Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 15-03-2009, 11:56   #31
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
overkill

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ancora Latina View Post
Snubber hook should be at least as strong as the chain..
The snubber hook need only be as strong as the nylon snubber itself.

I've yet to see a reason to invest huge amounts into a snubber system. A six-dollar galvanized chain hook, properly sized, and forty feet of 1/2' nylon three-strand, and I've got what I need for normal anchorage. For storm conditions, a spare chain hook to which I can shackle a couple of stout 1" dock lines, and I'm set.
__________________

__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-03-2009, 12:04   #32
Do or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 9,198
As I keep thinking about what Gord wrote (long snubber) I actually think that his experience is valid, but only because the snubber is too thick. If it is, it won't stretch enough and you need more length to achieve the same shock absorbing effect. I think 1/2" nylon for a 6500 lbs boat is more an anchor rode than a snubber.

Gord, you should try a 10' snubber from 5/16" 3-strand nylon !!

cheers,
Nick.
__________________

__________________
s/v Jedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-03-2009, 12:09   #33
Do or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 9,198
Bash: I tried galvanized because I don't like stainless on my galvanized chain, but it became a real mess with corrosion etc. I since switched to a stainless hook (still rather cheap) and never had any trouble ( > 5 years now). But I also try to keep it above water because of growth on the nylon part.

cheers,
Nick.
__________________
s/v Jedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-03-2009, 12:23   #34
Registered User
 
Celestialsailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: In Mexico, working on the boat
Boat: Hallberg Rassy 35. and 14ft.Whitehall pulling skiff.
Posts: 8,013
Images: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ancora Latina View Post
Sorry Chala,

Ive been using this type of snubber hook during years of living aboard, and It didnt unhook once!..

About the nice looking shiny "Wichard main de fer ", have a look at its SWL... about half the one of the chain it is used to... and they have been several cases of broken ones..

Joo
Sorry Joao...I have that type unhook twice in 70+ kt winds and big surge in an anchorage. I find it safer using a knot now.
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: Wow - what a ride!"

http://wwwjolielle.blogspot.com/
Celestialsailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-03-2009, 12:24   #35
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,583
Images: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by s/v Jedi View Post
Gord: never tested my theory, but I think a snubber can be too long.
I think a 1/2" nylon snubber is too thick for a 29' 6500 lbs boat.
Nick.
You may be right about “too much of a good thing”, regarding snubber length. I’ve never fully deployed my “long” snubbers, but have been disappointed with short (15' - 20' ?) jury-rigged shock-absorbers.
I also deploy a sentinel weight, which many of our mathematically inclined theorists will dismiss, which may mitigate some of the “bow swing” of which you warn. Nonetheless, the minor inconvenience of un-deployed line on deck has never discouraged me from fabricating longer snubbers.

Your right - my entire “permanent” mooring tackle was way oversized. I re-rigged that (huge) existing concrete block mooring, and sized everything to accommodate much larger boats (50 - 60' range).
My normal anchor rodes* consisted of 1/4" and 5/16" H.T Chain, with " & 5/16" rope, snubbed with 3/8" line**. (*I carried 3 or 4 anchor assemblies).

** See my annecdote about a "small stuff" snubber.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2009, 20:01   #36
Registered User
 
roger.waite's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Plimmerton, New Zealand
Boat: Samsara, a Ross 930
Posts: 380
Lightbulb Thanks Kanani

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kanani View Post
Not enough can be said about not motoring into wind gusts. Very dangerous. Having the motor running to avoid other vessels dragging by or getting out if something breaks, is a good idea.
Thanks for that Kanani - got me thinking more about what I should do - which is the prime reason for participating in the forum.
__________________
roger.waite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2009, 21:37   #37
Marine Service Provider
 
GMac's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: North of the Bridge, thankfully
Boat: R930
Posts: 1,659
Interesting thread.

When deploying 2 anchors I use the technique that Kanani said at the start. But I run my rodes out at more like 120 degrees with one set out further than the other. If the boat swings one rode goes over the other and apart from a small rope overlap everything stays nice. All the anchor rodes and usually anchors (I play with many anchors so can be mismatched at times) I carry are identical in every way.

But saying that I know a few people who have used and swear by the in-line method. Personally doing it my way leaves you knowing for sure the systems are well set and I like knowing that.

Snubber I don't use currently, I run rope chain combo rodes so don't need one. But short fat snubbers are only good for noise stopping. Longer thinner work sooner and more smoothly when talking shock absorption. We run the programme of one size rope down from what would normally be used and longer rather than shorter. Remembering that 99% of the time the weakest item in your system is the anchors holding load rather than any of the gear behind it. But then as you get up in boat size it does swing the other way often.

Roger, you would have fun in real big waves trying to hold your boat with the motor I'd think. Check my thingy to the left to see why I say that, it has one of my current toys listed
__________________
GMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-05-2009, 21:02   #38
Registered User
 
Extemporaneous's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Canada
Boat: Corbin 39 Special Edition
Posts: 909
Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Ive never had a standard chain hook come off my snubber either; but would prefer a longer throat as shown on the Wichard hook; or the one thinwater fabricated here: Chain hook for Catamarans...

I also wonder why the snubber line is not directly attached with a braided eye & thimble. The pictured assembly is only approximately as strong as a single wrap of the smaller stuff.
Does anyone know if the attached chain shorteners stay on the chain very well. It says that it has a spring (you can see it in the pic) to hold the chain in but I'm sure that it would corrode off in short order.

Anyone?
Extemp.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Chain Snubber.jpg
Views:	175
Size:	328.8 KB
ID:	8168  
__________________
Extemporaneous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-05-2009, 01:17   #39
Marine Service Provider
 
GMac's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: North of the Bridge, thankfully
Boat: R930
Posts: 1,659
It should do Extemp as long as you have the load on the snubber not the chain. But it is a steel fitting and will rust, not big nasty stuff as it is a high tensile steel which tend to get nasty surface rust more than the flaky rust.

Yes the spring will rust out in no time. No it is not a good idea to galvanise it as it is a very high tensile steel so it could go quite bad. I suppose you could cold galv it, that would be OK.
__________________
GMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-05-2009, 16:04   #40
Writing Full-Time Since 2014
 
thinwater's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Boat: PDQ Altair, 32/34
Posts: 4,338
The only stories of chain hooks coming off I know of were caused by touching bottom.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Extemporaneous View Post
Does anyone know if the attached chain shorteners stay on the chain very well. It says that it has a spring (you can see it in the pic) to hold the chain in but I'm sure that it would corrode off in short order.

Anyone?
Extemp.
Normally, to keep the hook on, you want a nice lazy loop of chain hanging down between the boat and the hook. It weights the hook. However, if you anchor in shallow waters a lot, it is common for the hook to lay on the bottom. Then, there is one chance in very many, with no load, that it can forced off by the mud.

You can lash the hook on, anchor deeper, not worry about it coming off because the line backs it up and you will hear the change, or you can build or buy one with a latch.

Also, Kong makes a locking chain grab shackle, but I have never heard anyone speak of it. Defender carries it.

I am happy with my plate, but also consider that catamarans use snubbers / bridles every night and in a different way.
__________________
Gear Testing--Engineering--Sailing

Writing full-time since 2014.
Bookstore:http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/20...ook-store.html
thinwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-05-2009, 21:21   #41
Marine Service Provider
 
GMac's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: North of the Bridge, thankfully
Boat: R930
Posts: 1,659
Quote:
Originally Posted by thinwater View Post
Also, Kong makes a locking chain grab shackle, but I have never heard anyone speak of it. Defender carries it.
We've got those but not huge fans to be honest. The loads are surprisingly low, which isn't really a biggie I suppose. The hassle we see is just doing up and undoing a shackle. Could be quite trick in some cases and if all hell was breaking lose that may take a minute or 2 'just too long'. But they are nicely made, have captive pins and a nice end to attach the rope. I'd prefer a hook/plate arrangement myself.
__________________
GMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-05-2009, 23:12   #42
Wayfaring Mariner
 
captain58sailin's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Homer, AK is my home port
Boat: Skookum 53'
Posts: 4,045
Images: 5
Why not rig a pelican hook on the end of your snubber?
__________________
captain58sailin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-05-2009, 04:38   #43
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,583
Images: 240
What GMac said about Kong Chain Grippers.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Kong Chain Gripper.jpg
Views:	139
Size:	35.1 KB
ID:	8205  
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-05-2009, 15:31   #44
Writing Full-Time Since 2014
 
thinwater's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Boat: PDQ Altair, 32/34
Posts: 4,338
Interesting to hear the report - Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GMac View Post
We've got those but not huge fans to be honest. The loads are surprisingly low, which isn't really a biggie I suppose. The hassle we see is just doing up and undoing a shackle. Could be quite trick in some cases and if all hell was breaking lose that may take a minute or 2 'just too long'. But they are nicely made, have captive pins and a nice end to attach the rope. I'd prefer a hook/plate arrangement myself.

That is the nice thing about forums.

Yes, the fiddling while hanging over the bow discouraged me from buying the Kong Grabber. The plate, and the other hand, is threaded under the rode, and the chain practically falls into it when you move it side-to-side. A chain hook is probably better suited to a monohull - I defer to those who have them.
__________________
Gear Testing--Engineering--Sailing

Writing full-time since 2014.
Bookstore:http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/20...ook-store.html
thinwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-05-2009, 18:27   #45
Eternal Member
 
Ancora Latina's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Florianopolis - Brasil
Posts: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by thinwater View Post
A chain hook is probably better suited to a monohull - I defer to those who have them.
__________________
Ancora Latina
www.ancoralatina.com
Ancora Latina is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
anchor, anchoring, cyclones, hurricane, storms

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
queensland storms. cooper Cruising News & Events 0 28-02-2008 22:33
West coast storms Randyonr3 Cruising News & Events 4 06-01-2008 21:39
Surge in cyclones (QSLD) predicted for next month micoverde Pacific & South China Sea 12 31-12-2007 18:29
Cyclones Lost yacht Grib files. Jacana Health, Safety & Related Gear 1 30-12-2007 08:10
lightning storms pete33458 Seamanship & Boat Handling 34 04-11-2007 19:49



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:10.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.