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Old 25-02-2008, 23:06   #16
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Originally Posted by David M View Post
Other than an abbreviation for a Motherboard, what is a MOBO?
Motorboat, I would guess...
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Old 26-02-2008, 07:28   #17
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We are in the process of gathering materials to build our next boat and the alcohol stove is out and we will be going with propane. Yes, it is similar, but with propane we can build in some safety switches and in fact, we have already purchased them.

I readily acknowledge that I should have learned more about the alcohol stove long before the fire. I had used it many times in the past without incident and cooked many meals similar to the one I was working on at the time of the fire. That is little comfort after the fact and even knowing more now I do not feel comfortable using it.

Lori

Way to go! As a previous poster mentioned, the alcohol stoves do work great but. True, all boat stoves have their dangers but I believe alcohol has more of them. CNG is another option but I'm not sure as to the availability of CNG abroad compared to propane. I have no experience in this area.
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Old 26-02-2008, 09:27   #18
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We had a fire the first or second season with our current boat. The fire was confined to the galley aroud our alcohol stove. We keep 3 or 4 fire extinguishers on board one of which is in the galley so it was quickly put out. To this day I am nervous using that stove.

Lori
I also experienced a fire with my alcohol stove on my last boat. Cause was my own ignorance/idiocy on how to use it. I "filled" it with the cap closed and unsurprisingly the whole thing caught fire when I put a match to it. I first covered the flames with a fire retardant cloth which didn't put out the flames. I thought it had but they had been working their magic unseen. When I lifted of the cloth I had what felt like an inferno. A quick squirt from my Halon fire extinguisher immediately hosed the fire. I held my breath and told my crew mate to stick his head out the hatch then found fresh air myself.
Wisdom: Be very, very careful with alcohol stoves. Replace if necessary.
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Old 26-02-2008, 11:13   #19
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Originally Posted by scotte View Post
Motorboat, I would guess...
Ooops , yes, MOBO = Motorboat.

Not quite boat related, but a good few years back one firm I worked at gave everyone fire training - not only was the use of a fire extinguisher demonstrated - but everyone had to give it a go on a burning bucket of papers.

The blokes of course all wanted a go - but most of the women were not so keen........but everyone had to.

Outcome for the blokes was that the experiance was useful, as use was not quite as expected.

For the women the reaction was more along the lines "oh, is that it?" (where have I heard that before ) and were left puzzled as to why they were so reluctant to give it a go at the outset.

Maybe worth having a practice with the Admiral?
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Old 26-02-2008, 12:13   #20
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Hmmmm? Fires onboard eh? Well other than Knottygirlz tyring to burn down our boat I've had some experience. Two stints in Marine Emergency Duties training, simulators, lifesaving, survival etc. and a stint in the Ontario Fire College in Gravenhurst I'm pretty much up to date with the training side of it. Besides I come from a family of volunteer firefighters.

The first fire I had to fight onboard a ship was in a garbage pile on the deck of the Griffon in 1979 (not very glamorous). Spontaneous combustion had lit up a pile of garbage bags that we stacked under one of the open deck companionways. Didn't really amount to much, some charred paint and a big mess to clean up but it changed the way we handled garbage from then on. Blamed it on the galley rats tossin' their bacon grease soaked rags in the garbage. What a freakin' mess to clean up though.

Second fire was on a yacht that was tied up along side us in Midland ON. A galley fire again. Mostly just smoke damage.

Third was a fire in the engine room aboard the Samuel Risley back around 88 or 89. A fuel line had split and shot across the E/R to the exhaust manifold of the engine beside it causing a nasty fire. We were breaking ice and escorting a freighter into Thunder Bay at the time. The old captain didn't want the captain of the freighter to know we were in trouble and ordered us all back inside, I was Logistics Officer and in charge of First Aid team and refused to send them back into a smoke filled ship. He flipped out and we had words. He was wrong and he knew it. The Chief Engineer and engineering officer on watch had the fire out before the fire crews could get into the E/R.

We fought a fire onboard a lake freighter in Sarnia, ON back in the early 80's but I can't remember the name of the ship. No one went onboard due to the heat and flames and we used our hand hoses from the upper decks to try to help the shore side firefighters. We got so close with the Griffon that her aluminum superstructure started to buckle in some places. I was a galley rat back then and didn't do much firefighting just keeping the fella's in dry gloves and hot coffee.

We used to train with the water bombers in Thunder Bay and that was cool. The Risley was fitted with fire monitors to fight fires at the grain elevators. They were impressive pumps fitted directly to the shafts.

Of all the emergency training I've taken I think the damage control course was the worst. Imagine being sealed in a large tank with ice cold water rushing in up to your neck through a split pipe that you had to mend in total darkness. Yup that was fun! NOT!
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Old 29-02-2008, 15:19   #21
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Flaming Rhodes Reliant

In the mid-70's we sailed a 41' Rhodes Reliant Yawl of the design later sold as the Choy Lee Offshore 41. The ship was fitted with a pressurized alcohol stove, the pressure being provided by a bicycle type pump attached to the tank in a locker near the stove.

During one trip, for whatever reason, the jets on one of the burners malfunctioned and allowed a stream of raw alcohol to spray out where it was immediately ignited by the flame in the adjoining burner. The crew/cook leaped back and tossed a pot of hot water and pasta that had just been taken off the stove on the fire which only served to splash buring alcohol all over hell and gone. Fortunately, another crew grabbed a blanket off the settee and smothered the fire. (Both pasta and blanket were a write off!)

All the foregoing transpired while I was at the helm and unawares of developments, which I only learned of after the erstwhile cook/crew sliped open the hatch and popped her head out, and wreathed in wisps of steam, brightly announced "Dinner will be delayed". It was--and the stove was soon replaced with propane!

Since then we have always kept a fire-blanket within arms reach of the galley!

Cheers,

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Old 29-02-2008, 15:29   #22
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In the mid-70's we sailed a 41' Rhodes Reliant Yawl of the design later sold as the Choy Lee Offshore 41. The ship was fitted with a pressurized alcohol stove, the pressure being provided by a bicycle type pump attached to the tank in a locker near the stove.

During one trip, for whatever reason, the jets on one of the burners malfunctioned and allowed a stream of raw alcohol to spray out where it was immediately ignited by the flame in the adjoining burner. The crew/cook leaped back and tossed a pot of hot water and pasta that had just been taken off the stove on the fire which only served to splash buring alcohol all over hell and gone. Fortunately, another crew grabbed a blanket off the settee and smothered the fire. (Both pasta and blanket were a write off!)

All the foregoing transpired while I was at the helm and unawares of developments, which I only learned of after the erstwhile cook/crew sliped open the hatch and popped her head out, and wreathed in wisps of steam, brightly announced "Dinner will be delayed". It was--and the stove was soon replaced with propane!

Since then we have always kept a fire-blanket within arms reach of the galley!

Cheers,

s/v HyLyte
Well, at least you're alive. If that was a propane burner malfunction of the same caliber... I'd hate to see the results.
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Old 29-02-2008, 15:43   #23
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Originally Posted by knottybuoyz View Post
Of all the emergency training I've taken I think the damage control course was the worst. Imagine being sealed in a large tank with ice cold water rushing in up to your neck through a split pipe that you had to mend in total darkness. Yup that was fun! NOT!
That kinda puts my "Burning paper in a bucket training" into the shade a bit
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Old 29-02-2008, 15:53   #24
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Simple things like keeping a Fire Blanket module near the galley to contain and smother any cooking fire is a worthwhile investment and less of a mess than using an extinguisher.
Aboard an English gals', single-handed circumnavigator I noticed a fire blanket, but I've never seen any available at any local chandlery.
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Old 29-02-2008, 17:48   #25
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We had a smallish fire with our kerosine stove after I had been changing the jets in the burners. A small spill just within the stove itself, but still had flames licking up the galley wall (protected by a stainless sheet). I hoped it would burn out quickly, but as it kept getting bigger I used a dry chemical extinguisher to put it out. Very messy.

Lessons learned - keep the fire blanket near the stove, but not TOO near it - I couldn't easily get to it when the fire was going in it's original position.

And after working with flammable liquids, wipe around the area even if you don't think you spilled any.
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Old 29-02-2008, 18:52   #26
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We had a fire and I will tell you "it is one of the worst things on earth". Luckily we had 6000 men and all the fire equipment in the world to fight it. We only lost two people and damaged or destroyed seven aircraft. Point of the story? Practice and drills...
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Old 29-02-2008, 20:41   #27
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CNG is another option but I'm not sure as to the availability of CNG abroad compared to propane. I have no experience in this area.
I have always understood CNG to be lighter than air while propane and LPG is heavier. This would make CNG very desirable from a safety aspect.
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Old 29-02-2008, 20:53   #28
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Engine compartments.

IMO if you don't have an auto fire extinguishing system in your engine compartment, I suggest a small hole (~1 inch diameter) somewhere suitable on compartment covering (with a simple cover) into which you can discharge a fire extinguisher without having to open the compartment thus not exposing fire to air and not exposing yourself to fire.
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Old 29-02-2008, 22:19   #29
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Squeaks! ... I have something like this one on the boat and at home.

New Fire

If you google "Fire Blanket" I am sure you can find something nearby
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Old 29-02-2008, 23:50   #30
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I have always understood CNG to be lighter than air while propane and LPG is heavier. This would make CNG very desirable from a safety aspect.
I agree!!!!
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