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Old 17-01-2007, 12:48   #1
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Walker Bay Sailing

Has anybody seen, heard or otherwise know of the performance of the Walker Bay 10 RID under their 'high performance' sail? I have see some reviews of the simple (boomless) rig and the 'performance rig' (with boom) but nothing on the high performance set-up (with boom and foresail, larger, roached main).

Would seem to be an interesting tender, if it sails well.

Thanks

MD
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Old 17-01-2007, 16:39   #2
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Our club has 5 Walker Bay 10s which we use at least once a month. None have the high performance rig. The WB 10s sail as you would expect a 10 foot sailing dinghy to sail. Not extremely good to weather but fun for the kids.
Are you talking about the Inflatable tube addition? We don't have any of those. Too costly but it would be much more stable and slower.
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Old 18-01-2007, 02:56   #3
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The tube is not supposed to touch the water, so should not affect performance, other than weight. The stiffer rig, better centreboard and jib is supposed to make the boat point higher, which is what I am trying to confirm. I would have the tube, as a 'fender' as well as for boyancy.

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Old 18-01-2007, 07:02   #4
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I'm willing to bet that if you're sailing, you will heel and the tube will touch the water. Using the term "high performance" on a walker bay is cute but it is a 10' sailing dinghy and not very stream lined. If you're expecting to be going like a sun fish, you will be disappointed.

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Old 18-01-2007, 07:18   #5
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Yes, I am sure you are correct. If you balance the boat correctly, you may well get straight lines courses (broad reach, down wind) that you dont touch, but I am sure it will happen now and again. But this should not affect pointing ability too much

Hence my question, really: is it worth it? Does it increase utility or fun, or is it just extra pain to rig.
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Old 18-01-2007, 12:03   #6
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Aloha Again Moby,
Two areas where we've found problems on our Walker Bays. The gooseneck to mast fitting has come undone on a couple and the plastic parts on the rudder where it fits into the gudgeons have broken on a couple. We completely lost one rudder because of it.
The interior bottom of our boats become very slick when wet but I understand they have since installed some nonskid there. Check it before you buy.
I would think that with two adults and some gear in them the tubes will be touching the water and the extra drag will slow you. With just one person and no gear you might be able to keep the tubes out of the water but I don't think I could the way I like to heel the little buggers over.
The WBs are great little boats if treated properly and I would think you would get better performance with a little jib on it. They are an ideal little maintenance free tender. I've found that a hard chined sailing pram about the same length will out perform the WB and provide a great deal more initial stability. Of course this is just my experience with the boats.
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Old 19-01-2007, 02:30   #7
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OK, thanks for info/opinions

MD
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Old 29-04-2007, 19:18   #8
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I am seriously considering purchasing a Walker Bay 8-foot Rigid (without the inflatable collar), to use as an actual dinghy for my ODay 23 sailboat. I like the fact that I can put it inside of my mini van and take it home from my mooring area, which is not secure from theft, plus it will tow fairly effortlessly behind my sailboat underway. I wonder about its durability and how well it can carry me and wifey plus small dog to the mooring from the beach, about 900 yds away across sheltered water. I plan to use my 2.5 hp Mercury outboard to propel it. Any opinions?
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Old 29-04-2007, 19:52   #9
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Yes. How much do you, your wife, and your dog weigh? The Walker Bay's have a very limited weight capacity, and are unforgiving if you excede it. They tend to take on water,especially if you are a big guy, and sit too far aft. A sinking dinghy does not make for a happy first mate.
That aside, they are an adaquate dinghy for the purpose you describe. I would double check that it will fit in the mini van though. It will not fit in a VW bus, but that is another story
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Old 29-04-2007, 20:31   #10
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My van is a Grand Caravan Sto n' Go. Me, n' the wife, n' the dog weigh about 380..390 after dinner. The 8' Walker Bay maxes out at 450, they say. How much does a case of beer weigh?

Hmmm..water over the transom, huh. That'd be wet for the outboard. Better refigger this dinghy candidature thing..... or use oars and sit in the middle with wifey at the stern. Little bit of a thing, she is. Dogs ALWAYS ride paws on the stem, tongues hangin' out...Hmmm, now where to put the beer?
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Old 29-04-2007, 20:49   #11
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Don't know about the new sto n go stuff I can tell you it will be a wet ride that close to maxed out. You also need to consider the weight of the outboard. With you rowing, it should work OK, but if she wants to row, it might be a problem. (I would rather not say how I know this)
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Old 30-04-2007, 03:33   #12
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Beer is very close to water ,and that is 8 pounds per gallon (128 ounces), and a case of beer contains 24 x 12 oz bottles/can (288 Oz, or 2.25 Gal); so a case of beer weighs about (2.25 Gal x 8 Lbs) 18 Lbs PLUS the containers & packaging.
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Old 30-04-2007, 12:36   #13
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Walker Bay 8 will do you just fine. I prefer a pram the same size with hard chine if it is going to be a tender but the 8 will take care of you and is nearly indestructible. (It will gouge and scratch up on coral and rocks.)
Weight distribution while rowing and motoring is critical. Heavy person in the center. Lighter person steering the outboard. Dog in the bow with the beer. Don't tow it in heavy weather. I lost a dinghy that way.
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Old 30-04-2007, 17:46   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiprJohn
Walker Bay 8 will do you just fine. I prefer a pram the same size with hard chine if it is going to be a tender but the 8 will take care of you and is nearly indestructible. (It will gouge and scratch up on coral and rocks.)
Weight distribution while rowing and motoring is critical. Heavy person in the center. Lighter person steering the outboard. Dog in the bow with the beer. Don't tow it in heavy weather. I lost a dinghy that way.
Kind Regards,
JohnL
Thanks SkiprJohn, for this opinion. I agree with you on all the points made. I did, this morning, make a purchase of the WB8, sans flotation collar, because of the overriding need to be able to carry it inside of my Dodge Grand Caravan, and it does just fit. Here in Canada it costs 1020 dollars with taxes included.

I sail only on inland protected waters and never in what you would call heavy weather, such as in the Pacific Ocean. The freshwater seas hereabouts are never bigger than 6 feet, but even so, can get into a nasty cross-chop and confused state when the wind is in conflict with tide and current. In such cases we beat into a secluded and sheltered anchorage and drop the hook until it blows over.

I intend to have my local upholsterer make up a heavy synthetic fabric tube, of sufficient diameter to accomodate an 18-foot long bundle of 4 swimming pool noodles, in a more or less circular-cross sectional configuration (noodles are very flexible closed-cell vinyl foam rolls about 3" in diameter and four feet long, and they cost a dollar each, retail) and to make this contraption long enough to completely surround the exterior perimeter of the dinghy, just below the sheer chine of the WB8 Dinghy gunwhale, something like the existing hypalon collar made by WB. It will be about 18 cubic feet in displacement size, overall. Theoretical increase in bouyancy is about 1000 lbs., in fresh water. That oughta do it. Will save the gelcoat on my sailboat too. Yes, I will have to tow it, asmy sailboat is 23 LOA and 7'11" beam. I will use a floating towline and trail a small drogue behind the dinghy, which will carry a 2.5 hp Merc O/B.

This floatation gadget will be attached somewhat differently than the Hypalon collar that WB sells here, (for 1200 dollars !), in that it will have a quick-disconnect feature (using a type of hard nylon quick-release push-to-click harness buckles common on heavy duty back packs, one end rivetted to the dinghy hull and sewn into the float tube on the other end). This will allow easy removal of the flotation collar for transport inside my van, while being secure in the water. It will cost me 175 dollars to have made. It will not suffer from punctures. In my estimation it will increase both the stability and the cargo capacity of the dinghy by a large margin.

Necessity is the mother of invention.
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Old 30-04-2007, 23:21   #15
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I'd like to hear how the collar works out. I'd recommend a way in which to easily replace the noodles when you need to. I've used noodles for supporting stuff on a trailer and they sometimes do compress and stay in a compressed shape if left that way for long. Sounds like a great way to beat the cost of the WB tubes.
Good luck
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