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Old 24-12-2009, 06:21   #16
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Originally Posted by Boracay View Post
What I'm looking for in a harness is something that will keep me from getting into trouble in the first place.
It's your tether and jacklines that will keep you out of trouble, the harness is just the attachment point. If you set up your tethers and jacklines correctly you won't be going over the side.
We have Mustang inflatables with built-in harnesses. The rule is they get put on before we leave the dock.
When we sail in the bay we don't use the tethers unless the weather is bad but they are readily available in the cockpit if a sudden squall comes up.
Outside the bay the tethers are hooked up when you come on deck.

The harnesses in your diagram seem the type used by people doing aerial work like window washing not sure how useful any of them would be on a boat.
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Old 24-12-2009, 07:14   #17
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Very true - staying onboard is the point.

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Originally Posted by bloodhunter View Post
It's your tether and jacklines that will keep you out of trouble, the harness is just the attachment point. If you set up your tethers and jacklines correctly you won't be going over the side.
We have Mustang inflatables with built-in harnesses. The rule is they get put on before we leave the dock.
When we sail in the bay we don't use the tethers unless the weather is bad but they are readily available in the cockpit if a sudden squall comes up.
Outside the bay the tethers are hooked up when you come on deck.

The harnesses in your diagram seem the type used by people doing aerial work like window washing not sure how useful any of them would be on a boat.
I posted a long bit about harnesses, tether, and jacklines on my blog (http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/search?q=jacklines+harnesses+unemployed). I've been a very active mountaineer and sailor for 25 years, and I think it is a safe bet that I have spent more air time than anyone here, unless there is a rigger or window washer on line.

I hope you find some tip useful.
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Old 24-12-2009, 08:32   #18
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Two things.
1) My vest/harness has the optional crotch strap. Without it the vest may slip off.
2) Always have a quick release shackle on the chest end of the teather so you can release from the boat if it should become neccesary.
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Old 24-12-2009, 13:47   #19
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Thinwater's Excellent Blog...

Thinwater's blog is excellent. I've been looking for information on how to set up jacklines and harnesses and his is the best I've seen.
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Old 24-12-2009, 14:40   #20
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Another vote for thinwater's jackline blog post (very detailed) and his blog in general. It has been very helpful for us.

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Old 27-12-2009, 19:51   #21
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I like the industrial fall harness I used when working in construction. Full body support, with a high level ring on it. This and a lanyard will save you if you fall off a scaffold or something, so using it on a boat makes sense to me. I bought one from an industrial supplier (Brafasco) in Toronto for about $150 plus tax.

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Old 27-12-2009, 21:46   #22
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I wonder what a fall on that crotch strap will feel like....

Quote:
Originally Posted by speciald@ocens. View Post
Two things.
1) My vest/harness has the optional crotch strap. Without it the vest may slip off.
2) Always have a quick release shackle on the chest end of the tether so you can release from the boat if it should become necessary.
Try just hanging from a halyard with your mass on your private parts for one minute, and then write back.

All kidding aside, that could easily be a medical emergency, if only dropped with body weight. That sort of araingment is not permitted in climbing or industrial harnesses. You either need leg loops, or just fit it properly to the chest (high and tight).
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Old 28-12-2009, 08:16   #23
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Thinwater,
Thanks for the link to your blog. Very informative.
I now use Like those tethers much more than the ones I make out of old halyards, Will checkout REI
I use Samson Ropes Amsteel for my jacklines, breaking strength of 9000+
My main problem would be getting back on the boat so I try to keep my tethers as short as possible. Enchantress is low to the water for a boat her size but it's still a long way up. We have a lifesling and practice using it but I wonder how well it would work if I were injured.
When my kids were young we used Lirakis harnesses which fit right under the armpits and would not slide up or down attached to tethers. Having them were life jackets especially during the summer onm the Chesapeake would have put paid to their desire to go sailing.
Don't know if Lirakis is still around but they made really strong simpel and durable harnesses. would recommend the to anyone.
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Old 28-12-2009, 10:32   #24
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I think re-boarding and boarding ladders are always part of the same thread.

I have always had transom ladders, so they are an integral part of my plan.

Your boat is beautiful, but lacks transom ladder potential. On a prior boat I had a houseboat-style ladder that could be moved to either side. I wonder if some simple side ladder would make sense for you. You must have some provision for getting out of the water when using the tender or swimming?
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Old 28-12-2009, 17:14   #25
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There are harnesses available that offer relative comfort while wearing and will secure the COB once needed. Best to try them on in the store and consider wearing with foul weather gear and without - so adjustability is important.
The discussion about integral harness and life jackets becomes personal preference.
Tethers should be rigged so they can be released from the harness under load in case an emergency requires quick disconnect. Snap shackles are better in this application than snap hooks.
USE ISAF or US SAILING PRESCRIPTIONS WHEN RESEARCHING LIFE SAVING EQUIPMENT. They are doing the work to create standards that are universal and can be tested.
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Old 10-01-2010, 18:24   #26
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Try just hanging from a halyard with your mass on your private parts for one minute, and then write back.
Good trade persons know how to care for their delicate tools; careless ones may experience some losses. I know of one who did lose the lot when rappelling. It did not affect his writing but did improve his singing.
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Old 10-01-2010, 18:35   #27
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Ours clip at waist.

We are old type built (waist narrowest). Tried and tested will not slip.

Around us mostly A type figures - then one needs a crotch strap I guess.

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Old 13-01-2010, 18:06   #28
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Snap shackles are better in this application than snap hooks.
I do not regard snap anything as secure: in accordance with Murphy’s Law they will open at the least desirable time.
Industrial safety gear in general is not “marine” and therefore will rust.
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Old 21-01-2010, 17:05   #29
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A though on quick realease shackles

Quote:
Originally Posted by speciald@ocens. View Post
Two things.
1) My vest/harness has the optional crotch strap. Without it the vest may slip off.
2) Always have a quick release shackle on the chest end of the teather so you can release from the boat if it should become neccesary.
Would you take one rock climbing, hanging over a thousand feet of clean air, or would the thought of a quick-release bother you? Would you use one up the mast (I really hope not)?

I think we have all had spin shackles open when they shouldn't have. I've seen it happen in AC races.

No rock climber in his right mind owns a quick release shackle. None are UIAA approved. I'm not suggesting that in a boat where a roll-over is a possibility that there is not a purpose. I am saying that I prefer, for my own reasons, a wire gate carabiner. I don't expect anyone to follow that lead.
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