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Old 20-02-2016, 15:11   #1
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Dewatering Pump

In case anyone is interested, here's what I've settled on for a dewatering pump:

WilTec


It will shift over 40 cubic meters of water per hour with a head of up to 2.5 meters or so, which is more than 10,000 gallons per hour.

That will keep up with any broken sea cock on my boat -- a 2" through hull 18" below the surface will flow about 6,000 gallons per hour.

The key things here are that the pump is:

1. mobile; and
2. it will eat up trash and debris.

Anyone who has ever used a bilge pump in anger knows that they quickly clog up, because flooding washes all kinds of carp out of even the cleanest bilge. That has sunk many boats, I have no doubt.

Its mobility means that it can be used to save someone else's boat, besides my own, or can be moved to another location if needed. Also means that it can be pulled up out of the bilge to unclog it if necessary, although being capable of dealing with 2" particles, it shouldn't clog at all hopefully. Although the beast weighs 33kg, so not easy in a seaway and/or single handed.

It will live in my main bilge with the roll-up 3" firehose type discharge hose attached.

It draws 2.2 kW and will be powered by my inverter or by my generator. In order to be sure that I can use it even if the water is knee-deep, I will install a changeover box on my generator which will allow me to disconnect the ship's power system and plug directly into the generator, which lives well above the waterline and should be dry right to the end in a flooding situation.


I have five other bilge pumps including a large manual one, two Whale "supersubs" for maintenance of main bilge and engine bilge, and a pair of Rule 4000 gallon per hour jumbo pumps.

The Rule pumps might be able to keep up with a broken through hull but only if they don't clog. The clogging issue, and the desire to have a means to fight flooding with overwhelming force, is what has driven me to the trash pump.


The trash pump can also be used as an excellent fire pump. I will buy a nozzle for the hose for this purpose.
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Old 20-02-2016, 15:21   #2
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Re: Dewatering Pump

The link is not working for me. Can you post the make / model of the pump?
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Old 20-02-2016, 15:34   #3
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Re: Dewatering Pump

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveInMD View Post
The link is not working for me. Can you post the make / model of the pump?
Sorry, here it is:

WilTec - Trash Water Pump V2200F with float switch 42000l/h with 2200W Trash Water Pump V2200F with float switch 42000l/h with only 2200W 50988
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Old 20-02-2016, 16:54   #4
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Re: Dewatering Pump

I'm only considering an engine driven pump, probably 3", probably full trash diesel.
Bit iffy about petrol but they are cheaper and lighter - and I carry petrol for the outboard anyway. Not like it's going to use much fuel.

Seems to me that a self-contained unit running on deck is a big advantage.
Generators & batteries being low down will flood early - a pump on deck will run until its out of fuel or the boat goes under.

With an electric pump you can only assist another boat if their generator's still running or they're near enough that your cable will reach.
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Old 20-02-2016, 17:06   #5
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Re: Dewatering Pump

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Originally Posted by unclemack View Post
I'm only considering an engine driven pump, probably 3", probably full trash diesel.
Bit iffy about petrol but they are cheaper and lighter - and I carry petrol for the outboard anyway. Not like it's going to use much fuel.

Seems to me that a self-contained unit running on deck is a big advantage.
Generators & batteries being low down will flood early - a pump on deck will run until its out of fuel or the boat goes under.

With an electric pump you can only assist another boat if their generator's still running or they're near enough that your cable will reach.
Engine-driven pump has plus of being autonomous and can be used on deck. Minus - weight, bulk, need to regularly run, and service. Gasoline not acceptable because you can't store the device in the main hull volume - where would you keep it? Also, carb subject to gumming up.

On my particular boat, the generator is far above the waterline, so should work until the boat is slipping below the waves, so in my case this is the best power source.

Sent from my D6633 using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
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Old 20-02-2016, 17:39   #6
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Re: Dewatering Pump

Interesting. Anyone know if there is a version for the opposite side of the pond, at 120V/60Hz?
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Old 20-02-2016, 17:49   #7
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Re: Dewatering Pump

Converts to 185 US GPM-that oughta do it!! Be careful it doesn't suck a hole in the bottom of her

Cheers/LEN
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Old 20-02-2016, 17:53   #8
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Re: Dewatering Pump

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Originally Posted by Moody46CC View Post
Interesting. Anyone know if there is a version for the opposite side of the pond, at 120V/60Hz?
Check out "sump pumps/sewage pumps" at local hardware & farm supply places. GPM will probably only be half at 120vac but they are available in 240vac if you have a generator.

Cheers/ Len
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Old 20-02-2016, 18:18   #9
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Re: Dewatering Pump

Deblen,

Thanks but I'm not sure I follow. I do have a generator, but it puts out 110-115V at 60Hz, not 230.
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Old 20-02-2016, 20:20   #10
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Re: Dewatering Pump

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moody46CC View Post
Deblen,

Thanks but I'm not sure I follow. I do have a generator, but it puts out 110-115V at 60Hz, not 230.
Some gensets put out both 120 & 240.

You will have to use a 120vac pump but it will still pump a considerable volume of water.
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Old 20-02-2016, 20:31   #11
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Re: Dewatering Pump

How much did your pump cost?
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Old 20-02-2016, 20:34   #12
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Re: Dewatering Pump

I planned to add the KPM Predator bilge pump I'm May.
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Old 20-02-2016, 21:34   #13
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Re: Dewatering Pump

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I planned to add the KPM Predator bilge pump I'm May.
That's an excellent pump. I believe you turned me on to that? I will eventually replace one of my Rule 4000 pumps with one of those.
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Old 20-02-2016, 22:01   #14
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Re: Dewatering Pump

The pump has impressive specs. The link you gave looks like a German distributor, but the pump is Chinese and seems too inexpensive for the given specs.
The startup current may be too much for an inverter.
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Old 20-02-2016, 22:10   #15
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Re: Dewatering Pump

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
In case anyone is interested, here's what I've settled on for a dewatering pump:

WilTec


It will shift over 40 cubic meters of water per hour with a head of up to 2.5 meters or so, which is more than 10,000 gallons per hour.

That will keep up with any broken sea cock on my boat -- a 2" through hull 18" below the surface will flow about 6,000 gallons per hour.

The key things here are that the pump is:

1. mobile; and
2. it will eat up trash and debris.

Anyone who has ever used a bilge pump in anger knows that they quickly clog up, because flooding washes all kinds of carp out of even the cleanest bilge. That has sunk many boats, I have no doubt.

Its mobility means that it can be used to save someone else's boat, besides my own, or can be moved to another location if needed. Also means that it can be pulled up out of the bilge to unclog it if necessary, although being capable of dealing with 2" particles, it shouldn't clog at all hopefully. Although the beast weighs 33kg, so not easy in a seaway and/or single handed.

It will live in my main bilge with the roll-up 3" firehose type discharge hose attached.

It draws 2.2 kW and will be powered by my inverter or by my generator. In order to be sure that I can use it even if the water is knee-deep, I will install a changeover box on my generator which will allow me to disconnect the ship's power system and plug directly into the generator, which lives well above the waterline and should be dry right to the end in a flooding situation.


I have five other bilge pumps including a large manual one, two Whale "supersubs" for maintenance of main bilge and engine bilge, and a pair of Rule 4000 gallon per hour jumbo pumps.

The Rule pumps might be able to keep up with a broken through hull but only if they don't clog. The clogging issue, and the desire to have a means to fight flooding with overwhelming force, is what has driven me to the trash pump.


The trash pump can also be used as an excellent fire pump. I will buy a nozzle for the hose for this purpose.
That's quite a beast. Similar and much larger navy damage control pumps are all mechanically driven for reliability and portability. I couldnt follow the link. I assume its powered from a mains AC supply.

2.2kW will overwhelm your average cruising yacht inverter. That is also quite a load for the average genset.

What size inverter, battery bank and genset are you using?

We certainly couldn't run that pump with our 2500W inverter, 675Ahr battery bank or 1cyl 6kW genset with a 130A 12V alternator.

Sent from my SM-N900T using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
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