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Old 13-03-2015, 18:39   #76
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrong View Post
Thanks for keeping notes related to rooting and recovery for Galaxy Tab P1000 owners. If you can remember, let me know what kinds of problems you encountered following my instructions.
Ok Wrong, here is my critique (and my apologies for sounding like a New York Post film critic):

Step 1
Rather than refer users to Wikipedia to determine their ARM processor type, it's probably easier to first guide them the their tablet or phone's Settings>About Phone>CPU info which should provide this.

In general, I think you are offering too many app options e.g. 2 GPS apps, 2 VNC apps, multiple deployers and Linux distro's etc. Decide on one that does the job and stay with it. You can advise more technical users of alternatives (perhaps in a "Notes for Advanced Users" section, or whatever).

The GPS information you mention is early into your installation guide. This is probably best covered last as it seems a few people don't bother with GPS. Talk of GPS capability in relation to the generation of NMEA sentences at this point is wasted on most users. Best to just go with something that will work in any case, I think.

Another thing that would be best to avoid if possible is referring to other sites to complete parts of the process. The problem I see with this is that the linked sites often have too much information which is both confusing and can make the relevant information difficult to find and digest.

It's so easy to download the source from GitHub, compile and install that I'd almost forget about trying to build installation packages. If anything, perhaps develop a script that will download, compile and install in on operation. I purposely went with no compilation options and didn't change to any specific folders after opening the terminal except for the mkdir build and cd build prior to compiling.

Continuing on with the theme of too many options, listing installation instructions for both installation packages and source code compiling on different Linux flavours is to me the bit that makes the whole installation look just too difficult. The section is also before the section on Linux Deploy which, too me, places it out of step. I'd suggest sticking with Linux Deploy's default options (maybe explaining alternatives in the before mentioned Advanced section at the end of the guide) and limit to specific guide instructions only for that configuration (in the present case that would be Debian/Wheezy)

Step 2
Linux Deploy is easy to install and configure. I think the instructions needed for an OpenCPN install should just be included in the guide. Don't bother mentioning anything else (except again for the "Advanced" section). The average user won't care as long as the selected choice works.

Step 3
Again stick with the better of the two VNC viewers and just list alternatives in the Advanced section if required.

Step 3A
Too much technical mumbo-jumbo. I don't care what a "loop" file system is. I just want to be reassured that it won't brick my device.

When I installed Linux Deploy, I changed no options. I have no idea where the 4GB partition size would have been set as I couldn't find this option. I still don't know what size partition was created, but I would conclude whatever the default is is ok and any reference to changing this should be included if required in the Advanced section.

This entire piece of text:

Once the installation is complete mount the loop filesystem following the steps below.

Open the android terminal.

Type 'su' at the prompt
Press <enter>

Copy/paste or type:

'/data/local/linux/bin/linuxdeploy shell'

and press <enter>

Create a root password:

Type at the terminal prompt
passwd root
press enter

Supply a password you will not forget! Re-enter the password as requested. You will need this password when logging into a terminal from within the linux vnc desktop.

Your Linux file system is now 'mounted' and fully accessible.


Made absolutely no sense. I used the "Android Terminal" installed by CyanogenMod ROM and no matter what I tried, even finding that "linuxdeploy" was within a different folder didn't work. I very nearly gave up at this point, but because I am familiar with Linux (I use Ubuntu on my work PC) I changed the "su" password in a Linux Terminal using sudo passwd root. However, because I've never been asked to enter the password again during any sudo command, I'm not even sure this is used on the particular Debian distro at all??? Even now I don't know if guide was trying to instruct me to change the Android OS su password or the Linux distro's su password.

The other point from this step is that I didn't need to use FX file manager at all and didn't need to move, copy or change permissions of any files.

Again, if OpenGL doesn't work - don't mention it in the guide. Include in the Advanced section if required.

Step 4
Way too many options. focus on one that works and just show the instructions for that. In my experience, the whole of section 4 could be summarised as:

Run this command in LXTerminal to install prerequisites...
sudo apt-get install libgtk2.0-dev gettext git-core cmake gpsd gpsd-clients libgps-dev build-essential wx-common libwxgtk2.8-dev libglu1-mesa-dev libgtk2.0-dev wx2.8-headers libbz2-dev libtinyxml-dev libportaudio2 portaudio19-dev


Step 5
I ignored this step entirely and instead and used the instructions from the main site for installing OpenCPN from source using the GitHub repository, summarised as:

Run these commands in LXTerminal to compile and install OpenCPN
git clone git://github.com/OpenCPN/OpenCPN.git
cd opencpn
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ..
make
sudo make install


It's actually the commands shown above in 4 & 5 that I think could be put into a script to really simplify the installation if working with a specific installation.

Step 6
Using bVNC Free setting "servername" and "password" values was all that was required.

Step 7
No problem here

Finally
Although setting up charts inside OpenCPN is part of the main OpenCPN documentation, I think a section here needs to include installing charts in a nice simple way to the device. IMO the easiest method is to copy to the external SD and then make reference how to find this SD card using the File Manager located in the Linux distro. Trying to explain how to copy and move is confusing for new chums and old hands will already know how to do this if that's what they want to do.

And my BIGGEST gripe. There is no information shown on how to actually hook up the GPS to OpenCPN. If you understand the tech involved this is probably really easy. If you're dopey like me it is really hard. Once I'd figured out that "Turbo GPS 3" no longer includes an NMEA server and doesn't work and that "GPS Share Wifi" doesn't really explain what it does but has an NMEA server feature and had fiddle I got it to work and it only requires a few steps that is easy to follow, even for us dummies. Unfortunately the guide does not include these steps.

And finally, perhaps versioning these guides to allow for changes over time as the associated apps evolve along with an included list of devices and android versions the guide has been successfully applied to would also help give the less tech savvy among us the confidence to give it a go on a spare or superseded tablet, at least.
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Old 14-03-2015, 07:22   #77
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrong View Post
If you started the installation with Debian which was successful, then simply switched to another distribution without first removing the installed environment it won't work. Imagine trying to install Fedora when the sources.txt file still lists repositories for Debian...
If I remember correctly I started with Fedora , then Ubuntu and then all others in no particular order. Each one failed at a different step of the installation process with different error msgs. Last one I tried was Debian and this one worked.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrong View Post
I have forewarned people that installing on high resolution devices, 1920 x 1200 will display OpenCPN features as tiny. Best to save your money and buy two lightly used 1280X800 android tablets for as little as 35-40% of what a Nexus 10 or comperable tablet will cost.
I was aware of this issue but that is what my primary tablet has. In fact the excellent screen was the main reasons for buying the Memopad.
A screen with 1280x800 on 10" results in roughly 150ppi. That is OK for a tablet dedicated only to navigation but for an everyday tablet or phone I prefer >=250ppi. My 2012 Nexus 7 has 216ppi and this is really the lower end tolerable to my eyes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrong View Post
My files?
No from
SourceForge.net


Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrong View Post
You did this because your Memopad has no GPS?
No, because I already decided to permanently install and integrate my windows tablet as the onboard computer. The tablet is just a mobile add-on to it but needs AIS to justify the effort involved with OpenCPN. Without AIS I don't see the point of using OpenCPN on my tablet, as I already have Navionics which is way easier and good enough if it's just about looking up where you are.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrong View Post
i386 for which platform? armhf? You're computer?
I don't get what you mean by i386 for armhf? i386 is the common platform name for intel based systems.
I installed opencpn_4.0.0-1~wheezy_i386.deb on my Asus Memopad FHD 10" which has an Intel Atom Z2560 processor. (Beware: The 3G model of the FHD has a different processor, IIRC some ARM architecture)


I read your guide two times and was confused afterwards. Reefmagnet has summed it up quite well, so no point in adding to that.

Anyway I simply started my installation without a guide.

My steps from memory:
1) Install Linux deploy and have it install & start Debian
2) Open VNC to connect to the linux desktop (which I did from my desktop PC to use big screen, keyboard and mouse)
3) open linux terminal
4) wget the appropriate opencpn .deb package file from the sourceforge link above
5) sudo dpkg -i opencpn_4.0.0-1~wheezy_i386.deb
6) sudo apt-get -f install
7) Start OpenCPN and configure it.

And thats all. I left out the details of getting charts (which I downloaded right from my NAS, so that's very specific).

I played around a bit using bVNC on the tablet, didn't like it much and removed everything. I don't see much of a benefit in my particular setup.
Useability and ergonomics are IMO not a strength of this approach, especially on modern high resolution screens. And even if you don't like to hear it: I still consider chroot OpenCPN a niche hack (any chroot approach on Android is just a workaround and not a sound architecture).

Native OpenCPN on Android is going to be a game changer. And its coming!!
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Old 14-03-2015, 09:20   #78
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reefmagnet View Post
Ok Wrong, here is my critique (and my apologies for sounding like a New York Post film critic):

Step 1
Rather than refer users to Wikipedia to determine their ARM processor type, it's probably easier to first guide them the their tablet or phone's Settings>About Phone>CPU info which should provide this.

In general, I think you are offering too many app options e.g. 2 GPS apps, 2 VNC apps, multiple deployers and Linux distro's etc. Decide on one that does the job and stay with it. You can advise more technical users of alternatives (perhaps in a "Notes for Advanced Users" section, or whatever).

The GPS information you mention is early into your installation guide. This is probably best covered last as it seems a few people don't bother with GPS. Talk of GPS capability in relation to the generation of NMEA sentences at this point is wasted on most users. Best to just go with something that will work in any case, I think.

Another thing that would be best to avoid if possible is referring to other sites to complete parts of the process. The problem I see with this is that the linked sites often have too much information which is both confusing and can make the relevant information difficult to find and digest.

It's so easy to download the source from GitHub, compile and install that I'd almost forget about trying to build installation packages. If anything, perhaps develop a script that will download, compile and install in on operation. I purposely went with no compilation options and didn't change to any specific folders after opening the terminal except for the mkdir build and cd build prior to compiling.

Continuing on with the theme of too many options, listing installation instructions for both installation packages and source code compiling on different Linux flavours is to me the bit that makes the whole installation look just too difficult. The section is also before the section on Linux Deploy which, too me, places it out of step. I'd suggest sticking with Linux Deploy's default options (maybe explaining alternatives in the before mentioned Advanced section at the end of the guide) and limit to specific guide instructions only for that configuration (in the present case that would be Debian/Wheezy)

Step 2
Linux Deploy is easy to install and configure. I think the instructions needed for an OpenCPN install should just be included in the guide. Don't bother mentioning anything else (except again for the "Advanced" section). The average user won't care as long as the selected choice works.

Step 3
Again stick with the better of the two VNC viewers and just list alternatives in the Advanced section if required.

Step 3A
Too much technical mumbo-jumbo. I don't care what a "loop" file system is. I just want to be reassured that it won't brick my device.

When I installed Linux Deploy, I changed no options. I have no idea where the 4GB partition size would have been set as I couldn't find this option. I still don't know what size partition was created, but I would conclude whatever the default is is ok and any reference to changing this should be included if required in the Advanced section.

This entire piece of text:

Once the installation is complete mount the loop filesystem following the steps below.

Open the android terminal.

Type 'su' at the prompt
Press <enter>

Copy/paste or type:

'/data/local/linux/bin/linuxdeploy shell'

and press <enter>

Create a root password:

Type at the terminal prompt
passwd root
press enter

Supply a password you will not forget! Re-enter the password as requested. You will need this password when logging into a terminal from within the linux vnc desktop.

Your Linux file system is now 'mounted' and fully accessible.


Made absolutely no sense. I used the "Android Terminal" installed by CyanogenMod ROM and no matter what I tried, even finding that "linuxdeploy" was within a different folder didn't work. I very nearly gave up at this point, but because I am familiar with Linux (I use Ubuntu on my work PC) I changed the "su" password in a Linux Terminal using sudo passwd root. However, because I've never been asked to enter the password again during any sudo command, I'm not even sure this is used on the particular Debian distro at all??? Even now I don't know if guide was trying to instruct me to change the Android OS su password or the Linux distro's su password.

The other point from this step is that I didn't need to use FX file manager at all and didn't need to move, copy or change permissions of any files.

Again, if OpenGL doesn't work - don't mention it in the guide. Include in the Advanced section if required.

Step 4
Way too many options. focus on one that works and just show the instructions for that. In my experience, the whole of section 4 could be summarised as:

Run this command in LXTerminal to install prerequisites...
sudo apt-get install libgtk2.0-dev gettext git-core cmake gpsd gpsd-clients libgps-dev build-essential wx-common libwxgtk2.8-dev libglu1-mesa-dev libgtk2.0-dev wx2.8-headers libbz2-dev libtinyxml-dev libportaudio2 portaudio19-dev


Step 5
I ignored this step entirely and instead and used the instructions from the main site for installing OpenCPN from source using the GitHub repository, summarised as:

Run these commands in LXTerminal to compile and install OpenCPN
git clone git://github.com/OpenCPN/OpenCPN.git
cd opencpn
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ..
make
sudo make install


It's actually the commands shown above in 4 & 5 that I think could be put into a script to really simplify the installation if working with a specific installation.

Step 6
Using bVNC Free setting "servername" and "password" values was all that was required.

Step 7
No problem here

Finally
Although setting up charts inside OpenCPN is part of the main OpenCPN documentation, I think a section here needs to include installing charts in a nice simple way to the device. IMO the easiest method is to copy to the external SD and then make reference how to find this SD card using the File Manager located in the Linux distro. Trying to explain how to copy and move is confusing for new chums and old hands will already know how to do this if that's what they want to do.

And my BIGGEST gripe. There is no information shown on how to actually hook up the GPS to OpenCPN. If you understand the tech involved this is probably really easy. If you're dopey like me it is really hard. Once I'd figured out that "Turbo GPS 3" no longer includes an NMEA server and doesn't work and that "GPS Share Wifi" doesn't really explain what it does but has an NMEA server feature and had fiddle I got it to work and it only requires a few steps that is easy to follow, even for us dummies. Unfortunately the guide does not include these steps.

And finally, perhaps versioning these guides to allow for changes over time as the associated apps evolve along with an included list of devices and android versions the guide has been successfully applied to would also help give the less tech savvy among us the confidence to give it a go on a spare or superseded tablet, at least.
Excellent summation and recommendations. For me at least, the tendency is to anticipate and supply guidance I imagine anyone reading the instructions may need in advance. This no doubt adds rather than reduces confusion. Early on, resistance by people to try Linux and OpenCPN on their androids was no gps. Didn't matter that coordinates from an external gps could be plugged into a dropped mark to show your position on the chart. So, with help from others we worked feverishly to find solutions to the gps problem. My gratitude to those who actually discovered GPS Share WIFI is deep. The only progress attributable to me in the gps arena was working out what's necessary to use an external usb Garmin with OpenCPN in the chroot setup.

I'll definitly edit the instructions per your comments ASAP.



So, wanting people to know early in the instructions gps does work is important.
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Old 14-03-2015, 13:49   #79
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

I am computer challenged. I would like to try OPN cpn but I am watching for an inexpensive and more importantly easy for non computer types instruction.

I read through Wrong's instructions and did not understand too much of what was done. As ReefMagnet said there are too many choices. And the links to the other sites were like dropping a kid from the farm in downtown Manhattan. Simplify! I don't want to choose between things I know nothing about. I say you pick the things that will make it stable and reliable and say "This one."

Thanks for your efforts.
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Old 14-03-2015, 14:12   #80
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by darylat8750 View Post
I am computer challenged. I would like to try OPN cpn but I am watching for an inexpensive and more importantly easy for non computer types instruction.

I read through Wrong's instructions and did not understand too much of what was done. As ReefMagnet said there are too many choices. And the links to the other sites were like dropping a kid from the farm in downtown Manhattan. Simplify! I don't want to choose between things I know nothing about. I say you pick the things that will make it stable and reliable and say "This one."

Thanks for your efforts.
Aright! Aright!

I get it.

Give me at least a cuppa days, o.k?

You're welcome.
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Old 14-03-2015, 21:36   #81
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

My iPad came in the mail today and I've got it online and through the basic setup. My next question is whether I should use iNavX or Navionics as a charting program? I have Navionics on my iPhone and have used it a little and it seems like a good program. But iNavX also seems popular. They each cost about $50. So, especially if you have used or have knowledge of both these apps, which one should I choose to use on my iPad and why?
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Old 14-03-2015, 22:22   #82
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

jtsailjt, take a look at PolarView from PolarNavy as well.

Free for iPad. Designed for touch screen operation. Free enc charts from noaa if you're US based.

Primary nav program now for me since I killed my Garmin 441s.
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Old 14-03-2015, 22:32   #83
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

.......I use an iSathone with an OnsatMail account for passage weather, requesting GRIBs from Saildocs. Cost is roughly 2 USD per day for airtime.

In the Med I use an old Sangean SSB receiver placed beside my android phone to receive Navtex. Haven't tried that for weatherfax yet.


I just checked the Watchmate. It will read all NMEA from your boat instruments and repeat that on it's NMEA output and USB ports, muxed together with AIS and it's GPS information.
It's just two wires and you have all data (instruments, DSC, GPS and AIS) on the PC. IF your instruments support NMEA, of course.

BTW: With all data available on a low-power always-on PC or tablet maybe you can re-think the Watchmate investment. There may be other AIS transponders available without a dedicated display that also include a muxer but cost considerably less. Like the OceanSat for half the price (at least over here).......



Rabbi,
some remarks about you post:
That 'windows-USB-stick-computer' you're talking about seems to be the future. Only, why would you want to have a computer running on a boat without the display on?
I tend to think a tablet is the way to go for me, simpler and cheaper than a mini PC and less power consumption.
Getting an AIS without a dedicated display but connect it to the laptop instead is a bit against my believe that stand alone units are better to have. Maybe I should be more open minded about it. I had a look at a Vesper XB-8000, very impressive! AIS and GPS connected to the tablet and no more cables.
I looked into the option of getting a satphone and receive GRIB files that way some time ago but decided against it for cost reasons.
A solar emergency USB charger for the worst case scenario is an excellent idea! (and so is the sextant which I still keep on the boat...)
You might be aware that there is an other thread on tablets, 'Windows 8 Tablets for OpenCPN'. Very good info there as well.
Luckily I'm not rushed in buying my tablet, I seem to change my mind daily...
I'm looking forward to read you report about you new installations after you'll be back from you boat.
Thanks for you help!
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Old 14-03-2015, 22:49   #84
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

jtsailjt, just noticed your OP comment about vector charts. So wanted to add PolarView does raster charts as well.

BTW, can't believe you didn't get an Andriod tab and make Opencpn work on it. Look at all rootin' and Debian distro fun you missed out on. :-)
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Old 15-03-2015, 06:54   #85
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by goingplaces View Post
That 'windows-USB-stick-computer' you're talking about seems to be the future. Only, why would you want to have a computer running on a boat without the display on?
This little computer will also act as my boat's access point, connecting to 3G and / or free local wifi networks using a strong antenna, and allowing my tablets to access the internet where they can normally not. It will also run Bittorrent sync, a tool that keeps a set of directories and files in sync across all my devices (like all kind of scanned documents, manuals, etc). And it's my MP3 music machine wired to the amplifier. No need for a screen most of the time.
Also during navigation I typically use the computer only for frequent short checks. So the screen would be off most of the time anyway.


Quote:
Originally Posted by goingplaces View Post
I tend to think a tablet is the way to go for me, simpler and cheaper than a mini PC and less power consumption.
The mini PC that I linked to is basically a tablet without a screen, same technology. However it's a niche product, and will always be - while tablets are plenty. So I would say that a tablet will be the better choice with regards to quality, maturity, reliability and bang for the buck.
But I think a tablet should be wireless (except charging of course) or should be permanently installed. Otherwise it easily becomes a mess of cables.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goingplaces View Post
Getting an AIS without a dedicated display but connect it to the laptop instead is a bit against my believe that stand alone units are better to have. Maybe I should be more open minded about it. I had a look at a Vesper XB-8000, very impressive! AIS and GPS connected to the tablet and no more cables.
If you are setting up a new system something like the Vesper XP8000 migh be a good choice, so the tablet can be fully wireless.
Just check that it is compatible with OpenCPN first.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goingplaces View Post
I'm looking forward to read you report about you new installations after you'll be back from you boat.
Don't hold your breath, I'll be back only in mid April.
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Old 15-03-2015, 07:04   #86
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbi View Post
If I remember correctly I started with Fedora , then Ubuntu and then all others in no particular order. Each one failed at a different step of the installation process with different error msgs. Last one I tried was Debian and this one worked.
If you tried them all without performing 'Settings' (Three vertical dots) 'Operating Environment>'Remove Environment' before trying a different distribution you'll end up with any partially downloaded/installed files from you last failed attempt corrupting the next install attempt.

How you managed to succeed with Debian is a mystery.

Quote:
I was aware of this issue but that is what my primary tablet has. In fact the excellent screen was the main reasons for buying the Memopad.
A screen with 1280x800 on 10" results in roughly 150ppi. That is OK for a tablet dedicated only to navigation but for an everyday tablet or phone I prefer >=250ppi. My 2012 Nexus 7 has 216ppi and this is really the lower end tolerable to my eyes.
Aright.

Quote:
No from
SourceForge.net
O.k. You compiled from source then?

Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrong View Post
You did this through tcp, i.p. to get gps and AIS from your computer because your Memopad has no GPS?
Quote:
No, because I already decided to permanently install and integrate my windows tablet as the onboard computer. The tablet is just a mobile add-on to it but needs AIS to justify the effort involved with OpenCPN. Without AIS I don't see the point of using OpenCPN on my tablet, as I already have Navionics which is way easier and good enough if it's just about looking up where you are.
Aright.

Quote:
I don't get what you mean by i386 for armhf? i386 is the common platform name for intel based systems.
I installed opencpn_4.0.0-1~wheezy_i386.deb on my Asus Memopad FHD 10" which has an Intel Atom Z2560 processor. (Beware: The 3G model of the FHD has a different processor, IIRC some ARM architecture)
I assumed your tablet was an android, ARM architecture. And why not since this whole exercise is about installing Linux and OpenCPN on android tablets. How can a ARM Linux distribution installed by Linux Deploy and a plain vanilla i386.deb file run on your intel i386 tablet together?

Quote:
I read your guide two times and was confused afterwards. Reefmagnet has summed it up quite well, so no point in adding to that.
Fixed. Simplified instructions will be posted sometime today.

Quote:
Anyway I simply started my installation without a guide.

My steps from memory:
1) Install Linux deploy and have it install & start Debian
2) Open VNC to connect to the linux desktop (which I did from my desktop PC to use big screen, keyboard and mouse)
Quote:
3) open linux terminal
4) wget the appropriate opencpn .deb package file from the sourceforge link above
5) sudo dpkg -i opencpn_4.0.0-1~wheezy_i386.deb
6) sudo apt-get -f install
7) Start OpenCPN and configure it.
So, did you perform steps 3-7 on your computer or the tablet?

Quote:
And thats all. I left out the details of getting charts (which I downloaded right from my NAS, so that's very specific).

I played around a bit using bVNC on the tablet, didn't like it much and removed everything. I don't see much of a benefit in my particular setup.
Useability and ergonomics are IMO not a strength of this approach, especially on modern high resolution screens.
Quote:
And even if you don't like to hear it: I still consider chroot OpenCPN a niche hack (any chroot approach on Android is just a workaround and not a sound architecture).
I think your need to talk down something I and others worked hard to develop is rude/unneccessary, and your appraisal of Android is off the mark. This coming from a dyed in the wool linux fan who'd love to have linux running natively on any tablet. In spite of my pro-Linux stance I have come to appreciate android. Respect? Well, that's another matter having more to do with Google than the O.S..

Quote:
Native OpenCPN on Android is going to be a game changer. And its coming!!
Probably. And for anyone who enjoys using linux applications on their android device, including OpenCPN, it will not affect the utility of having Linux running alongside android in a chroot environment.
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Old 15-03-2015, 10:50   #87
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

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Originally Posted by Wrong View Post
If you tried them all without performing 'Settings' (Three vertical dots) 'Operating Environment>'Remove Environment' before trying a different distribution you'll end up with any partially downloaded/installed files from you last failed attempt corrupting the next install attempt.
Linux Deploy created a fresh filesystem with every new install, removing the old one. So I assume you don't need to manually remove but maybe you are right.

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I
O.k. You compiled from source then?
Nope. If you follow the sourceforge link I posted this will take you to the download section with compiled packages. I just needed the dependencies which apt-get took care of.

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Originally Posted by Wrong View Post
How can a ARM Linux distribution installed by Linux Deploy and a plain vanilla i386.deb file run on your intel i386 tablet together?
You assume that Linux Deploy is limited to ARM which it is not. If it were then it would not even show up on my tablet. On an intel tablet it installs an i386 distro.
But I guess this is the reason why most distros failed, because intel architecture for android is not that common and therefore not so well tested.

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So, did you perform steps 3-7 on your computer or the tablet?
All steps were executed on the tablet.

I only used RealVNC on the PC instead of bVNC on the tablet to connect to the linux desktop. Gives bigger screen, keyboard and mouse.

bVNC came only into play once I wanted to get the real feeling of how useable this setup really is.


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I think your need to talk down something I and others worked hard to develop is rude/unneccessary, and your appraisal of Android is off the mark. This coming from a dyed in the wool linux fan who'd love to have linux running natively on any tablet. In spite of my pro-Linux stance I have come to appreciate android. Respect? Well, that's another matter having more to do with Google than the O.S..

I am not downtalking but more giving my impression.

BTW: I have nothing against linux. Far from, I have been working with it for years, own several devices running linux and love it for what it can do. But here it's just a workaround.
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Old 15-03-2015, 11:23   #88
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

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<snip>

I am not downtalking but more giving my impression.

BTW: I have nothing against linux. Far from, I have been working with it for years, own several devices running linux and love it for what it can do. But here it's just a workaround.
Linux installed on android devices in a chroot environment works. And, so does OpenCPN.

So, why say things that are based on your limited experience, using a device with a higher resolution than I recommend, that does not yet meet your needs simply because nobody has yet tried to get AIS to work; when your remarks may discourage others from giving it a go?

Maybe it's an ego thing for you, eh?
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Old 15-03-2015, 11:27   #89
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

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I am computer challenged. I would like to try OPN cpn but I am watching for an inexpensive and more importantly easy for non computer types instruction.

I read through Wrong's instructions and did not understand too much of what was done. As ReefMagnet said there are too many choices. And the links to the other sites were like dropping a kid from the farm in downtown Manhattan. Simplify! I don't want to choose between things I know nothing about. I say you pick the things that will make it stable and reliable and say "This one."

Thanks for your efforts.
Hint. Try to understand nothing. Just do what the instructions say to do. You'll be alight.

Simplified Instructions are up. Building on Motorola Xoom | Official OpenCPN Homepage
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Old 15-03-2015, 12:50   #90
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Re: Tablet Navigation?

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Originally Posted by Wrong View Post
Linux installed on android devices in a chroot environment works. And, so does OpenCPN.

So, why say things that are based on your limited experience, using a device with a higher resolution than I recommend, that does not yet meet your needs simply because nobody has yet tried to get AIS to work; when your remarks may discourage others from giving it a go?

Maybe it's an ego thing for you, eh?
Nope. My Ego doesn't care about computer stuff.
I am a professional system architect, designing large scale enterprise IT systems for a living. I can tell the difference between a sound architecture and a workaround.
And I have a negative view on workarounds. Even if the workaround works in most cases.

But even if that were not the case, useability of the result is mediocre. Not only because the desktop becomes less useable if you have a good screen. Using background processes like Linux Deploy and GPS share plus a peephole like VNC is not the best way to achieve 5* ergonomics.

BTW: As written in another post AIS works out of the box.

Let's agree that we disagree. You love your baby, I don't.

This is my last post on this topic.
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