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Old 15-02-2016, 19:12   #1
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USA to UK

Just doing a bit of armchair sailing. Practically speaking if one were to hop up the East coast of the US with a plan of heading across the Atlantic to the UK. Where would be a good place to make a final departure (and it may be Canada), where would be a good place to head to in the UK bearing in mind not the most experienced sailer, and how long would an average crossing take.

I gave just been playing around with Blue Chart and it looks like 1850kn at about 7kn looks to be about 11 days. Is this practical ?

P.s. I won't be taking the Laser
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Old 15-02-2016, 19:23   #2
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Re: USA to UK

Amazon.com: World Cruising Routes: 7th edition: 1000 Sailing Routes In All Oceans Of The World (World Cruising Series) eBook: Jimmy Cornell: Books
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Old 15-02-2016, 19:39   #3
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Re: USA to UK

For starters, knots are a measure of speed, not distance. The 1850kts figure would be nautical miles, not knots lol.
I'll let the ocean crossers answer your other questions.
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Old 15-02-2016, 19:51   #4
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Re: USA to UK

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Originally Posted by FSMike View Post
For starters, knots are a measure of speed, not distance. The 1850kts figure would be nautical miles, not knots lol.
I'll let the ocean crossers answer your other questions.
I like the supersonic option.

Cruisers I have discussed this with recommend we exit the St Lawrence and bump the south of Newfoundland, Greenland and make landfall in Scotland. It is the great circle short rout. Estimate 2 to 3 weeks. I am not keen on the North Atlantic but that could be the plan depending on the time of season. If it is late season when we get to the Atlantic we will surely turn south.


How many knots do you make in that armchair?
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Old 15-02-2016, 20:15   #5
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Re: USA to UK

The common jumping off point is Newport, Halifax or anywhere in between. It is going to be wet and foggy. Late Summer is better to avoid iceberg. This is a trip has me thinking for a while, but no gut to act upon. I will most likely to an easy way to sail to Azores and to the mainland of Europe. Perhaps find a way to UK.

It is lot of planning. Jimmy Cornell's book is your friend. Don't forget to study the Pilot Charts. It is a good mental exercise.
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Old 15-02-2016, 20:21   #6
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Re: USA to UK

You might check out this guy's video series:



Cheers/ Len
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Old 15-02-2016, 20:54   #7
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Re: USA to UK

Thanks for the advice, as far as the arm chair is concerned my ass is stationary but the mind is all over the world..!
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Old 15-02-2016, 20:58   #8
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Re: USA to UK

Can one still purchase QE2 tickets?

Sent from my SM-T230NU using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
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Old 15-02-2016, 21:44   #9
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Re: USA to UK

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Thanks for the advice, as far as the arm chair is concerned my ass is stationary but the mind is all over the world..!
Nothing wrong with that. Any great adventure starts with a vision. The ocean will be there when you are ready.
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Old 16-02-2016, 01:26   #10
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Re: USA to UK

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You might check out this guy's video series:



Cheers/ Len
Was the knock down at 2:45? It didn't look like a knockdown to me.
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Old 16-02-2016, 03:07   #11
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Re: USA to UK

Hello,

We are planning to make this exact trip this summer. The choice of route has been a bit of a struggle for us too.

Provided the iceberg picture is reasonable, we are intending to cross from St. John's NFLD in late July. If there is too much ice, we'll either depart from Maine or Halifax.

We've done a lot of offshore sailing, and we're looking forward to this passage less than any we've done previously. We are more partial to the Northern route than further south mostly just due to the shorter distance involved. We have a pretty fast boat, and in decent wind, 200-250 miles per day is common. We figure that we can at least have a shot at getting across without getting thrashed too badly, but I'm still putting the odds of getting a F8+ at about even.

Transiting further south, there's still the issue of getting up to the UK. Go all the way to the Azores, and it's reported to be a struggle to get the northing needed. And, the more southerly route is generally less attractive in July, thanks to the threat of TRS's, which is the time we have to make this trip anyway, thanks to work obligations. Perhaps if we could leave in June, this would be more attractive.

I post here from time to time, we'll share some observations when we're across.

Good sailing, TJ
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Old 16-02-2016, 03:19   #12
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Re: USA to UK

If I recall correctly Jimmy Cornell recommends departing from New England from May-June, head south to forty degrees north latitude, then head east until you are clear of the Grand Banks before turning north.

Follow Jimmy's advice. Make the right passage at the right time of the year!

I made a July departure with someone who had a work schedule and who wanted to take a northerly route. Guess what happened? We took a beating, broke some gear, and had to bail out at the Azores! So much for his schedule....
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Old 16-02-2016, 03:41   #13
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Re: USA to UK

We are certainly very much aware of the pitfalls of the more northerly route, and don't take the choice lightly.

However, there are a lot of boats which do this route just fine. (Not to mention running around Greenland, Iceland, Faroes, etc.) We were in St. John's last summer, and we met a few boats who departed from there (in August), and they had decent passages.

You pays your money and you take your chances. I don't necessarily think that going down to 40N really buys all that much extra safety. A bit, but it's still a rough stretch of water, whether at 40 or 50. Anyway, you need to turn North at some point... The New England departure also increases time offshore. Where we can get a decent window to at least get across the Grand Banks leaving from St. John's, (and indeed for close to the first half of the passage at our speed), the added 1000 miles or so do increase exposure.

Bottom line, for a W-E crossing, at whatever normal latitude for the trip, you very well might get your butt handed to you.

There are quite a number of boats who get a really sound thrashing taking the 'right' route at the 'right' time of year too.

For our part, we've made sure the boat's totally up to snuff, and we have enough miles behind us to be able to deal with what comes our way. But, as I said in my previous post, we're not really looking forward to this one.

Here's hoping for some decent luck.

Good sailing, TJ
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Old 16-02-2016, 04:11   #14
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Re: USA to UK

I dunno. I wish you a safe passage and I am sure you will be fine. Just when I hear someone say "The choice route has been a bit of a struggle for us too" it sounds like a red flag. Clearly you are conflicted.
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Old 16-02-2016, 04:20   #15
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Re: USA to UK

Quote:
Originally Posted by cal40john View Post
Was the knock down at 2:45? It didn't look like a knockdown to me.
Hi He posted a series of youtube vids of this crossing. He got knocked & broke a rib east of Greenland & had to turn around & head back to UK. Singlehanded in a small junk rigged boat. I watched the whole series a year or so ago. They are on youtube under junkming & photos at simplesailor.com

Here is a link to the broken rib aftermath.

There are many more vids on youtube re Atlantic west to east crossings.
It has been done safely & successfully by many but careful planning,proper gear,back up plan(s) & a healthy dose of respect for the Atlantic would seem warranted.

The OP asked for information. My intent was not to discourage him-only to "open his eyes" to the seriousness of crossing 3000+ miles of un-predictable & notoriously changeable ocean. As we say on the East Coast-If you don't like the weather-wait 15 minutes.

This link shows wind & current(especially the Gulf Stream). I have never done the crossing-would love to-but waited to long-too old & health now. I would think following the Gulf Stream could be a great help,but no experience so I defer to those who are experienced & wish OP the best!
http://earth.nullschool.net/#current...4.48,35.65,929

Cheers/ Len
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