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Old 27-06-2017, 06:22   #16
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

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Originally Posted by Tetepare View Post
"(c) this guy won't even send me a picture or give me a phone number so I can fix the problem or determine what to do and finally (d) he refuses to pull in a bit of scope if I'm too close to his buoy which would take him all of 15 minutes"



Oh boo hoo. He doesn't owe you anything. Did you offer to PAY him to care for your boat? And why would he board your boat and change your anchoring setup, which then makes him responsible? Sounds like entitlement to me.
I'm not saying he owes me anything. If he says I'm too close to a park buoy and the only alternative is to spend 4+ hours and miss a day or two of work due to ferry schedules, or have them tow the boat 100Kms and impound it, I'd be more than happy to give him a case of beer for 15-20 minutes of his time. When weidling such a heavy stick, all I was trying to do was find a mutually beneficial solution.
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Old 27-06-2017, 06:27   #17
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

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What I find fishy about this situation is the notion that someone is messing with your boat. You should give people more credit than to think the worst of them automatically.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
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Being threatened with having my boat towed 100Kms all the way to Victoria comes across to me is pretty weird when there's a government harbour less than 5 Km across the pond.
Fishy is the second one. How can you be sure this is really a park guy? Doesn't your phone show who called you?

This sounds highly suspicious.

Makes the whole long sob story sound very, very "off."

I live on Vanouver Island. I agree, there is no bloody way anyone would tow your boat across the Strait of Georgia. Heck, there are people who are afraid to sail across!!!

Sounds fishy to me, too.

Good luck. I forget your earlier post that Vasco noted, but it certainlycould be your issue, not theirs.
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Old 27-06-2017, 06:40   #18
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

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mr-canada,

Based on the fact that the anchor consistently held over an extended period of time on several occasions, during which there were certainly wind shifts, I think you are right to find it odd that there was only an issue when the boat was left unattended.

This fact negates the comment that the anchor was at fault.

As a side note, since no anchor will dependably reset 100% of the time during wind or tidal shifts, we recommend setting two anchors if at all possible.
This is what I'm thinking. After setting the hook (properly) full bore in reverse, letting out a lot of scope (up to 7:1), with no considerable winds and no swells as it's a coastal area, spending up to 3-4 nights on the boat on the same set, then I leave and in hours it's fouled, dragging, and I'm getting threats over the phone of having the boat towed and impounded - just when I am least able to do much of anything about it or check on it in a hurry - seems fishy to me.

I'm checking the weather multiple times a day, winds haven't exceeded 9 kts in a gust (if you'd call that a gust, this anchor has held in 25+ kts), at night winds die down and are slack. If the Fortress was that bad of an anchor in this holding I would have woken up probably wondering where the heck I was at least a couple times by now.

It's more common in this area than people think to have your anchor intentionally fouled. When there are wait lists lasting years at most marinas, moorage is ridiculously expensive, and even a three bedroom rancher way way outside of the city is going for a million and a half dollars, it doesn't take much for some jerk with more money than brains to take matters into their own hands and foul your anchor because they are paying through the nose and you're not.

It happened in False Creek- during a blow a guy went out and literally cut everyone's anchor lines, clean cut - then went around "rescuing" people's boats and trying to yard them for a thousand bucks each. It happened to the park operator guy in Squamish, the tow guy cut his anchor line, and called him to tell him his boat was beached and tried to charge him an arm and a leg to drag it back to deep water; when he realized it was a clean cut line he found a different person to help him.

I'm sure if it's happened in multiple places its not unlikely to have it happen again, especially with the NIMBYism that is rampant in this area, people think when they buy a house with a water view, they own the view and the water when that's absolutely not the case.

It's a bit interesting that RIVTOW has kept coming up by the park operator each time my anchor has been fouled - calling RIVTOW is like a $400 experience to start and it only goes up from there. Of course the fouling is only happening the moment I'm gone and unable to just deal with the problem myself. God only knows what they would charge if someone towed my boat over 100 kms from Gibsons to Victoria, it would easily reach the thousands because they would not only use fuel to get the boat there, but the fuel to get the boat back - and even odder that there's a government wharf 10 minutes away that can take an emergency moor on a short term basis (ie. days).

I think I'm going to take a few days off work, have the harbour ferry guy just stop by my boat and pretend to pick me up, preferably during a rainy weekend, and just have a look see if anyone screws with my anchor. Anchors foul, it's part of life on the water, but this is now three for three that when I leave the boat there is suddenly some weird problem in under 24 h when I was safely at anchor, in light to no weather sometimes for multiple days and then these critical problems appear the moment I'm gone.

As I said I talked to a local and he said there's a group of about 4 complete jerks in this bay who own vacation properties who are in cahoots with eachother. Maybe next time it's their boat that gets sunk.
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Old 27-06-2017, 07:00   #19
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

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Fishy is the second one. How can you be sure this is really a park guy? Doesn't your phone show who called you?

This sounds highly suspicious.

Makes the whole long sob story sound very, very "off."

I live on Vanouver Island. I agree, there is no bloody way anyone would tow your boat across the Strait of Georgia. Heck, there are people who are afraid to sail across!!!

Sounds fishy to me, too.

Good luck. I forget your earlier post that Vasco noted, but it certainlycould be your issue, not theirs.
Totally. Towing a 7 ton sailboat across the Straight of Georgia simply because it was too close to a park buoy seems like trying to kill a mouse with ten sticks of dynamite.

If it was dragging of it's own accord simply either towing it a few feet to the park buoy or dock and ordering me to deal with it or across the pond to Gibsons 10-15 minutes away would make more sense than taking a boat of unknown (to them) seaworthiness 100Kms across the Straight of Georgia in god knows what conditions out in that kind of open water. Toss in any liability issues to do with what would happen to a 7 ton boat in big waves under tow and the Canada Shipping Act without a court order and it borders on insanity.

As for the phone number thing, I found that extremely weird too. It's one thing for a guy not to want to give me a personal phone number because he doesn't want to be riddled with looking after people's boats, but it's another thing when he's issuing me 24-48h notice to remove the boat from the area (not the park - the area) else it will be towed to Victoria. That's a pretty serious matter of the gravest of importance.

I don't even think that seizing a boat and towing it that far is legal by any regard. I have been looking up the maritime laws and apparently, even if the boat is derelict (which mine is certainly not), you can't even remove the thing if it's beached without going through a huge long process. The only way to get a boat removed super quick is in the case of a fuel spill (something not possible as I have an outboard, sealed gas can locked in a locker, disconnected from the motor), normally the process can take years. They are talking 24-48h.

The whole thing sounds fishy to me. Sometimes people just get their facts a bit wrong, but this is adding up.

1) I had a call that I was 15 feet from a park buoy. I had a guy go look at it and he said I was 60-80 feet from the buoy which is where I left it
2) I call the supervisor about this towing to Victoria stuff and lack of a phone number and I get a song and dance
3) My boat was now apparently dragging and moored to a park buoy by a "private citizen", the buoy was unsafe due to a divers' failed inspection and now the boat had to be moved in 24h
4) The only instance where my anchor has allegedly dragged has been after I left the boat, it was solid every time I left it
5) This towing 100Kms to Victoria thing seems way beyond excessive
6) Every call I get I'm suggested to contact RIVTOW, when the own guy's whaler could easily get the job done in under 20
7) The guy refuses to even pull in 20 feet of scope, refuses to touch a line (btw, how would he move it if he wont touch it)
8) There are mooring buoys as part of the park plus a dock if the boat was clearly in distress, as well as private docks throughout the bay

This is all just adding up to me that something fishy is going on here. Things screw up, anchors foul, people might not know the rules. Sh*t happens. But not this much at once in such a short amount of time.
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Old 27-06-2017, 09:01   #20
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

Have you considered paying someone to watch your boat, even the harbor master?

Maybe that's what they want, and why they're screwing with you, if they are. But, either way, getting someone local couldn't hurt, and save you the headache of 8 hrs round trip.

You'd be paying if you had a slip. I hope it isn't nefarious, but even if it is, you've got a few choices and decisions to make.
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Old 27-06-2017, 09:41   #21
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

I have to start by saying that I think it is unreasonable to expect a park employee to board your boat and adjust your anchor rode for you. Certainly not his job, and not a responsibility that I would want to take on if I were him.

Other than that, I have to agree that it is quite odd the your anchor always fouls only hours after you have left the boat. I would be inclined to take one of the solutions already offered:
1. some sort of monitoring system
2. hire someone to keep an eye on it
3. hide aboard and see if you can catch someone

Good luck, however it turns out.
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Old 27-06-2017, 10:07   #22
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

The OP does need a reality check. There's no way to tell what the problem is without doing one.

Offhand...Buy a 50# Mantus and replace the Dantoy. Go home and see what happens. (IF you can lift an anchor without injury, it's too light, no matter what it is.)

Or, put an unemployed friend belowdeck (no lights on at night!) to keep an eye on things for a week.

Or, put an infrared game camera, or two, on deck, as inconspicuous as possible. Check 'em out when you are called back up.

Or, look into one of the live webcam systems, if you can get cellular data up there. Some will only alert you if they see motion, i.e. someone on the deck.

There's a range of choices. A Ridiculously Big New Anchor might actually be the cheapest and fastest way to do it.

But without some kind of reality check? (And paranoia check too, yes.) I don't think there's any anchor that is 100% trustworthy, except a helical screwed into the bottom. PITA that folks up there aren't more helpful, but at least they DID call.
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Old 27-06-2017, 16:51   #23
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

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Originally Posted by Fortress View Post
mr-canada,

Based on the fact that the anchor consistently held over an extended period of time on several occasions, during which there were certainly wind shifts, I think you are right to find it odd that there was only an issue when the boat was left unattended.

This fact negates the comment that the anchor was at fault.

As a side note, since no anchor will dependably reset 100% of the time during wind or tidal shifts, we recommend setting two anchors if at all possible.
Just to be clear, I did not say the anchor was at fault. The anchoring with an improper anchor for the conditions was most likely at fault. I really like my 2 Fortress' I have onboard - for the uses I put them to. They have some of the greatest holding power per weight anywhere.

That said, a single Danforth style anchor is inappropriate for unattended anchoring in switching tidal currents. It is a recipe for disaster.

Good tool, you just have to use it correctly. It makes no difference if you watch it for 6 hours or 2 days, it is still not appropriate for unattended anchoring.
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Old 27-06-2017, 17:31   #24
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

Why anchor in a place where some Canadian twat can hassle you, move on.
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Old 27-06-2017, 18:30   #25
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

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Just to be clear, I did not say the anchor was at fault. The anchoring with an improper anchor for the conditions was most likely at fault. I really like my 2 Fortress' I have onboard - for the uses I put them to. They have some of the greatest holding power per weight anywhere.



That said, a single Danforth style anchor is inappropriate for unattended anchoring in switching tidal currents. It is a recipe for disaster.



Good tool, you just have to use it correctly. It makes no difference if you watch it for 6 hours or 2 days, it is still not appropriate for unattended anchoring.

I don't believe that a properly-sized and well-set Fortress anchor is any more likely to break free from a wind or tidal shift than other anchors.

I also don't believe that other anchors have the precision-machined sharpness and large surface area of Fortress, which results in an incredible, unmatched deep-burying capability.

And so the most common complaint about the Fortress after a heavy blow or after it has been buried into a sea bottom for an extended period of time is retrieving it.

As an example, awhile back we were contacted by a US Coast Guard station in the Gulf of Mexico. They had hung on their primary 47 pound Fortress FX-85 model aboard their 87 foot / 91 metric ton patrol boat for three days since the seas were too rough to go out on their patrols.

When it came time to recover the anchor, they couldn't break it free and so they had to cut the line and they called us to buy another anchor.

Of course, we have heard many, many more stories from boaters during the past 30 years in our local hurricane region who left their boats unattended prior to some horrific storm conditions and they were delighted to come back and find their boat still in the same location, thanks to their Fortress.

Safe anchoring,
Brian
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Old 27-06-2017, 18:34   #26
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

I had a friendly fellow move the boat to his private buoy, bless his soul, so I didn't blow a day and a half and over a hundred bucks just to reset the anchor.. again... and again. It's not a permanent mooring for me but it gives me at least until I swap the short leg loaner off and get the long leg mounted and tested to figure something out, he says he might be able to help me get something.

He is a longtime boater from the area, been on boats his whole life. Says the residents there are really cliquey and are known to cause problems. He parked a bigger boat there once and came up on deck to see multiple boats swirling around his boat inspecting it. He had some choice words for them along the lines of "if you ever touch my boat I'm gonna" - I'll leave the rest to your imagination.

When he came to tow my boat away, a few boats had a few too many questions for him, he noted.

While a few posters have made comment about the park operator, this is a marine park and the operator is issued a Boston Whaler as part of his job. While it's not his job to look after other people's boats, if he was complaining that I was a hazard to park users, too close to a buoy, and threatening to have my boat towed 100kms away 10-20 minutes of his time isn't too much to ask. I have used the park multiple times, both the dock and bought firewood, so it's not like I am stingy (they charge ten bucks for an hour's worth of firewood). I'm only allowed two weeks mooring a year on the buoy and at the dock, so it's not the money. I even offered if he popped it on a buoy that was secure, I'd pay for the night(s) I needed it there - that's not asking a favor, that's a business transaction.

That said I really doubt the guy is the one playing with my anchor. I think it's some of the cliquey local residents.

All of this:
1) the threat to tow the boat 100kms
2) the lack of a picture of me being too close to the buoy
3) the ever increasing frequency of these "foulings"
4) the history given to me by a local longtime boater

Makes me think:
Someone is fouling my anchor to get me out of there.

I did some thinking today now that the problem is (at least temporarily) solved.

First time I dropped anchor, it set so well it was set by the current. I hoisted it back up and changed spots to be further from shore, again, it set perfectly mostly due to the current. I was present for about 5 tides to monitor the swing, and I was far from the rocks (they are marked by a buoy) and far from a local's dock; about 80 feet from each.

The anchor held a full week without problems. The twisting problem as has been noted earlier in this thread with the Danforth was even present, but it was holding like a rock until I got back the following weekend.

After some motoring around for a day, I reset the anchor, even further from the rocks and shoreline this time. It again set perfectly, could handle full throttle in reverse. Present on the boat for 3 or 4 tides. Within 24 hours I got a few calls that the boat was drifting dangerously close to the rocks. It was a record low tide; but tides don't change that much on the low. A friendly boater shot me a picture, the keel was right beside the rock. By the time I got there, higher water had me very far from the rocks. The anchor held strong, but I was weirded out by how close to the rocks I got. I chalked it up to the low tide increasing the scope.

After some more motoring and an overnight stop at the marina, I set the anchor again, this time in the centre of the channel, at low tide so I could accurately have proper scope. Even further from the shore, these park mooring buoys, the rocks, everything. Current was pulling me towards the buoys and I had significant room. Stayed there for 3 or 4 tides, making sure the anchor wasn't fouled and holding well. Got a call two days later that my boat was dangerously close to the mooring bouys of the park. This was the picture I was requesting, when I was getting the threats to have my boat towed 100kms to Victoria. Had this friendly fellow who is helping me now pop by and pull in some rode because the park operator didn't want anything to do with it. He pulled in 20 feet even though he reported I was 60-80 feet from the buoy.

Next I got a call from the park operator that the boat was adrift about four hours later, and that someone in a small boat tied me off to a buoy that didn't pass a divers examination, and that I now had 24 hours or less to move the boat or it would be towed to Victoria.

There was barely any wind, no storms (not even rain) throughout this whole time.

Upon reexamining the pictures sent to me by the friendly fellow I noticed a few things:

1) When I was "too close to the buoy" the photo revealed that I was so far from the buoy that it wasn't even in the picture, and this is before he pulled up 20 feet of rode.

2) When the small boat tied me off to that park buoy that didn't pass it's divers' test, I noticed that the anchor rode was vertical. When I left the boat, about 600 feet away (with it pointing in the same direction towards where I had originally dropped the anchor) the rode was at a 7:1 scope at low tide and was at just shy of a 50 degree angle.

In the case of #2 I just can't see an anchor dragging for 600 feet, even if it didn't reset itself, with the rode going from 50 degrees to 90. Theres quite a bit of chain and no anchor recovery float on it.

My guess is someone was zipping out in a boat early in the morning knowing I was gone, pulled up the anchor and then just dropped it in a heap, likely to make me think that the holding was bad so I'd no longer be in their view.

Lets just say I hope I can find a better mooring situation through this guy. It costs me a pretty penny to get to and from the boat at this place, plus if I'm missing work that's even more. I hate to see a jerk like this get his way but having my boat end up floating around adrift is even worse. I'll just report this hazard to navigation to the Coast Guard in case it happens to someone else.

On the forced towing and 24/48 hour notice thing, anyone know the effective rules for coastal waters in BC when it comes to seizing a vessel, either at anchor or anyplace else? As far as I know it can take years to get permission unless there is a pollutant being released. I've read a bunch of the laws and papers online dealing with the removal of derelict vessels, but a synopsis from an experienced seaman would be helpful in case I ever get into a similar situation again. As I previously stated, NIMBYism is pretty rampant here due to property values being some of the most expensive in the world.
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Old 27-06-2017, 18:39   #27
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

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I don't believe that a properly-sized and well-set Fortress anchor is any more likely to break free from wind or tidal shift than other anchors.
...
And so the most common complaint about the Fortress after a heavy blow or after it has been buried into a sea bottom for an extended period of time is retrieving it.

As an example, awhile back we were contacted by a US Coast Guard station in the Gulf of Mexico. They had hung on their primary 47 pound Fortress FX-85 model aboard their 87 foot / 91 metric ton patrol boat for three days since the seas were too rough to go out on their patrols.

When it came time to recover the anchor, they couldn't break it free and so they had to cut the line and they called us to buy another anchor.

Of course, we have heard many, many more stories from boaters during the past 30 years in our local hurricane region who left their boats unattended prior to some horrific storm conditions and they were delighted to come back and find their boat still there, thanks to their Fortress.
All I can say is... wow. A 47 pound anchor holding a 91 metric ton boat in seas too rough for that size of boat is pretty impressive.

I have found the same problem too. The thing sets like a dream with great holding power and the biggest problem is actually getting it out of it's set.

I know the previous owner swore by this anchor, he was a CYA Instructor and lived aboard at various periods, boated his whole life and was on the Police Marine squad here.

From what I've read, the main problems with Danforths is getting a bad set in weeds and it's inability to set on rocky bottoms (which is a problem with most anchors).
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Old 27-06-2017, 18:48   #28
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

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Originally Posted by Fortress View Post
I don't believe that a properly-sized and well-set Fortress anchor is any more likely to break free from a wind or tidal shift than other anchors.

I also don't believe that other anchors have the precision-machined sharpness and large surface area of Fortress, which results in an incredible, unmatched deep-burying capability.

And so the most common complaint about the Fortress after a heavy blow or after it has been buried into a sea bottom for an extended period of time is retrieving it.

As an example, awhile back we were contacted by a US Coast Guard station in the Gulf of Mexico. They had hung on their primary 47 pound Fortress FX-85 model aboard their 87 foot / 91 metric ton patrol boat for three days since the seas were too rough to go out on their patrols.

When it came time to recover the anchor, they couldn't break it free and so they had to cut the line and they called us to buy another anchor.

Of course, we have heard many, many more stories from boaters during the past 30 years in our local hurricane region who left their boats unattended prior to some horrific storm conditions and they were delighted to come back and find their boat still in the same location, thanks to their Fortress.

Safe anchoring,
Brian
Your example of the tenacious holding power of a Fortress' is not relevant to this discussion. This is a case where even high holding is necessarily required. It just needs to hold the boat in reversing conditions reliably with no one there to watch it. Danforth style anchors are not held in high regard as to their ability to consistently reset when tidal currents and/or winds cause a reversing of pull. I have no issue with attended anchoring in these conditions with a single Danforth style anchor. For unattended you need a Bahaimian Moor. This was a very common way to anchor a boat in the days of using Danforth as primary anchors. And yes, other anchor styles do reset more reliably than a Fortress. They just won't have the other advantages of a Fortress' like light weight and high holding to weight/size power.
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Old 27-06-2017, 22:44   #29
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

First of all, in today's litiguous culture, NOBODY who doesn't know you quite well is going to board your boat at anchor and fiddle with things. It is simply too much to expect. If a good sam comes along and remedies a disaster in the making without worrying about liability and stuff, it is a rare and special blessing. But don't expect it.

Lots of good advice given in the above posts. One thing I would add, is consult a lawyer and get the lowdown on the park's authority to have you towed, and how long and involved the process, and what recourse you have. Also, a rundown on use of deadly force laws, and how they apply to your situation.

So, get another anchor. A good one, that resets well, with plenty of weight. Speaking of weight, consider chain rode. Especially since your boat is semi permanently anchored unattended. Ideally, the chain holds the boat, and the anchor holds the chain. Use your Danforth for a stern anchor. Lets just eliminate the possibility that your anchor is mysteriously failing when you aren't looking, shall we? It is possible, after all.

Take a week off from work. Hide on the boat. Gun? I don't know how Canadian law is on such things, but even in "gun crazy" Louisiana, it is a very good idea to avoid shooting, if possible, even if it means letting the bad guy get away clean. Your best weapon would be a camera or two. Game trail cams are good but a go pro or a nice smart phone camera can be aimed. Flourescent pepper spray would be nice, if your laws allow its use. Spray paint to mark the perp might be a good idea. So he sues you for ruining his shirt. Big deal. Whatever. Anyway you need to prove someone was on your boat and then take him to court. Sure, if he is loaded he can make bail, hire the best lawyer, get off with a fine, but still it is an inconvenience to have to show up in court and get in the public record. Oh, don't use fog type pepper spray on a boat. It will get you, too. Use the type that shoots a solid stream. He might think his way out is to grab your camera, maybe put a few knots on your head in the process. This is a non lethal force situation, more than a grab the gun situation, IMHO. YMMV. Properly peppersprayed, you should be able to handle him. Duct tape is your friend. Handcuffs are even better. Zip ties not so bad if they are big strong ones. (check with your lawyer about the use of such restraints.) Get topside as soon as possible in case there is an accomplice so you can get his pic, too. Delivering a gratuitous and very solid pounding is immensely satisfying, but (am I repeating myself all over again?) check with your lawyer beforehand.

Hiring someone to watch your boat is a fine idea. Let him live aboard, too. But a stakeout with a camera is probably your best option. Don't shoot unless your life is in danger. Don't even threaten with a gun unless your life is in danger. If your life is danger, yeah, shoot. Repeat as necessary. Better to live in jail than die young on your boat. But I am thinking your assumed perpetrators are not really the deadly type, and a firearm might just complicate things for you. Be sure you have proper no tresspassing signs posted. Ask your lawyer, if you don't know why.

A friend or relative to assist with your stakeout would be a good idea. Utter silence will be required, though. No talking.
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Old 27-06-2017, 23:15   #30
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Re: Fishy anchoring situation

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First of all, in today's litiguous culture, NOBODY who doesn't know you quite well is going to board your boat at anchor and fiddle with things. It is simply too much to expect. If a good sam comes along and remedies a disaster in the making without worrying about liability and stuff, it is a rare and special blessing.
Im thinking that this sort of thing happens frequently and the park operator specifically mentioned liability if he touches the rode, and doesn't want to be the last known person who touched the rode if someone comes along and fouls the anchor to chase away boats.

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One thing I would add, is consult a lawyer and get the lowdown on the park's authority to have you towed, and how long and involved the process, and what recourse you have.
Yeah, I'm trying to look into that. 24/48 hour notice seems a bit extreme; the 100km tow threat is beyond beleivable. Our laws are probably pretty similar to the US. I've contacted the park authority and the Coast Guard and this guy's supervisor about this issue. The supervisor didn't mention anything about 24/48 hour notice and he didn't mention anything about towing the boat 100km across the Straight.

I've been doing my digging. From what I can tell so far is the following:
- Mariners must do their best to assist a vessel in distress if it will not put them in any danger
- Anchoring is part of the Right to Navigation, provided that it is for a reasonable time and on reasonable grounds, that the boat can move under it's own power under motor or sail
- Seizure of a boat requires permission from an office that handles wrecks
- A boat may be immediately towed if it is leaking pollutants.

Can't find anything specific to marine parks, I have an inquiry in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrowleyMonster View Post
So, get another anchor. A good one, that resets well, with plenty of weight. Speaking of weight, consider chain rode. Especially since your boat is semi permanently anchored unattended. Ideally, the chain holds the boat, and the anchor holds the chain. Use your Danforth for a stern anchor. Lets just eliminate the possibility that your anchor is mysteriously failing when you aren't looking, shall we? It is possible, after all.
I do have quite a bit of chain, but it's not all chain, in that depth it was about 20-40% depending on the scope. While it's possible that the anchor was mysteriously failing and it would be nice to rule that out, there is a simple law of physics that gives me high confidence that someone messed with the anchor. Even if the anchor failed, and the boat drifted 600 feet backwards, the anchor would still have some friction as it bounced along the bottom especially with the chain. I left with the anchor rode pushing out from the boat. If it drifted backwards to where it was found, I can't see any way that the anchor would be coming off the boat straight down; even bouncing along the bottom it would be payed way out in front of the boat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrowleyMonster View Post
Spray paint to mark the perp might be a good idea. So he sues you for ruining his shirt. Big deal. Whatever. Anyway you need to prove someone was on your boat and then take him to court. Sure, if he is loaded he can make bail, hire the best lawyer, get off with a fine, but still it is an inconvenience to have to show up in court and get in the public record.
Paintball gun that shoots 30 rounds a second would do the trick. BB gun to the balls would work too, without killing anyone. I have both.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrowleyMonster View Post
A friend or relative to assist with your stakeout would be a good idea. Utter silence will be required, though. No talking.
Yes definitely. I'm on a mooring buoy temporarily, thank god for this nice guy who helped me out, quite a distance from this place, and he might be able to connect me with moorage in a small marina with limited services.

I have a bunch of crap to do and money to make to pay for all this stuff (life has been really kicking me in the pants lately) but on a week with mellower weather I might do the stakeout thing, it is just too hot to seal up the boat and hide inside. Whoever this is, they tend to do their dirty work on a Monday or Tuesday morning, which is why I am suspecting one of the upland property owners (although nobody specific). The park operator, once the weekend is over, has a very slow park; the guy didn't even collect money for my moorage because he was gone from the park all night Wednesday night into Thursday morning.

I also suspect early morning because there is a bunch of transient traffic that stops in to walk a dog, use a pit toilet, or take a break at the dock even during the week days.

Probably some grumpy old retired guy choked that he sees my boat when he looks out the window and with the wife and family gone has nothing better to do than be a jerk.
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