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Old 13-03-2007, 08:02   #1
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Another CQR Question

Hello folks,

I haven't been very active on here, but have a pesky quesiton that I'm hoping someone can answer.

After all the discussion about CQR regalvanizing, I still am left without an answer (especially since the manufacturer didn't respond).

Does anyone know how to tell if a given CQR is one of the ones with lead in the tip? I have heard nothing but conflicting stories about this.

I have removed the anchor and tried scratching the underside of the tip with a nail to see if I could scratch any malleable lead out. Nothing. It appears as hard as the rest of the anchor.

Also, how is the lead put in there? Is it inside a steel cavity? Is that why I haven't been able to dig any out with a nail?

Lastly... If all else fails and I can't find a way to determine if there is lead in my tip or not, has anyone ever tried putting a zinc annode on their anchor to hold corrosion down?

I was thinking if I can't hot dip galvanize it, I would try to affix a zinc to the chain and a zinc to the bar that holds the flukes apart, or possibly to the shank, so as to avoid messing with any part of the anchor that buries deep.

Any suggestions? I have about 2 weeks of time before we leave the dock and start up the charter business again. I am trying to determine what to do with the anchor since we will be living on it 24/7 starting in a couple weeks.

Thanks, guys!
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Old 13-03-2007, 08:21   #2
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One method

As a physicist you'll like this method: Weigh the anchor; put it in water and measure the amount displaced in cubic feet. The density of forged steel is close to that of wrought iron which is 485 pounds per cubic feet while that of lead is 710 pounds per cubic feet.

If there is a significant amount of lead you will find a significantly higher density than 485 or else it would't be worth the effort and expense to manufacture it that way.
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Old 13-03-2007, 12:37   #3
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CQR= lead in the tip. It is poured into the welded void space in the tip. Need to drill a hole and melt it out. As I suggested before, how about zinc arc spray? A lot more durable and doesn't require removing the lead. The zinc process mitigates the need for an anode.
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Old 13-03-2007, 14:50   #4
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Sean

We had our regalvanized a couple of yrs ago, did not have any problem when they did it. The guy I took mine too does them fairly frequently and did not even think about it being an issue.

BTW look for us this summer we should be in LI Sound for the month of June before we head up to Maine. Plan right now is to head up sometime after May 15 depending on weather. The earlier the spring the earlier we'll head north.
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Old 13-03-2007, 16:03   #5
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Thanks, all! Pwederell, I had forgotten/missed your original suggestion. I think that might be the best route, as I don't have the resources aboard a boat to melt lead, etc... Time is also a factor, so using Archimedes principle is also out. (thanks though, Rick)

I have begun to ask for some quotes for the spray arc of some zinc. I'll post back to add to the body of knowledge once I find out costs.

Jon - I'll be in Maine as well, we our paths may cross frequently! We'll be up there before June. Please do stay in touch. I'll pop in to check PMs here from time to time to see how you are making out. It shouldn't be tough for us to find each other... our boats share many similarities.
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Old 18-03-2007, 06:48   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ssullivan

Does anyone know how to tell if a given CQR is one of the ones with lead in the tip? I have heard nothing but conflicting stories about this.
Hi SSULLIVAN,

one answer to your questions :


If your CQR is a genuine one and if it has not been modified by a previous owner, it has NO lead in the tip.. This is one of its weakness, not enough weight on the tip (about 18%) and much too much in the shank (62%)
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Old 18-03-2007, 07:42   #7
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Hi Alain:

Thank you for that answer. It was just confirmed by Lewmar's CQR division this morning as well. The gentleman in charge of the CQR production told me that it is mild steel, not lead in the tip of the CQR. They hot dip galvanize them all the time, so as long as you have a real CQR (they're made in Scotland), you can put it through a standard hot dip galvanizing process.

The lead in the tip is just a legend, or possibly a confusion with CQR knockoffs.

BTW: Thank you for the input you made to the article in Good Old Boat Magazine. Your method of rope to chain splicing looks interesting.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Alain d'HYLAS
Hi SSULLIVAN,

one answer to your questions :


If your CQR is a genuine one and if it has not been modified by a previous owner, it has NO lead in the tip.. This is one of its weakness, not enough weight on the tip (about 18%) and much too much in the shank (62%)
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Old 18-03-2007, 08:10   #8
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I agree with Alain, there not being enough weight in the tip, and now knowing the tip is of mild steel, I'm wondering if it's hollow and could you possibly drill a few holes to pour a bit of lead in?
Bill,
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Old 18-03-2007, 10:39   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billangiep
knowing the tip is of mild steel, I'm wondering if it's hollow and could you possibly drill a few holes to pour a bit of lead in?

Hi Bill,

No it is not hollow.. but you can weld a plate under the plow tip and fill it with lead, I know poeple who did it and it improve the setting..
but there is nothing you can do to reduce the heavy hinge (except buying a Delta :0) )

Take a donkey and equip it with a beautifull saddle, it will still stay a donkey!.. :0)
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Old 18-03-2007, 11:59   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ssullivan
Does anyone know how to tell if a given CQR is one of the ones with lead in the tip? I have heard nothing but conflicting stories about this.
Sean,

Here is an excerpt from one of Craig Smith's (Rocna) posts on the SSCA board:

Fred's warning about lead-tipped CQRs and a Baltimore galvanizing house's explanation that a 820F hot-dip will melt 617F lead prompted me to ask Lewmar. The following is the e-mail I received from a Lewmar (Simpson-Lawrence) tech rep on the subject. It suggests that CQRs with a lead tip are the exception. Good to know.

I did some research .

It is believed that a very limited number of the very early (pre-Simpson-Lawrence, before they purchased CQR) anchors may have had lead for tip ballast. None of the drawings S-L bought when they acquired the manufacturing rights to the CQR (pre-1982 to my knowledge at least) mention the use of lead. Simpson Lawrence has never produced any CQR anchor at any time no matter the size using lead as weight in the ballast. If somebody has a CQR anchor with lead ballast and it says 'CQR' tell them they have a rare CQR anchor that has not been seen by any of the Simpson Lawrence staff and it is an antique that predates our involvement with these anchors.

The fact still remains there are very good copies of the CQR that have fooled even us. I myself have seen such two copies that were not forged (Cast shanks) with our Icon CQR and made in Scotland on the shank. I returned these to our works who proved they were phony copies. There are hundreds of copies. Some say “Made in Scotland” on the shank and do not have CQR on the other side, Some Have “CQUR” on the shank. I have seen many that have just “CQR” on the shank. There are many versions and many copies.
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