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Old 24-06-2008, 08:36   #1
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Dockline splice - inside or outside of the chock?

OK, it's hurricane season, and time to change docklines. On our boat, docklines go thru a chock before arriving at a cleat - as I understand it, not the best solution, but it's what we have.

Am I better off making the splice larger than normal, and then having the 2 lines of the splice going thru the chock, to divide the chafe?

Speaking of chafe, recent studies have shown that lines fail from heat - are we better off using canvas or fire hose for chafe protection?
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Old 25-06-2008, 16:53   #2
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OK, 75 views, and NO OPINIONS? Come on, folks!
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Old 25-06-2008, 17:09   #3
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Sure good idea.
Cleats should be as near to fairleads as possible. This reduces the distance over which the line can stretch/contract, resulting in the sawing actions that creates heating.
The line should be better able to absorb any heating, in the event that a slightly lengthened splice (tapered long splice0) can add extra mass at the point of friction (fairlead).
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Old 25-06-2008, 17:59   #4
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Depending on how thick your dock lines are, you could possibly run each of them through a length hose, then run both of those through a fire hose. I may need to see a picture. And is your boat in San Antonio or Corpus? I gather from your profile it is in Corpus.
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Old 25-06-2008, 21:56   #5
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Personnally I like to use the clear water hose.....it is inexpensive and you can get it at "Lowes" Marine or "Marine" Depot
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Old 25-06-2008, 22:31   #6
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I'd make up the splices so single lines run through the chocks. You are going to have to have some kind of chafing gear on the lines in rough conditions. Having the line doubled along with chafing gear probably won't fit easily through the chocks.

Ditto on PVC pipe for chafing gear but anything heavy enough to protect the line as it turns through the chock will do. Most boats have some kind of chock between the dock and the cleat. If you don't and the boat is higher than the dock, the line is going to chafe along the gunnel messing it and the rope up.

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Old 26-06-2008, 06:04   #7
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OK, 75 views, and NO OPINIONS? Come on, folks!
Ok, here's an opinion. Why are you splicing the line, why not just cleat it off? What does putting an eye on the cleat get you, besides not being able to easily get the line back off when it's under strain?
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Old 26-06-2008, 06:44   #8
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I've got to agree with Fishspearit... how do you slip the lines when the extra high tide, or tidal surge arrives? You have limited yourself to only end of the line that you can adjust.
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Old 26-06-2008, 08:31   #9
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two layers

you want two layers of chaff protection. The inside layer is a slick loosely wound fabric and the outer layer is leather, again loosely wound. You want the layers to move independently of each other and the line.
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Old 26-06-2008, 08:41   #10
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I suspect that a splice forward of the fairlead would place one side under pressure from the other, increasing the load and concentrating the heat from friction. If you could wrap the cleat so that the line would remain tied if either side let go, you might be better off, but I can't imagine how you could do that. So you are better off tied than spliced.
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Old 26-06-2008, 10:38   #11
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I've got to agree with Fishspearit... how do you slip the lines when the extra high tide, or tidal surge arrives? You have limited yourself to only end of the line that you can adjust.
I agree in principal with you two, but I think he is looking for a way to secure his boat for the upcoming hurricane season. I asked the question earlier to clarify, but I think his boat is in Corpus and he lives in San Antonio over 100 miles away. I don't think he will be close ebough to adjust the lines as a storm comes in (nor should he be). If that is the case, he is looking for a method to protect his lines and boat while he is away.

I agree above with the water hose directly over the lines and then send them through a fire hose. I don't know how much room he has though as that would create one very thick line in essence.
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Old 26-06-2008, 16:14   #12
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OK, THANKS for all of the responses. See if this helps:

The boat is in Corpus Christi City Marina - 145 miles from home 2 hours, door to door, no evacuation traffic ;-)

It is on a FLOATING pier, with 14' pilings. Allegedly, enough for a storm surge from a 3+ hurricane. The marina wants boats "strapped" to the floating finger piers - that's how the marina was designed. Other lines can be run to support this, but they want the primary support for the boat to be the engineered structure.

PVC hose is a definate NO-NO. Studies have shown that this is MUCH worse than even bare line. It holds in the heat from the constant friction from movement, and it doesn't allow cooling rain/spray. Lines fail very quickly covered in PVC hose. See Practical Sailor for the studies.

There are chocks, with smooth leads, from the cleats. I can't go directly from the cleats to the dock cleats without hitting the rail or going thru the chocks. I understand that studies have shown direct cleat to cleat setups are the best.

I have 2" ID firehose, but not sure whether to use it, or use canvas instead, because of the above concerns about hose. I have plenty of canvas.

Splices on the lines sure make it easier to drop/reattach lines when going sailing.
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Old 26-06-2008, 20:56   #13
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Bump... Sorry, but, for some reason, the thread doesn't show on the "new" list??
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Old 26-06-2008, 21:52   #14
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Quote:
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.

Am I better off making the splice larger than normal, and then having the 2 lines of the splice going thru the chock, to divide the chafe?

Speaking of chafe, recent studies have shown that lines fail from heat - are we better off using canvas or fire hose for chafe protection?
I have absolutely no expertise in long term berthing of boats - especially one your size.

However, I have not seen any large boats docked that extend the eye splice through the chock or fairlead. It seems that the spliced lines wouldn't take up the load evenly anyway and one would ride on the other. Also, it seems the line would be "working" harder where it passes the chock. Finally a "double" thickness of spliced rope would be less flexible when turning around the chock and therefore create more stress, friction and heat.

I don't think I would want the splice to have to handle a change of direction. Especially one that may be working all the time.

If sized right, a single line through the chock is the way I would go as long as the splice length is sufficient for the integrity of the eye.

As for covering I would select something that would allow water to penetrate, i.e. not waterproof. Anything else (firehose?) might also retain heat. I'd go with the canvas.

Obviously once you have dropped the eye over the cleat you can close the throat of the eye so it can't slip the cleat.
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