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Old 19-03-2009, 06:02   #16
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Sometimes I believe that the harbor has something to do with corroding the chain. We anchored for 3 weeks in Luperon and chain was never the same again.
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Old 19-03-2009, 06:10   #17
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Dick I think thats part of it- Last year I was anchored for a few months inside of a Volcano and I think its a bit more corrsive- although my "Gav" was mostly gone already- Im going to try and have it reGalv in Tunisia ANYONE Know where in Tunisa I can have it done?
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Old 26-03-2009, 18:27   #18
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I bought new 3/8 chain and cruised full time for 4 years and it looked new after all that use.
Oh, yeah, it was stainless steel
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Old 26-03-2009, 18:49   #19
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Oh, yeah, it was stainless steel
Aside from the high cost you need to understand that the welds in SS chain won't last as long as the chain will. Welds fail far sooner than the links which means the chain fails sooner than you think. The best thing about SS chain is it looks really great if you don't use it much. The welds fail long before you can see the chain looking poorly.

Looks of the chain is not always a the best indicator.
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Old 26-03-2009, 20:24   #20
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The welds fail long before you can see the chain looking poorly.

Looks of the chain is not always a the best indicator.
And one must always remember "O'Reilly's Law": "Murphy was an optimist".

Your chain will fail at the least opportune time, and you will lose your anchor to boot.
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Old 27-03-2009, 03:59   #21
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And one must always remember "O'Reilly's Law": "Murphy was an optimist".

Your chain will fail at the least opportune time, and you will lose your anchor to boot.

Not to mention the Yacht and maybe all on board!
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Old 27-03-2009, 08:33   #22
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In 1994 we purchased 400 feet of 3/8 inch high test chain at West Marine, and then we proceeded to anchor a bazillion places around the world. We are still using the same chain, and it's still in good shape. We had it regalvanized in New Zealand and Australia, and before we set sail on another cruise, we will regalvanize once again.

If you paint the chain, you may not be able to regalvanize. The Australian galvanizers would not accept chains or anchors that had been painted.
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Old 30-03-2009, 06:39   #23
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Aside from the high cost you need to understand that the welds in SS chain won't last as long as the chain will. Welds fail far sooner than the links which means the chain fails sooner than you think. The best thing about SS chain is it looks really great if you don't use it much. The welds fail long before you can see the chain looking poorly.

Looks of the chain is not always a the best indicator.
As with many things all stainless steel is not the same. I'm not sure what alloy stainless steel my chain is, but after 4 years of cruising full time with it, and having been in the water at least 1200 days (salt water) it looks new, bright and shinny. I have seen other ss chain that looks far different.
I went for 3/8" chain, when 5/16 would have worked.
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Old 30-03-2009, 07:20   #24
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The first few feet of chain appear to still have galv coating. Which cause me to think that the problem is not from sitting on the bottom, but rather fron sitting in the locker wet.

Now I'm going to open a can of worms.

I don't a hatch to have access to my anchor locker from the deck. I have a hawser on deck, an access door in the V-berth and a drain hole to the bilge.

Several weeks ago I was considering making the major modification to modernize the boat and build a "better" anhor locker. I walked the docks and spoke with dockmates as I was stealing ideas. One thing that jumped out at me was the mention of taking on water in the anchor locker thru that drain hole and the hatch as the bow was burried in waves.

Then I noticed that one neighbors modern boat also did not have the hatch and subsequent drain hole to the outside. This was an Island Packet, which in IMO is a quality, well thought out boat.

The point is, the problem could be aggravated by the anchor locker design. Seawater flushing in and out while the boat is underway, and then not getting a fresh water rinse afterwards.

It is a sad fact that most boats are designed to sell more than they are designed to sail. The modern anchor locker is great for access to the chain, but maybe not so good for the chain itself.

I remain happy with my anchor locker as it is. Sorry I don't have a picture of my years old chain. But it looks better than that.
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Old 30-03-2009, 07:36   #25
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When I first purchased my boat, my chain looked somewhat like the chain in the picture, except it was far worse. At the bitter end portion of the chain, it was one fused, rusted mess. I spent a little bit thinking about the causes and after thinking a bit about the issues, I concluded that much of the problem was in storing the chain with it still being wet with salt water.

After I repurchasing the chain (ACCO 5/16 HT) and using it for several year so far (4 years) there has not been that much degredation of the chain. But, when ever I am not using it and whenever I have an opportunity, I make sure I wash it down extensively.

I expect to get about 10 years out of the chain. I don't expect to regalvanize, just replace when it get's to the point there is detectable errosion.. I do regular inspections and so far no issues.
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Old 30-03-2009, 07:49   #26
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I think I am on my second length of 200 feet of chain in about 18 years. I end for ended the first one then renewed and now I think I have end for ended this one which has more time in it. We don't live aboard but anchor almost ever weekend from may - sept. Some of that use was 4 yrs of live aboard cruising in the caribe. My guess is that the chain is good for 8-10 years of moderate/normal use.
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Old 31-03-2009, 11:57   #27
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Chain maintenance has a lot to do with chain longevity. If at all possible, a light fresh water rinse does wonders to lengthen the life of a chain.
Always, always...stay away from Chinese chain. Cruisers trying to save a few bucks have found inferior welds, inadequate galvanizing and poor dimensions of the chain links.
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Old 31-03-2009, 16:16   #28
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I am adding a fresh water outlet near our chain-locker to make it easy to rinse it after use. It will make a big difference!

About chain qualities: the Italian stainless chain (is that from Wasi ?) is very good. For galvanized chains, I see that European 10mm lasts much longer than Acco 3/8". I think the European chain is better quality? I've never seen a chinese chain that works on a windlass. But I know all rigging wire is now made in Korea, even that from Navtec and the expensive Scandinavian brands!

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Old 31-03-2009, 18:36   #29
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But I know all rigging wire is now made in Korea, even that from Navtec and the expensive Scandinavian brands!

cheers,
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Now there's a scary thought!
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Old 04-04-2009, 20:03   #30
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We had it regalvanized in New Zealand and Australia, and before we set sail on another cruise, we will regalvanize once again.
But then get it proof loaded just to make sure the strength lose isn't more than expected as galvanising it 4 times without checking is taking a big risk. I'm sure you forgot to mention that bit Maxing

Galvanising will last shorter and short times frames sorry folks. The bureaucrats have been at it and are making the galvanisers take bits out of the mix for assorted reasons. One reason we were told the aluminium was taken out in the US 1st and nearly most of the EU now is, the fish were getting alzhimers. Strangely that is so far into weird it may actually be true, who knows.

The lose of the aluminium now means we are getting thinner layes for galv but better self-healing capibilities. We still think the galv with alloy in it does have the edge in longevity.

How long will chain last will vary with the bottom types anchored in, how well it's stored and how often it's used.

Coral can strip galvanising off in 3 months, Ouch. A lot of galvanising just rubs off and there's not much you can do about that really. Storing in wet lockers isn't good, open the hatch and dry the locker out whenever you can. Washing the chain is all good, saltwater is OK but fresh a lot better. If you have a length that doesn't get used often maybe spray some fogging oil or something similar on it for a little extra protection from the saltwater pouring over it, best done when the chain is dry. A good silicone spray is not bad either. Seen some good results by people using Scotchguard of all things. Just something to form a bit of a water repellent layer will help a lot.

Don't confuse High Test (what is commonly called HT in the US) with high tensile. US HT is a Grade 40 so easy to galvanise if the bloke doing it knows his game. Real high tensile (a G70 generally) is the one that is virtually impossible to regalv. The G40 is only a high tensile mild steel, it's quite different to a high tensile alloy steel.

I doubt very very much the quality of the US made chains and the EU made chains are much different. We've never seen anything to suggest both aren't pretty much equal apart from the physical sizing and marketing angles. By marketing I mean the US calling a G40 High Test where the rest of the world just calls it a G40.

Looked after 10 years should be easily doable. Maybe a bit less if full time cruising.
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