Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 20-08-2011, 23:10   #16
Registered User

Join Date: May 2007
Location: New Zealand
Boat: Trismus 37
Posts: 760
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

The Walkerbay method of attaching their tubes is just a basic standard alloy extrusion that can be drilled and bolted on in the same way as on a Walkerbay dinghy, sew a bolt rope into whatever you are using to contain the floatation material and pull it through the said extrusion. Should work!
__________________

__________________
Steve Pope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-08-2011, 01:24   #17
Registered User
 
Viking Sailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: Fantasia 35 - s/v Feeling Good
Posts: 1,074
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

How about rolling up some of that 1/2" closed cell foam used for camping ground pads to make floats. It wont absorb water. Just roll it up tight with some contact cement and stuff it into 4" or 6" drain hose.

__________________

__________________
Viking Sailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-08-2011, 09:59   #18
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,369
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

Quote:
Originally Posted by Viking Sailor View Post
How about rolling up some of that 1/2" closed cell foam used for camping ground pads to make floats. It wont absorb water. Just roll it up tight with some contact cement and stuff it into 4" or 6" drain hose.

There ya go! Or if you decide to use peanuts.. make sure they're not the ones made out of corn! They melt with water. Great invention for the environment.

and......... what part of buying a RIB dont you understand?
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-08-2011, 17:02   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Duluth,Minnesota
Boat: Lindenberg 26 & Aloha 8.2
Posts: 984
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

John, you can buy the discharge hose up to 10" diameter but the bigger stuff gets thicker and therefore too heavy, 6" may be ok.
Cheech, you are right about the peanuts made from corn,best to do a test. About the RIBs,some of us just like reguar dinghies that row decent and can be powered by small light motors, i personally like tenders that i can portage up the beach on my shoulders , i dont want to have to drag it or need help to carry it but i still need to protect the topsides of the mothership and a bit of floatation high up wouldnt hurt either.
Steve.
__________________
clockwork orange is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-08-2011, 17:36   #20
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,369
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

I hear you for sure about keeping it light. Maybe what many of us are saying is........why isnt anyone making a light dingy with graceful lines and ........ Oh yeah........and small dia tubes?
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-08-2011, 11:07   #21
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 27
Images: 1
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

Can you explain in a bit more detail. I'm "DIY" challenged
__________________
andrewm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-08-2011, 11:15   #22
Registered User
 
TFrere's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: South Louisiana
Boat: Morgan 382 - 38' 4"
Posts: 50
Images: 10
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

Here is a 6" hose http://gatorpump.thomasnet.com/item/other-options-for-gator-pumps-fittings/blue-vinyl-discharge-hose/82106?


I thought about 2 sections of thin wall 6" PVC pipe straped to each side of my Walker Bay 10. I would probably have to paint the PVC to keep the sun from deteriorating it.
__________________
TFrere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-08-2011, 11:17   #23
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,369
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

I was thinking about this thread this morning. The problem I see is: unless the air tubes are as large as a RIB's or at least located down at the water line rather than up at the gunnel, stability improvement is going to be very minimal.... if at all. Bouyancy in passing bow waves might be improved though. The air tubes on a RIB essentially add a lot of beam to the boat. 6" tubes up at the gunnel are only going to even start working with the boat nearly totally up on its side!
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-08-2011, 11:29   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 27
Images: 1
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

I understand everyone's needs are a little different. Our small family needed an enjoyable small boat for rowing, fishing, and occasional sailing on 5-10 mile long lakes. With a medium sedan, we can't tow much more than a 10- to 12-footer weighing more than 150-200 lbs. I sometimes takes the kids and have to manipulate the boat single-handed with the small trailer and a canoe dolly. We used to use a canoe with pontoons/outriggers--wonderfully stable, but the kids couldn't stretch out and we can't use a motor or troll when we fish. With my precious princesses aboard (we all wear life vests at ALL TIMES), I think every measure towards stability is a good idea.
__________________
andrewm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-08-2011, 11:32   #25
Registered User
 
TFrere's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: South Louisiana
Boat: Morgan 382 - 38' 4"
Posts: 50
Images: 10
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

Here are some foam cylinders:
Polyethylene Foam, Roll, Tubes, Polyethylene Closed Cell Foam Sheets
__________________
TFrere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-08-2011, 14:21   #26
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,369
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewm View Post
I understand everyone's needs are a little different. Our small family needed an enjoyable small boat for rowing, fishing, and occasional sailing on 5-10 mile long lakes. With a medium sedan, we can't tow much more than a 10- to 12-footer weighing more than 150-200 lbs. I sometimes takes the kids and have to manipulate the boat single-handed with the small trailer and a canoe dolly. We used to use a canoe with pontoons/outriggers--wonderfully stable, but the kids couldn't stretch out and we can't use a motor or troll when we fish. With my precious princesses aboard (we all wear life vests at ALL TIMES), I think every measure towards stability is a good idea.
Trying to get it all in one package is tough. A sailing boat will have a lot of things encumbering room.....ceterboard trunk etc. you should be able to easily tow 800 lbs or more though.. Maybe you can find a traditional type open 12 to 14 ft sailer that will work well with a motor too?
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-08-2011, 18:19   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Duluth,Minnesota
Boat: Lindenberg 26 & Aloha 8.2
Posts: 984
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

I see the tube around the gunwhale of a hard dinghy as performing two functions,
1/ provide better than average protection to the mothership, 4" being plenty, 6" even better.
2/ provide good floatation high up should you get swamped,most hard dinghies have floatation under the seats and thwart so some higher up helps with stability in a swamped condition.
Thats it for me, i like hard dinghies for their slippery hulls which allow them to be a pleasure to row or sail and be easy to portage above the high tide mark without popping a roid, i dont want a damn tube dragging in the water ruining these properties, most dinghies have enough form stability for anyone who has even a half assed degree of competence. Most hard dinghies dont need mush of an outboard to move quite well either, i have a Sears Gamefisher/ Tanaka that weighs just 12lbs, its enough for me. As you can tell i value light weight.
Steve.
__________________
clockwork orange is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-08-2011, 13:42   #28
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 27
Images: 1
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

I liked the idea of using those "Big B" fenders and running a line through the center. However, the 6-inch or 8-inch x 20 inch variety cost about $35 - $40 per fender. If I go with the Attwood 6 x 20 in. eye-hook version, that's $12 per fender, but not as elegant. A viable idea but I hope there's a cheaper way.
__________________
andrewm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-08-2011, 13:48   #29
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 27
Images: 1
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

Nice idea. Elegant looking solution. However 20 ft of this material would cost over $160. I think there must be a cheaper way--I'm thinking more towards using the ethafoam/PE foam for a third of that cost or gluing an inflatable collar together and adding Halkey Roberts/Boston valves--about $100-120 cost. Let me know what you think.
__________________
andrewm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-09-2011, 23:53   #30
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Honokohau, Big Island, Hawaii
Posts: 81
Re: Walker Bay 10 DIY Stabilizer Tube

Aloha Andrewm,
I'm not sure where you stand with your decision-making, but your earlier post (#24) struck me that perhaps you are emphasizing stability at the cost of performance and fun for the needs you state. I've owned a 8'WB for 5 years and it has turned out to be a great little boat for my son to learn how to row in (by himself, mind you). I rowed someone else's with tubes and, well, it rowed like an inflatable- you add stability at the cost of rowing ease. I agree you have to be careful with any small boat fishing that you don't get too excited and all rush to one side. As for sailing a dinghy (especially in not so cold water), part of the fun is the occasional capsize. Our club runs capsize drills- it is part of learning how to sail. Make sure everyone is comfortable with what to do in a swamped boat. Consider putting floatation under the seats and tie a bailer (like a cut-out Chlorox bottle) inside the boat somewhere. Then have fun!
You stated that your family always wears life jackets (pfds). That is a great start towards safe fun boating.
__________________

__________________
Mahana is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need Help with Walker Bay Dinghy aline Construction, Maintenance & Refit 8 11-02-2012 15:19
Walker Bay Warranty: Sunburnt RIB Tubes Steve Pope Product or Service Reviews & Evaluations 48 08-09-2011 15:37



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:16.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.