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Old 07-07-2008, 11:42   #1
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Question How to know you're ok to Regalvanize?

I want to re-galvanize my anchor and chain which is a bit rusty. I just bought this ground tackle in early May. It was really expensive, but they threw in the attached Pearson 424 so I had to have it. ;-)

I don't know the history of this ground tackle, whether its been re-galvanized before the make, age, etc. (I'm contacting the PO to try and find out).

Here's a pic of the chain: Anchor Rode on Flickr - Photo Sharing!

So, how do you know when you're OK to re-galvanize? A very small part of me (not the part attached to my wallet) is thinking maybe I should buy new and then know where I'm starting from.

Are there any good "rule-of-thumb" guidelines to follow?

Thanks,
-p
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Old 07-07-2008, 15:47   #2
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Look for any wear on the chain, and I would personally get rid of the very rusty chain. Can't go wrong with new, but maybe you should give back the boat they threw in on the deal???????
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Old 07-07-2008, 15:52   #3
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What is the cost savings. In some places like VE, they do a good and relatively cheap job on chain. If you are in the US, I would be surprised if there is much cost savings.

Ground tackle is muy importante.
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Old 07-07-2008, 16:16   #4
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Check the prices for regalvanising, the chain would have to be "rumbled" rolled in an 8 sided heavy steel box to remove the rust scale, (normal procedure) the anchor if a CQR type probably has lead in the tip. This melts out during the galv process and has to be replaced unless you melt it out yourself before taking it to the galvaniser. You still have to put it back in when the job is finished. I don't have a clue as to the price of quality chain in the US but regalvanising in NZ would be a 1/4 or less than the price of new (Quality)chain. Gmac may have a better idea?
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Old 07-07-2008, 21:04   #5
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The price is 55 cents a pound, they weigh it after the galvanizing. I'll price new chain too.
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Old 08-07-2008, 01:38   #6
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Howdy lads,
Firstly Steve, we have just sussed here in NZ and currently a re-galv with spinning costs about 60% of new 10mm (3/8") chain, good chain. By spinning I mean straight out of the galv bath the put it into a centrifuge and spin the excess off. It is worth spending the bucks to do that. That's chain at the old price, see further down.

Patrick - your chain doesn't look that bad from what I can see in that photo. Nice shape, nice weld zone, can't see any big wear and while I can't pick up any stamps I'd say it probably is a well made chain. Rust wise again not to bad mostly. Bit hard to see if those couple of extra rusty bits a flaking or not though. I'd say that unless those bad bits are flaky I'd check out a galvaniser for the cost to get it done. If the chain needs blasting before galving it may push the price up a bit.

I'd also allow for a test afterwards. As you mention you have no history on the chain it could be well worth it for the peace of mind. Getting it proof tested shouldn't be too hard unless you are in the middle of no where. Suss a company who does commercial crane type gear, they usually have test beds.

Here is a specific bit on regalvanising chains you may like to read. This site is in NZ so not a lot of point shopping there I'd say, the freight would be nasty. Also those are metric chains and if you are US based you'll probably have imperial sizing, it does make a difference.
Do I Regalvanise or not and what pitfalls could there be? - Chains, Ropes & Anchors :: The Maritime Bondage Specialists

The basic things to look for are wear, anymore than 10% of starting diameter will get knocked back by a survuyor on a commercial boat. Check where the 2 links meet each other, that's the highest wear zone. Recreational don't have any rules I know of, here at least, but if it's getting close to 20% I'd be a bit nervous personally.

Flaky rust. Usually means the chain will need bead or sand blasting before re-galv and in blasting can often take the diameter down more than you expect.

If the chain has already been re-galved a couple of times I'd be nervous or at least make sure it is proof loaded afterwards.

Whatever you do move fast. The price of Zinc is going up like a rocket and the price of steel even faster. 2 big manufactures we deal have both said their raw material costs have gone up over 40% in the last 2 months. So any new supplies of chain will be going up in price a lot and shortly.

Hope that helps. Ask any questions you may or I've forgotten, I'm good like that.
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Old 08-07-2008, 02:07   #7
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According to the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety, Make a link-by-link inspection and discard if:
- Wear exceeds 15% of a link diameter.
- Cut, nicked, cracked, gouged, burned, or
- Corrosion pitted. (Surface rust can be removed)
- Distorted, twisted, or bent.
- Stretched. (Links tend to close up and get longer)
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Old 08-07-2008, 03:15   #8
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Fully agree with that Gord. Actually nice simple guidelines.
Obviously not out of the NZ Government, the hopeless bunch of ........ They would make it 400 pages long.
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Old 08-07-2008, 04:31   #9
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Great advice as usual. May I also suggest that, you may wish to keep any long good section (if you do go new) and add it as a leader to a nylon rode as an extra back up.
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Old 08-07-2008, 04:45   #10
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Thanks for the update on NZ prices Grant, I new things were going up but hadn't realized how much, although if the new chain prices go up as much as you say the differential will come down again.
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Old 09-07-2008, 00:41   #11
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Yeap anything with a big steel content is about to go through the roof.

Too many suits sitting in ivory towers shouting 'Buy Buy Sell Sell' rather than being productive members of society.

So anyone after anything steel, shop hard now.
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