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Old 11-07-2008, 09:57   #1
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Question about the "V" style of anchoring- how to handle wind direction shifts

We had a pretty good thunderstorm cell blow through here yesterday (I was in the office looking out thinking of sailing... ) and it got me thinking about a question I have not figured out yet. The winds were primarily from one direction but towards the end did swing around to come from the opposite direction for a time. I understand the reason for the wind shift I think (low moved overhead) but an not sure how to anchor for it.

Using 2x anchors off the bow of the boat, in a V configuration, seems the easiest/logical solution for winds from one direction. How do you handle winds which shift to come from a different direction? With the V configuration I can't figure out if the boat out tangle the anchors up making a mess, if one would stay slack and the other anchor would drag/pivot/set itself in a new direction?

In general, how to you folks handle mid lat thunderstorms?
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Old 11-07-2008, 10:41   #2
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Generally as the wind changes direction one anchor will become slack. Just haul it up and reset. Many folks use a dink to set the second anchor. This is a waste of time and energy. What I do is first set one anchor paying out about twenty more feet than I need. Then I motor at 90 degrees from that anchor (set starboard anchor, motor 90 degrees to port). When the starboard anchor starts pulling the boat that way (to starboard) the angle will start closing from 90 deg. When the angle is about 60 deg, drop the port anchor, stop motoring, and, as the boat falls back, pay out your port rode. When you've dropped back far enough take up a bit on the starboard anchor so that the boat rides on both anchors.
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Old 11-07-2008, 11:59   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marty9876 View Post
We had a pretty good thunderstorm cell blow through here yesterday (I was in the office looking out thinking of sailing... ) and it got me thinking about a question I have not figured out yet. The winds were primarily from one direction but towards the end did swing around to come from the opposite direction for a time. I understand the reason for the wind shift I think (low moved overhead) but an not sure how to anchor for it.

Using 2x anchors off the bow of the boat, in a V configuration, seems the easiest/logical solution for winds from one direction. How do you handle winds which shift to come from a different direction? With the V configuration I can't figure out if the boat out tangle the anchors up making a mess, if one would stay slack and the other anchor would drag/pivot/set itself in a new direction?

In general, how to you folks handle mid lat thunderstorms?
If you are expecting wind or current to reverse, you set anchors 180 degrees apart.

This shows it, but I was taught to put a linesman loop in one rode, tie the other rode to the loop and run that out about 6-10 feet to keep the lines from hanging up on the keel. Putting knots in you line does decrease the strength of the line though.

Technique - 2 Anchors

John
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Old 11-07-2008, 12:07   #4
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Generally as the wind changes direction one anchor will become slack. Just haul it up and reset. Many folks use a dink to set the second anchor. This is a waste of time and energy. What I do is first set one anchor paying out about twenty more feet than I need. Then I motor at 90 degrees from that anchor (set starboard anchor, motor 90 degrees to port). When the starboard anchor starts pulling the boat that way (to starboard) the angle will start closing from 90 deg. When the angle is about 60 deg, drop the port anchor, stop motoring, and, as the boat falls back, pay out your port rode. When you've dropped back far enough take up a bit on the starboard anchor so that the boat rides on both anchors.
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Well explained and posred Rick
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