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Old 04-09-2011, 11:21   #31
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

amen, cpt geo--i didnt mention that, as anyone trying to buy it will find they are object of scrutiny....
phenergan doesnt cause hallucinations as does scopolomine, and i dont know the other med you mentioned..lol...i dont get seasick, ever.
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Old 04-09-2011, 11:35   #32
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

The primary adverse reaction to Phenergan is sedation, which is undesirable on a boat in rough water.... Oldansetron (Zolfran) is an anti-emetic without sedative effects

Oldansetron/Zolfran

I would think PO meds would be easily sourced with a ‘script from a MD that cruises for just about anyone.... Mine writes me ‘scripts for injectables being a paramedic
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Old 04-09-2011, 15:08   #33
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

The wonderful thing about Reed's Ginger Beer is not just the ginger, but the burp. Being prone to seasickness, I've become a burping advocate. The feeling of relief is delightful!
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Old 04-09-2011, 15:35   #34
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

Here's an interesting paper that compares the efficacy of 7 treatments for seasickness. + very large sample size, - no placebo.

Results:Follow up was possible in 1489 volunteers (85.5%). In each active treatment group, 4.1-10.2% experienced vomiting and 16.4-23.5% experienced malaise (not significant). Equally, there was no significant difference in the incidence and characteristics of adverse events reported in the various medication groups. Scopolamine Transdermal Therapeutic System (lTS) users exhibited slightly more visual problems and the agent tended to be less effective.

And on ginger:

Ginger had previously controversial results. In this study, it was as potent an agent as the others.


http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1....tb00596.x/pdf
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Old 04-09-2011, 15:55   #35
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

Thank you so much! I would never take the drugs - too many side effects - and it's good to know that my dear friend ginger does as well. I'll keep trying. I've got a few homeopathic remedies that I'll try on the next trip, too. Really appreciate your passing this along to give me.
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Old 04-09-2011, 16:01   #36
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

i understand from someone who uses em that the wrist bands work well.
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Old 04-09-2011, 16:07   #37
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

I tried it once, but maybe I didn't have it in the right place on my wrist. My step-niece is an acupuncturist and since then has told me that if you put your ring finger at the bottom of the place where your hand bends, the pressure should go where the pointer finger is. I'll give it another try. I'd better try one thing at a time to figure out which one is working
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Old 04-09-2011, 16:08   #38
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

the lil button needs to be on a pressure point...
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Old 04-09-2011, 16:10   #39
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

Thanks!
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Old 10-09-2011, 22:25   #40
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

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Originally Posted by capngeo View Post
Onion Juice in the nostril? Ginger suppository... OOps Wrong thread

That would be a garlic suppository capngeo, not ginger....and then only if you're needing to shrink hemorrhoids.....we're dealing with seasickness on this thread.

Are you telling me I need to take that "other" thread off ignore and respond to the bigots?

I'd say "show me your medical kit and I'll show you mine", but then you'd probably think I'm trying to pick you up.
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Old 10-09-2011, 23:09   #41
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

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Phenergan and Ondansetron are pretty good too, and won’t get you relieved of your boat if caught with it!
Have you actually used Ondansetron for seasickness? Article on Wikepedia advises it does not help for motion sickness.

Zee, you may know it as Zofran.
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Old 10-09-2011, 23:23   #42
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

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And on ginger:

[Ginger had previously controversial results. In this study, it was as potent an agent as the others.

Comparison of Seven Commonly Used Agents for Prophylaxis of Seasickness - Schmid - 2006 - Journal of Travel Medicine - Wiley Online Library
What an interesting study, especially with that large sample size. Intriguing that ginger root had similar efficacy as compared the various pharmaceutical solutions.

@mermaidmuse - I know you think I jump all over you when I talk about peer reviewed studies on the efficacy of folk remedies, and that in most cases they just are never able to hold up to proof.

Here is an obvious case of exactly the opposite. Good study design, extremely large sample size, peer reviewed, and the folk remedy stands up very well to the pharma ones.

This is the type of research I would like to see in other cases, rather then depending on testimonials or traditional knowledge.

So, chalk one up for the non-pharma solution
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Old 11-09-2011, 03:24   #43
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

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@mermaidmuse - I know you think I jump all over you when I talk about peer reviewed studies on the efficacy of folk remedies, and that in most cases they just are never able to hold up to proof.
We mermaids are fast swimmers.....there is no way you could jump all over me.....you'd be lost in the curl.

I merely pointed out that "peer reviewed" studies can have their own limitations and biases and these need to be taken into consideration.

If a researcher is willing to take the time to understand how a particular medicine works, a reasonable study can be designed. Unfortunately the original context or method of use of a medicine within traditional medicine is often ignored. This leads to poorly designed studies that are then touted a "proof" that the traditional medicine doesn't work.

Generally speaking, reductionist medical systems treat a symptom(s) specifically while holistic medical systems treat the unique individual person and seek to remove the cause of imbalance in the body that is causing the symptom to manifest. There are more variables involved when you treat the entire person rather than just a symptom in a vacuum.

To do a worthwhile study of the medicine of these systems (such as Ayurveda, Unani or Qi Gong Chinese Medicine), the constitutions of the individuals participating would need to be assessed and identified and the traditional method of use (or method of action) of a particular medicine would also need to be considered.

A case in point is a 2003 study on guggul published in JAMA which then flowed into the popular media with the headlines that guggul is not effective for hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol levels). Subsequent studies that were better designed have since shown guggul to be very effective in improving cholesterol levels.

Any Ayurvedic physician can tell you that if you give a large enough standard dose of guggul to a group of individuals, the Vata predominant body types will likely do well in the short term and then dry out, the Pitta predominant body types will show signs of heat aggravation, usually seen as loose bowel movements and/or skin rashes and the Kapha predominant body types will see a short term increase in cholesterol and would need to take guggul for a longer duration before the serum cholesterol levels dropped. The reason for the temporary increase is that guggul dissolves the cholesterol plaque in the vessels and puts it back into circulation until the liver can filter it out. This action of guggul to dissolve the plaque could easily be proven with appropriate imaging, such as the use of an ultrasound of the carotid artery.

Szapary's results were entirely predictable but his method and conclusions flawed because he didn't take the time to understand how this medicine is used in its original context. Traditionally, guggul is not given alone. It has a heating energy (virya) and a pungent post digestive effect (vipaka) which gives it light, penetrating and drying qualities. To treat a Pitta (fire/water) predominant individual, guggul is blended with cooling herbs to avoid overheating the person, such as with the rashes seen in the above study. To treat a Vata (air/ether) predominant individual, the drying quality of guggul needs to be balanced with something moistening (eg demulcent), to treat a Kapha (earth/water) predominant individual, guggul would be balanced with something alterative to help the liver process the dissolved plaque.

The concept of a "standard" dose for all patients is flawed because humans do not come in standard packages. If you give me ten individuals diagnosed with the same allopathic disease , I will show you that there are actually ten different pathologies involved and ten different sets of treatments needed (from an Ayurvedic point of view). There may be some overlap on some of the treatments, but ultimately each individual arrived at their list of similar symptoms in their own unique way and each will need to be rebalanced in their own way.

One other area of communication challenge that you and I are having is that I speak of traditional medicine systems that are complete medical systems, that are taught in universities, that include hospitals, including trauma care and surgery, and you refer to these systems as "folk remedies".

Getting back to ginger - dry ginger is more heating that fresh ginger. A Pitta predominant person would do better with fresh ginger with a little sugar or candied ginger, or ginger beer or cookies rather than the powdered ginger. Sweet taste is cooling. Too much pungency will make Pitta nauseated to begin with. If powdered ginger is all that is available, a lower dose should be taken with a small amount of sweet.

You can take this quiz to help evaluate your constitution. It won't be as accurate as working with a trained practitioner but it can give an idea.

Another technique that may help, depending on the individual is to adjust the intracranial pressure by putting the index finger in the ear, and then gently pulling up, forward and down. You may need to do this more than once.
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Old 11-09-2011, 04:23   #44
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

We tried out raw ginger. But since we do not get seasick anyways it is hard to say whether it worked or not.

In any case, it does not hurt.

You can make a strong drink out of boiled water, sliced ginger, lime and some sugar/honey/sweetener.

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Old 12-09-2011, 19:40   #45
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Re: Ginger for Seasickness

I would never waste ginger beer on a seasick person. Ginger beer is far too valuable when mixed with Goslings.

I carry ginger candies, ginger tea etc. but IMHO the best cure for seasickness is sailing. I sometimes feel queasy the first day or two, but once I get my sea legs I'm fine.
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