Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 05-07-2007, 12:43   #1
Registered User
 
MysticGringo's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Southern Chesapeake
Boat: Sabre 42
Posts: 170
Custom Log book

Well... I finally own my first sailboat. It was a journey to get to this point, but it became totally worth it on the delivery passage when we shut the motor down, raised sails... and listened to the water flow by.

I ordered a log book for her, that I intended to use, but found it contained way too much extranious information... things I was likely to never use. I like the idea of keeping a log, just for sake of record keeping... and for memories, so I have designed my own logbook page which I believe has all the information I would likely record.

Since this is my first sailboat, and therefore my first logbook... I would like to see if you all would take a look at it, and tell me if I am missing anything, or give other comments. Its in Google Doc's spreadsheet, and I can share it easily if people would like to have it to use, or modify for themselves. Here's a web-link to it.

Google Docs & Spreadsheets - Mystic Venture Passage Log

Not sure the link works real well in IE... sorry if it doesn't.
Thanks.

-Russ

(My blog will soon have an entry about our 5 day delivery on an unkown boat, not knowing how to actually sail, in unkown waters... and the experiences).
__________________

__________________
--Russ
www.SailVellamo.com
MysticGringo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2007, 13:44   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
JusDreaming's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Stuart, FL & Bahamas Cruising
Boat: Lagoon 37
Posts: 880
Images: 13
Captn's Log - The new way to record your boating adventures. is the electronic log I use. It gives summaries and calculates info, as it is based on Excel spread sheet. As for as a paper log yours looks good, but my paper log also has maintenance sections and various other sections which comes in handy. Does your's have formulas imbedded?
__________________

__________________
Denny and Diane
Lagoon 37
http://www.svjusdreaming.bravehost.com/
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/svjusdreaming/
"The only way to get a good crew is to marry one." -Eric Hiscock
JusDreaming is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2007, 15:10   #3
Registered User
 
MysticGringo's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Southern Chesapeake
Boat: Sabre 42
Posts: 170
JusDreaming... I am planning on making a seperate log for maintenance and repair work... listing all the parts on hand, used, and needed. As well as prices of things, and include any instruction manuals and such with that. I don't have any equations set up, because I think that this is going to be mainly a paper log... something kept at the nav station and noted when something interesting happens. I don't think I will be logging ever hour, just when something happens. I think I would rather have the passage log, and the maintenance log kept seperate.

I will look more into the link you gave. I think some sort of log book which can tie to my blog would be awesome. It could be awesome if it had a map attached to it so people could see what your location is.

Thanks for looking at it, and your comments.
__________________
--Russ
www.SailVellamo.com
MysticGringo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2007, 03:21   #4
Registered User
 
Sunspot Baby's Avatar

Join Date: May 2003
Location: New Bern, NC
Boat: Prout Manta 38' Catamaran - Sunspot Baby
Posts: 1,521
Images: 14
We all have our own preferences but I have gravitated away from logs with too much structure. They tend to waste space on things I don’t record daily and/or try to force me to use one page per day. Neither of which I consider an advantage.

Like you, I gave up on finding the perfect log book and created my own in Excel. I am on about the third iteration, and it gets simpler each time.

You can see our Log, Maintenance, and Guest Register pages at Log Forms

George
__________________
She took my address and my name
Put my credit to shame
Sunspot Baby, sure had a real good time
Bob Seger
Sunspot Baby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2007, 08:01   #5
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Santa Cruz
Boat: Boatless Again
Posts: 4,321
I took the paper passage log and relabled some of the columns for more appropriate information. On longer passages you want to record position, weather, distance to go, engine usage, and any comments. On shorter trips its nice to record the gps position and depth/holding of your anchorages in case your friends are coming that way later.
__________________
donradcliffe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-12-2007, 09:01   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 6
You should also check out MyShipLog.com it is a very nice and free online ship's log.
__________________
shiplog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-12-2007, 10:13   #7
CF Adviser
 
Pelagic's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2007
Boat: Van Helleman Schooner 65ft StarGazer
Posts: 6,890
I see a big difference between keeping electronic and photographic records of things like Inventory, Yacht Details and Maker’s List and the primary purpose of keeping a proper sailing log.
I also use spreadsheets for managing the yacht, but to me the sailing log is a legal document that should be hand written in ink.
It should demonstrate that you have been an effective watch keeper who has kept track of all of your heading sensors (especially the magnetic compass) and maintained a seamanlike record of changing weather conditions… especially if visability is reduced.
An extreme example; if ever you had to abandon ship due to a collision, grabbing that proper log book might make all the difference in a legal inquiry or inquest.
In court, the simple notation in your well filled log book, “sighted fog bank, reduced to safe speed and posted extra look-outs, running lights on”, would certainly influence the judge especially if the other boat said, “I don’t keep a running log but you should check my blog.“
Sometimes, you just have to prove to others (like your insurance company) that you are competent.
__________________
Pelagic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-12-2007, 13:53   #8
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
Captain Cooks logbook had 2 columns. One was for the date.

__________________
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-12-2007, 14:45   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelagic View Post
I see a big difference between keeping electronic and photographic records of things like Inventory, Yacht Details and Maker’s List and the primary purpose of keeping a proper sailing log.
I also use spreadsheets for managing the yacht, but to me the sailing log is a legal document that should be hand written in ink.
It should demonstrate that you have been an effective watch keeper who has kept track of all of your heading sensors (especially the magnetic compass) and maintained a seamanlike record of changing weather conditions… especially if visability is reduced.
An extreme example; if ever you had to abandon ship due to a collision, grabbing that proper log book might make all the difference in a legal inquiry or inquest.
In court, the simple notation in your well filled log book, “sighted fog bank, reduced to safe speed and posted extra look-outs, running lights on”, would certainly influence the judge especially if the other boat said, “I don’t keep a running log but you should check my blog.“
Sometimes, you just have to prove to others (like your insurance company) that you are competent.
I agree with you that keeping a log up to date is important and should be kept while underway, I also think that as access to the internet grows while at sea, keeping an electronic log on the internet will become more and more ideal as you won't lose those records if the ship is lost at sea since the records are on a land based server.

You can export all your ships logs as excel spreadsheets on MyShipLog and print them out for your hand written on the spot documentation then transfer them to the electronic version for backup and redundant safety for later access.
__________________
shiplog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-12-2007, 14:52   #10
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
If you want a completely legal log that the authorities will not question then it needs to be as follows: It must be in a bound book and the pages must be numbered sequentially. Anything less and you could be accused of altering the log by tearing out a page or adding in a fraudulent page. Also, never block out an entry so that it is illegible. Always put a line through an error so it is readable and then initial where you crossed out the error. Your logbook does not need to describe much more than the date, time, where you are and what you are doing. If it relates to safety, then it should be logged. Logging your MOB drills is a good thing. Adding things like sea state, current and wind that relate to navigation and decisions that you had to make is beneficial. Keep your personal comments such as "It's such a pretty place" in a separate journal, and not the logbook. Extraneous entries, although cute at times, are not a good thing. It makes it look like you do not take the log entries seriously. The best logs are simple and don't have lots of columns, boxes and specific places to enter things everywhere.

Having a separate engine and maintenance log is a good thing..you can have whatever format you want for that since it is only for your usage. If you want to use it to prove maintenance and upgrades performed to a buyer then a bound and numbered one with original receipts attached would be good.

Your logbook is a legal document if you get dragged into court. It is also proof of your activities for many authorities. The Coasties will not recognize an electronic log over a written log. Electronic logs are too easy to alter but they are better than having nothing. I think a logbook is one place where electronics will never replace paper. How can you prove who made an electronic entry for one thing.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-12-2007, 15:24   #11
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
Also, make sure your log has your hull ID number (if applicable) and the documentation number.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-12-2007, 17:00   #12
Registered User
 
sluissa's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pensacola, FL, US
Boat: Westfield UK Kingfisher 20+ - Rabbit
Posts: 402
Images: 4
Send a message via AIM to sluissa
I can understand logging all those things for long distance passages. But simple day sails where you might change course any number of times and travel a rough/undetermined but short distance would be hard to log. I tried logging the first time I went out, but what can you log other than time out if you really have no destination other than returning to where you left from and nothing major happens?

As far as bound books, would a simple legal pad work? It doesn't have numbered pages, but I was just going to use a spare spiral bound notebook I had lying around, but if that won't hold up in court if I happen to need it, and I don't want to pay big bucks for a dedicated ship's log book which may not be what I want, what can I do?
__________________
sluissa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-12-2007, 02:45   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,579
Images: 240
I expect (but don’t know) that any book with a stitched binding, and an identified number of pages (numbered or not) would suffice for legal purposes.
The intent (again, I expect) is to assure that no pages (entries) have been added nor deleted from the original.
I’ve (variously) used an engineer’s/surveyor’s field book, and simple school exercise books, and a daily “Daytimer”.

I recommend 2 or 3 (or more) separate books:
- Deck Log (maintained hourly)
- Legal Ship’s Log (maintained daily)
- Journal or personal diary (maintained sporadically, in my case)
- Mechanical & Stores log (kept mine at the back of my journal) (maintained as needed)
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-12-2007, 04:25   #14
CF Adviser
 
Pelagic's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2007
Boat: Van Helleman Schooner 65ft StarGazer
Posts: 6,890
David is correct about the details, (especially about the editing). Legally it should stand scrutiny that it could not have been tampered with.
Important thing is to find a hard cover book that fits your storage and writing space, so that it is easy to use while underway. Also that fits into a zip lock bag that I keep handy.
I have been using a simple format for years.
Left side = Navigational Data Right Side = Remarks on anything you find operationally useful including Radio Log of collision avoidance conversations with other vessels.
The Day/Date/ Year are written on the Right Side so you can have many days on one page if you are at anchor. (At anchor I only log at 08:00 and 18:00 conditions or more if needed because of events)
Underway while passage making I insist on a log every hour (My book has 24 lines per page after the heading and footer)
Left side columns:
Time/Set Heading/E Compass/True Hdg /Mag Hdg/Speed Log/ COG/SOG/Wind Speed/Direction/ Sea State/RPM/Temp/Oil/Amps/ Initials.
Right Side has only3 columns : Time/Remarks/Initials
The footers have specific operational notes that keep 24 hour records and basic boat specs including air draft
I don’t know about others, but the only time I ever get to feeling a bit queasy is when I sit in front of a computer when we have some moderate motion (even on a 1100 ton super yacht with stabilizers), so I don’t think I will ever be personally logging electronically in any weather.
__________________
Pelagic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-12-2007, 00:44   #15
Moderator
 
Boracay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Pelican Bay, Great Sandy National Park
Boat: Steel Roberts Offshore 44
Posts: 5,175
Images: 18
Legal Requirement?

So what is the legal requirement for a cruising yacht when it comes to a logbook?

I have never heard of anyone being asked for one so is it possible not to have one at all?
__________________

__________________
Rust never sleeps
Boracay Blog.
Boracay is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Log Book Entries delmarrey Rules of the Road, Regulations & Red Tape 29 23-08-2011 04:20
writing a cruising book beau Boat Ownership & Making a Living 7 09-04-2007 11:53
Custom vs Factory Build Frig/Freezer Intentional Drifter Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 14 12-01-2007 17:34
New buy. Custom vs Production Efraim Monohull Sailboats 15 10-12-2006 16:11
The Weekend Navigator Book Craig Harlamoff Navigation 5 18-06-2006 20:46



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 00:09.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.