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Old 21-12-2009, 17:36   #1
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Anchor Bridle vs Single Line Snubber

Hi All!! Yes, I'm a new first mate...I searched around a little(not lot), for opinions on an anchor bridle versus a snubber. We have a anchor bridle, with an open hook, to 3/8 chain. The previous owner said he used it from both bow cleats through the chocks to the anchor chain. I met a longtime sailor last week who showed me the single line snubber tied to the chain with a rolling hitch, back to the samson post with a cleat hitch.

Not sure if it's relevant, but we have a 35ft sundeck trawler. Currently have a 35lb plow and 180 feet of 3/8 chain. (We know it's a little undersized...we'll be upgrading that anchor soon.)

So....give it to me...what is your opinion of one way over the other? Double bridle or single line snubber??

Thanks in advance!!
Bess
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Old 21-12-2009, 17:39   #2
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try them both, you may find that your particular boat likes to sail at anchor with a single line, or the only way to make it anchor well is to pull one line of the bridle a little tighter that the other.
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Old 21-12-2009, 17:46   #3
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a second vote in favor of multiple snubbers

I just read a post on another site about someone who lost his boat after the snubber chaffed through.

Latitude 38 - The West's Premier Sailing & Marine Magazine

So much for the theory that a single snubber is sufficient.
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Old 21-12-2009, 18:48   #4
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Please explain. The chain should have still been attached.

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I just read a post on another site about someone who lost his boat after the snubber chaffed through.

Latitude 38 - The West's Premier Sailing & Marine Magazine

So much for the theory that a single snubber is sufficient.
Second, it chafed through because it was rubbing on something, unprotected.

The chain should have been round a sampson post or in a lock.

So the statement is missing something. Or the sailor just made multiple errors in bad conditions.
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Old 21-12-2009, 20:04   #5
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Thanks Ya'll!! Yeah, I read that story too. I figure now is the time to ask a bunch of questions before the warm weather returns. We've only anchored a few times for lunch and swimming so far.

Would you use the bridle under the bow sprit or through the roller??
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Old 21-12-2009, 20:06   #6
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Can I call it bowsprit if we're a trawler?
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Old 23-12-2009, 04:54   #7
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Yes you can, that is what it is.
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Old 23-12-2009, 07:30   #8
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To me, a single line snubber will attach to the sampson post and take the pressure off of the windlass. A double line will attach to the sampson post and exit either side of the bow and take the load off of the windlass. I have no idea how the loss of either setup will cause you to lose your boat.......unless the chain feeds freely out of the anchor locker with nothing attaching the bitter end to the boat.
You'll have to try both to see what your boat likes...... there is no one cure for all problems with boats.
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Old 23-12-2009, 07:35   #9
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The choice depends on many factors including the configuration of your boat, chocks, anchor roller etc.

A bridle will move the working load from one line to the other as the ow moves through the wind. This may or may not result in chafe.

I look for the lead which is the most fair and least likely to chafe. I use a mooring compensator into the snubber to further reduce shock loads and this works fine with my single line snubber running over the bow roller.
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Old 23-12-2009, 07:57   #10
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Hi, Bess - congrats on the new boat.

One reason I'd encourage you to experiment with both basic types of snubbers is that I think you'll find the single-line option simpler (as Defjef's post suggests). That's certainly been my experience.

Also, keep in mind that - after you've anchored and everything is 'set' - you may find it necessary to adjust the length of your rode. One example - happened to me in Bermuda - is that a little thunderstorm arrives, there's a wind shift, and the boat that was on your side is now right in front of you, a little too close, and you'll want to drop back a bit. Adjusting the rode is a bit more fiddly with the bridle.

This also illustrates why I'd recommend you use a rolling hitch vs. a chain hook. Imagine the above scenario: The wind's both shifted and picked up steam, the rode's under some strain and you want the adjustment to minimize finger- and hand-based activities near that chain. With a 20' length of nylon snubber hitched to the chain, you don't have to deal with that hitch. Use the windlass to take up on the chain (to release the snubber line's tension), unfasten the snubber (now unloaded and easily/safely done), veer some more chain (with the snubber line zipping over the bow roller, staying attached & disappearing), brake the chain with the windlass and then put on your 2nd snubber line (which you have handy for just this reason). Later, retrieving the chain will bring the 1st snubber back to you.

Practice tying a rolling hitch a bit and it will become very quick and simple to use, and very reliable (unlike that chain hook I've had fall off my rodes on many occasions). After tying the knot, 'work on it' just a bit, scrunching the turns together so the whole hitch is snug and tightening any loose parts. Only takes an additional 5-10 secs and gives you some additional confidence.

Be sure to not leave the chain on the windlass' gypsy and the brake engaged. If the snubber fails, you'll risk damaging the windlass.

Jack
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Old 23-12-2009, 08:55   #11
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Be sure to not leave the chain on the windlass' gypsy and the brake engaged. If the snubber fails, you'll risk damaging the windlass.

Jack
But if you don't set the chain break won't the boat just float free if the snubber fails?
I have always set the chain brake and then put a snubber on if desired so the chain takes the strain if the rope fails. How that will damage the windlass.

Jim
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Old 23-12-2009, 09:39   #12
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I use a version of a chain hook and there is no problem in veering more chain. As Jack T suggests, I wind in the chain and as I do it I pull the snubber line which is set over the bow roller. Once the hook is over the roller and obviously before it arrives at the gypsy, I unhook it with no problem at all. In fact, the chain is taut between the roller and the gypsy so it's quite easy to get it off and then on again after I've let more chain out. In fact I don't even have to bend down and can do it with one hand and hold on to the pulpit with the other!

I hitch may be secure... I don't think it necessary is, but it takes more time to do it, undo it whatever and I do not see the advantage...except the splice and the shackle etc which adds additional places for the assembly to fail.

However these are easily inspected. So I am not too concerned about this.
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Old 24-12-2009, 09:01   #13
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Cruising Yacht Lost in Cyclone Mick in Fiji:
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Of snubbers & chain ...
WS_newsandnotes_Cruising-Yacht-Lost-in-Cyclone-Mick-in-Fiji.html
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Old 24-12-2009, 09:39   #14
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So from the story, the snubber did fail, but if the chain had been held by a chain stopper the nylon rode would have never chafed in the hawse pipe. Not the fault of the snubber at all!!
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Old 24-12-2009, 10:42   #15
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So from the story, the snubber did fail, but if the chain had been held by a chain stopper the nylon rode would have never chafed in the hawse pipe. Not the fault of the snubber at all!!
Indeed !!!
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