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Old 31-03-2010, 10:07   #16
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Originally Posted by danielgoldberg View Post
I agree that when deploying the anchor you should just release the clutch and let it free fall for several reasons, but I'm not sure I understand why you think that impacts whether the anchor gets set properly.
I must admit that the statement is based on my experience with our 176 lb (80kg) anchor but I can see it working for lighter anchors too. When our anchor hits the seabed at free fall speed, it puts a crater in it of 1-2' deep (1' in sand) and the anchor immediately sets right there. If I lay it on the seabed gently (I tested this, would never do this normally), it takes about 10' of "dragging" before it sets.

If there are small rocks or coral pieces or vegetation, the impact also increases the chance for a successful set significantly. This is purely based on observation of other boats as I never tested it. Basically ,the boats that use the clutch, always set the anchor on the first try while the "electric down" crowd often needs multiple tries and never get it set where they intend to except in the lightest conditions.

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Old 31-03-2010, 10:33   #17
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To save big bucks on boatstuff visit some swap meets or marine flea markets. You will often find real deals from people that just want to get rid of unused stuff. One guy I saw in recent flea was selling 300' rodes for 20$ stainless cowls for $15 etc...
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Old 31-03-2010, 11:23   #18
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To save big bucks on boatstuff visit some swap meets or marine flea markets. You will often find real deals from people that just want to get rid of unused stuff. One guy I saw in recent flea was selling 300' rodes for 20$ stainless cowls for $15 etc...
I paid $225 for a 66# steel Spade. New price over a $1,000.

Spinnaker pole equally cheap.

Now, if I could just find a dodger that fits my custom setup that is in good shape . . . .
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Old 31-03-2010, 11:35   #19
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Before I bought a new anchor I would:
1. Talk to the PO on why there are three different anchors on board. How were they used? Were there any problems?
2. Go out and test the anchors during the day in conditions you might find at night. How do they work. Remember the Danforth types are good in mud and sand. The plow is better when there are rocks or weeds around. Bruce styles are OK if oversized. (personally don't like them--but have many friends that do!) Look at your chart and match the anchor to the bottom type.
3. If PO had many problems and tests reveal the anchors are dragging then consider a new generation anchor.
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Old 31-03-2010, 11:41   #20
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Originally Posted by s/v Jedi View Post
I must admit that the statement is based on my experience with our 176 lb (80kg) anchor but I can see it working for lighter anchors too. When our anchor hits the seabed at free fall speed, it puts a crater in it of 1-2' deep (1' in sand) and the anchor immediately sets right there. If I lay it on the seabed gently (I tested this, would never do this normally), it takes about 10' of "dragging" before it sets.

If there are small rocks or coral pieces or vegetation, the impact also increases the chance for a successful set significantly. This is purely based on observation of other boats as I never tested it. Basically ,the boats that use the clutch, always set the anchor on the first try while the "electric down" crowd often needs multiple tries and never get it set where they intend to except in the lightest conditions.

ciao!
Nick.
Interesting. I never thought about that. Though I do question whether an anchor dropping could cause a 2' crater (at least not a 60 or 70lb anchor that I'd be using). Nevertheless, it's an interesting thought. I use the freefall function mostly to save wear on the windlass.
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Old 31-03-2010, 12:38   #21
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I have observed the crater that dropping anchors creates as well but unfortunately, it was again with a large anchor. The boat that I used to work on had a 500lb working anchor and a 750lb storm anchor. Since the windlass had no reverse, we would lay out chain ahead of it and drop the anchor by letting the catting line go. The only problem with this method besides the manual labor involved in laying out 3/4" chain was that you dropped all of the chain right on top of the anchor unless you were moving quickly when you dropped the anchor. It was pretty rare that the water was shallow enough and clear enough that I could dive down and see anything but when I did, it definitely left a crater.
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Old 31-03-2010, 13:20   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s/v Jedi View Post
I must admit that the statement is based on my experience with our 176 lb (80kg) anchor but I can see it working for lighter anchors too. When our anchor hits the seabed at free fall speed, it puts a crater in it of 1-2' deep (1' in sand) and the anchor immediately sets right there. If I lay it on the seabed gently (I tested this, would never do this normally), it takes about 10' of "dragging" before it sets.

If there are small rocks or coral pieces or vegetation, the impact also increases the chance for a successful set significantly. This is purely based on observation of other boats as I never tested it. Basically ,the boats that use the clutch, always set the anchor on the first try while the "electric down" crowd often needs multiple tries and never get it set where they intend to except in the lightest conditions.

ciao!
Nick.
I watched a guy in a power boat let his anchor "Free Fall".. when trying to stop it the chain jumped from the gypsy wearing a trench in his fiberglass and when it got to the end, it had so much momentum in the chain, it pulled the bracket off the inside of the hull tearing a hole and the boat sank right there in about 20 minutes..
It was durring the 4 of july event out at mandiville point and even with all the other boats around, no-one knew it was going down until it actually did..
With over 400 feet of chain on my anchor, I think I'll let mine down nice and easy....
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Old 31-03-2010, 13:26   #23
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I find the idea of free-falling anchors creating craters a little counter-intuitive.
Id expect the water density to significantly slow the falling anchor reducing the force of its impact.
Id also expect the weight of water above, to discourage the ejection of sand from the nascent crater.

Perhaps someone qualified would address the physics of gravitational acceleration in a dense fluid such as water.

Falling in Water
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Old 31-03-2010, 13:28   #24
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possible faulty assumption

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Spohn View Post
Before I bought a new anchor I would:
1. Talk to the PO on why there are three different anchors on board. How were they used? Were there any problems?
When I sold my last boat, the #1 working anchor and the storm anchor both came with me to the new boat, and I left a Claw anchor behind. Likewise, were I to sell the current boat, the Rocna would stay with me, and the new owner would get the Delta anchor that originally came with the boat. I've been saving it for him in storage.

I guess the point here is that it wouldn't be a safe assumption that the anchors that come with the boat were ever used on that boat by the previous owner. Or the rodes, for that matter.
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Old 31-03-2010, 15:31   #25
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My previous anchor was a Bruce and I can see the advantage of dropping it hard.
The new one is a Spade and a little heavier too. You can lay it down as gentle as you like and it sets in 1 or 2 feet.

A boat has lots of critical components but the anchor system is a major one that can cost or save your life, family and boat.

What's that worth?
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Old 31-03-2010, 16:04   #26
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A boat has lots of critical components but the anchor system is a major one that can cost or save your life, family and boat.

What's that worth?
I agree with this sentiment entirely. And not just because of the point you make, which of course is valid, but there are other reasons too. If your anchoring setup is easy and secure, then you'll anchor more often, and when you do you'll feel comfortable, sleep well, and be safe. If your anchoring setup is inconvenient, not easy to deploy/retrieve, or in any way lousy (including not having confidence that your anchor will set and hold), then you won't anchor as much, if at all, and when you do you'll stress and not enjoy yourself. Likewise, if you're not anchoring as much, that means you're taking a mooring or going dockside. Depends on where you are of course, but around our home sailing area, a single night at a transient dock is the better part of $200, and some places it's more. Even moorings will be $50+. It's not hard to figure that it doesn't take too many nights at marinas/moorings to pay for that anchor/windlass/extra samson post or whatever it is you feel you need to anchor comfortably. Heck, I gotta go, I can't affort NOT to buy a Rocna!
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Old 31-03-2010, 17:42   #27
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A-MEN!

Funny thing is, boaters who anchor a lot and go places all the time are happy to spend $$$$$$ on good gear.

The dock divas.... not so much
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Old 31-03-2010, 18:23   #28
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We've got a 40 pound or so CQR that hasn't caused any problems, but I've been eyeing a $1000 or so 80 pound manson. It will be a beast to be sure and we have a manual windlass, but I don't mind the workout and having that much metal underneath us will make me sleep better at nights.

I've never considered cheaping out on ground tackle. If there was ever an area that you don't want to cheap out, it's a toss up between your rig and your ground tackle, and honestly I'd rather get dismasted then end up on a rocky beach (we just stepped our mast after a year of re-rigging, so trust me I care about our rig).

Don't cheap out on the ground tackle. Save the money by not buying a bunch of electronics that don't make you a better sailor.
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Old 01-04-2010, 05:31   #29
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Funny thing is, boaters who anchor a lot and go places all the time are happy to spend $$$$$$ on good gear.
The dock divas.... not so much
Seems rational to me.
Spend money on what you'll use, and save where you won't.
ie: A Yachtie needs a blazer & club tie, whereas a cruiser might not (so much).
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Old 01-04-2010, 06:47   #30
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Think of you anchor like brakes on your car - there are a lot of systems on a car (windshield wipers, air conditioning, even engine etc.) that by failing can cause inconvenience, but loosing your brakes can be catastrophic.

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