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Old 01-05-2007, 08:05   #16
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Yes, SkprJohn, noodles do compress under load and they can stay that way, especially if it is really hot weather and if compressed for a prolonged period. They also perish chemically over time. I agree that it would be easier to replace them annually, so I will make the collar so it can be opened. That is an excellent suggestion.

I am thinking of using a heavy nylon zipper, but a nylon cord lacing with grommets may be better, cheaper and stronger. I will send along photos in a couple of weeks or so, once the gadget is installed. BTW a friend has suggested a mooring anchor made from a large rubber tire, with its whole inner area filled with about 200 lbs of concete (cast into a garbage bag stuffed into the cavity before filling), and with a 3/4" rebar loop cast into it, for shackling to the chain. In a silted bottom, the flat circlar shape causes the anchor to gradually sink into the ooze and once buried, the vacuum it forms with the bottom holds it very securely. This system is used in several yacht clubs in Massachussets and it seems to work well for smaller vesels. The advantage is that the mooring anchor can be rolled easily up inclined ramps, etc, to ease placement from a small boat, without use of a crane. My mooring area is in a very well shelted cove with a sandy bottom in twelve feet of fresh water.

A vessel as large as yours is would require a very much larger mooring, especially in the seas that you must experience there. There is a marina here which uses 1200 lb. concrete blocks as mooring anchors (in an current-swept tideway) and they moor vessels as large as 50' there, but charge 500 dollars a season (or 5 dollars a day) for using a mooring.

Regards, SkipperCanuck
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Old 01-05-2007, 12:18   #17
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Aloha Skipper,
The moorings here in Reeds Bay need to be steel or lead. Concrete loses to much weight when submerged unless it is very very heavy. We have no ooze, mud, sand. Our moorings set on top of a rock called pahoehoe (smooth lava). 10 to 12 feet deep. If you could send me a couple containers of ooze I'd appreciate it.
Kind Regards,
JohnL
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Old 12-07-2008, 19:16   #18
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Is it okay to leave dinghy in the water ?

I just bought a walker bay 10 and want to use it primarily for rowing around my local waterway. I was wondering if it would be a bad idea to leave it permanently in the water behind my home. I do not have a lift and it is a little difficult getting it out of the water and into the yard because of the fence on the seawall. Will barnacles attach to this type of material ? I would appreciate any answers that could be offered.
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Old 03-07-2009, 05:34   #19
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<<This floatation gadget will be attached somewhat differently than the Hypalon collar that WB sells here, (for 1200 dollars !), in that it will have a quick-disconnect feature (using a type of hard nylon quick-release push-to-click harness buckles common on heavy duty back packs, one end rivetted to the dinghy hull and sewn into the float tube on the other end).>>

Any idea how the Walker Bay accessory attaches/detaches? I assume it is about 3" diameter.
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Old 03-07-2009, 06:26   #20
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Originally Posted by offthepoint View Post
Any idea how the Walker Bay accessory attaches/detaches? I assume it is about 3" diameter.
It's more like 6" diameter, I think. It has a boltrope-type arrangement that slides into metal rails from the bow. The rails are part of the kit and attach under the gunwhale.
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Old 06-07-2009, 09:15   #21
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We have a WB 10 RID and the flotation collar is easy to take off and put back on. The bolt rope arangement works just like a sail; easy to take off by just pulling a little, harder to put on unless you have two people (so one can act as the pre-feeder to keep it from going out of the track).
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Old 02-07-2010, 09:23   #22
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Walker Bay 10 Joke Boat

I purchased the full WB10 with inflatable tubes and the full performance sailing kit including jib in 2007 brand new.I have not had a minutes pleasure from it apart from rowing which is not really fun more a bad joke.
The boat has many design faults and very poor manafacture.
Due to the block in the centre rather than aft there is little room for one person let alone passengers.
The jib jumps out of its mounting and the method of fixing to the bow means that it loosens rapidly.
The neck of the boom will fall out of the mast unless very tightly hitched so that there is no flexibility in mid sail adjustment.
The jib sheets literally spring out of their cleats when under any tension.
With an outboard you have to have a long tiller extension because even a single person cannot sit at the back without bad wallowing.
I defy anybody to set up the mast on the water other than in a 0mph wind because the rubber neck of the boom is such a tight fit into the base of the mast that with the wind pressuring the sail it needs two people.
Yes it is good for rowing but remember though the boat is advertised as having three functions that are mutually exclusive: if you decide to sail get rigged up but you can't change your mind on the water and row instead as there is no room.
Finally believe me I have spent many aborted trips out with this boat and have got into bad scrapes on Tidal water. It is only fit for messing about on a small inland lake.
I hereby challenge anybody out ther to disagree!
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Old 05-01-2011, 20:31   #23
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No responses? I have just started my internet search for comments so this is putting me off the WBD right away?
Tim in Vancouver
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Old 06-01-2011, 12:13   #24
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Our Walker Bay boats do not have jibs. The kids rig them on the beach, not in the water. Yes, balance is better with some kind of throttle handle extension while motoring.
We've not experienced some of the rigging problems mentioned and don't have tidal shifts to contend with.
As with every boat, the area and purpose you use them will determine how they meet your needs.
kind regards,
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Old 06-01-2011, 15:05   #25
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Thanks. We are in Hawaii next month, but not in Big Island. There is a local dealer here for WBD so we will go have a look. We'll get something for the summer - as our son will be big enough - hopefully we can then contribute our experience to the forum.
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Old 23-04-2012, 11:13   #26
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Re: Walker Bay Sailing

Hey SkipperCanuck
Did you ever complete you noodle support system for this Walker Bay you were describing on this post? if so, how did it work? Do you have any pictures? problems? Or advice. I'm thinking of doing the same with mine.
Thanks for any more advice you can give.
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Old 22-09-2016, 16:21   #27
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Re: Walker Bay Sailing

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkipperCanuck View Post
Yes, SkprJohn, noodles do compress under load and they can stay that way, especially if it is really hot weather and if compressed for a prolonged period. They also perish chemically over time. I agree that it would be easier to replace them annually, so I will make the collar so it can be opened. That is an excellent suggestion.

I am thinking of using a heavy nylon zipper, but a nylon cord lacing with grommets may be better, cheaper and stronger. I will send along photos in a couple of weeks or so, once the gadget is installed. BTW a friend has suggested a mooring anchor made from a large rubber tire, with its whole inner area filled with about 200 lbs of concete (cast into a garbage bag stuffed into the cavity before filling), and with a 3/4" rebar loop cast into it, for shackling to the chain. In a silted bottom, the flat circlar shape causes the anchor to gradually sink into the ooze and once buried, the vacuum it forms with the bottom holds it very securely. This system is used in several yacht clubs in Massachussets and it seems to work well for smaller vesels. The advantage is that the mooring anchor can be rolled easily up inclined ramps, etc, to ease placement from a small boat, without use of a crane. My mooring area is in a very well shelted cove with a sandy bottom in twelve feet of fresh water.

A vessel as large as yours is would require a very much larger mooring, especially in the seas that you must experience there. There is a marina here which uses 1200 lb. concrete blocks as mooring anchors (in an current-swept tideway) and they moor vessels as large as 50' there, but charge 500 dollars a season (or 5 dollars a day) for using a mooring.

Regards, SkipperCanuck
whatever came of all these changes to the Walker Bay? I have a wb10 no corral with the performance sail kit.
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