantling the 275N one as I don't yet have a new re-arm kit for it I assume that might also be OK as it is the same age exactly,having been being bought at the same time from the same source. We are keeping the cylinder just removed as a spare with it's hammar head in case that jacket does get used and we are not where we can obtain a re-arm set.
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Old 11-08-2014, 21:40   #33
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Re: Lifejackets Again

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Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
I've had 3 types of auto inflatables and of course a myriad of regular types. In the end, I found one particular regular foam one best for comfort. Not to mention the upkeep required for inflatable types. Nothing wrong with the inflatables for sure, as long as they are monitored and fit your comfort window.
I did think of simple foam ones but they do not have built in harnesses. I'm more inclined to like a harness that has flotation rather than the other way round so in the days of yore when we each had separate harnesses our lifejackets were never donned (we had simple buoyancy aids for use in the tenders back then, cheap and compact to leave in the dinghy when exploring ashore), The integral harness in a fully automatic lifejacket is a huge advantage in that at least it encourages wear.
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Old 12-08-2014, 19:34   #34
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Re: Lifejackets Again

Besides USCG approved PFDs, a non US boat could also get in trouble because of fire extinguishers and visual distress signals which need to be USCG approved. Are European fire extinguishers and distress signals USCG approved? The boats would also need to have the required number and type of extinguishers on board.

Later,
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Old 13-08-2014, 06:03   #35
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Re: Lifejackets Again

I heard somewhere that the USCG was planning to move away from their own certification to the CE certification.

The inspection sticker you mentioned is NOT from the US Coast Guard. It's from the USCG Auxiliary or Power Squadron. There are some inspectors who know and understand the regulations for cruising boats, and some who don't. Avoid the ones who usually only inspect runabouts.

The sticker is no guarantee against a boarding. If you're the only boat around, and there are boardings to be done, you will get boarded. However, it's far more likely they'll go after a boat without a sticker, or a small open boat, or one without the obvious safety equipment they'll see on your boat.
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Old 13-08-2014, 07:25   #36
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Re: Lifejackets Again

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Originally Posted by dannc View Post
Besides USCG approved PFDs, a non US boat could also get in trouble because of fire extinguishers and visual distress signals which need to be USCG approved. Are European fire extinguishers and distress signals USCG approved? The boats would also need to have the required number and type of extinguishers on board.

Later,
Dan

In the UK there are no legally required bits of kit on board, other countries like France do have rules, but most cruising boats are well equipped regardless because of education and commonsense, two things that excessive regulations defeat IMO. We certainly carried sensible types and sizes and quantities of fire extinguishers which had CE marks of course, but not USCG ones, why would they, but then a visiting US boat would not be challenged for having their own USCG approved ones. There is no regulatory requirement in the UK for distress signals either but most cruising boats will voluntarily carry full SOLAS kits such as are required by RORC for offshore racing events.

The French as I said do have rules of required on board kit, varying by how far the boat is away from a safe haven, but then this only says you must have it, not that you know how to use it( like a sextant and tables if >200mls offshore. or that you must deploy it (like a radar reflector) The French rules only apply to French registered vessels, a reason some there seek to register their boats elsewhere like next door in Belgium

IMO excessive regulation merely encourages the search for loopholes voluntary education promotes commonsense. IMO you cannot buy safety only encourage a commonsense approach to it.

Back to 'approved' fire extinguishers. Why is it that one otherwise identical to the approved CG marine, from the same manufacturer even, one but is half the price in Lowes or Home Depot for home use cannot be carried counted on the boat simply because it has not got the right CG label on it.
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Old 15-08-2014, 15:31   #37
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Lifejackets Again

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin3 View Post
In the UK there are no legally required bits of kit on board, other countries like France do have rules, but most cruising boats are well equipped regardless because of education and commonsense, two things that excessive regulations defeat IMO. We certainly carried sensible types and sizes and quantities of fire extinguishers which had CE marks of course, but not USCG ones, why would they, but then a visiting US boat would not be challenged for having their own USCG approved ones. There is no regulatory requirement in the UK for distress signals either but most cruising boats will voluntarily carry full SOLAS kits such as are required by RORC for offshore racing events.

The French as I said do have rules of required on board kit, varying by how far the boat is away from a safe haven, but then this only says you must have it, not that you know how to use it( like a sextant and tables if >200mls offshore. or that you must deploy it (like a radar reflector) The French rules only apply to French registered vessels, a reason some there seek to register their boats elsewhere like next door in Belgium

IMO excessive regulation merely encourages the search for loopholes voluntary education promotes commonsense. IMO you cannot buy safety only encourage a commonsense approach to it.

Back to 'approved' fire extinguishers. Why is it that one otherwise identical to the approved CG marine, from the same manufacturer even, one but is half the price in Lowes or Home Depot for home use cannot be carried counted on the boat simply because it has not got the right CG label on it.

The French safety rules actually apply to all leisure vessels operating within their territorial waters. They usually apply the rules of comity, but don't have to. I know several foreign vessels were remonstrated for not having flares


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Old 15-08-2014, 16:57   #38
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Re: Lifejackets Again

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Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
The French safety rules actually apply to all leisure vessels operating within their territorial waters. They usually apply the rules of comity, but don't have to. I know several foreign vessels were remonstrated for not having flares


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Like everywhere there are dumb officious officials who might think so but they cannot do so legally. I have been sailing in and out of French ports and waters for 50 years or more and been boarded many times (in harbour and at sea) on many different boats by French customs/Douaniers and (rarely) also by French Maritime police ( one of which took a great liking to my best Scotch whisky whilst he told us his life story one night in Port Haliguen Brittany. They are only really interested in the ships papers and always ask to see the original Registration documents, and usually passport of the Captain but rarely of crew members ( I'm a Brit and my normal crew was my American wife). Their interest seems mainly in catching French boat owners dodging French Rules and VAT by registering outside of France and claiming to be mere visitors. Occasionally we would hear of non-French vessels being harassed by officials and even talk of fines but it is illegal and probably results from said officials encountering a vessel owner with a bad 'attitude'. A smile and welcome aboard go a very long way towards l'entente cordaiale.
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