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Old 13-02-2016, 13:21   #1
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Strida Bike and your Boat

Just came across an article on the Strida Canada West website of relevance to those who would consider a unique folding bike that can be kept on board for use on shore. And no, I have no financial interest here, just a satisfied customer who appreciates not only the bike, but the high quality service provided by Strida Canada West.

service provided by Strida Canada West.http://stridacanada.ca/?p=3874" target="_blank">http://stridacanada.ca/?p=3874
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Old 13-02-2016, 13:37   #2
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

I met a boater a couple years ago who had a pair of those bicycles on his boat. He showed me how they worked but didn't offer to let me ride one.


They seem like they would work well on a boat, especially the belt instead of a chain.
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Old 13-02-2016, 13:57   #3
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

We have been using these E-Twow electric scooters for a few years now to go all around the islands we visit. They weigh the same 24 lbs as the Strida bikes do.

Lots of fun and they fold up small for the dingy ride.
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Old 13-02-2016, 14:19   #4
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

The upright riding position is tiring and makes for very inefficient pedaling. To get a larger number of muscles and make riding less tiring, you need to have some forward lean when riding. You don't have to be in the full tuck position of a rider in the drop bars but can't be bolt upright. Also the bolt upright position makes for maximum air brake wind resistance when pedaling into the wind. Didn't see that the bike had any gearing. If there are none, humping the bike up a hill will be exhausting for a typical cruiser.
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Old 13-02-2016, 14:46   #5
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

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The upright riding position is tiring and makes for very inefficient pedaling. To get a larger number of muscles and make riding less tiring, you need to have some forward lean when riding. You don't have to be in the full tuck position of a rider in the drop bars but can't be bolt upright. Also the bolt upright position makes for maximum air brake wind resistance when pedaling into the wind. Didn't see that the bike had any gearing. If there are none, humping the bike up a hill will be exhausting for a typical cruiser.
You apparently have never ridden a Strida. Your claims go completely against my years of personal experience.

The past few years I've put over 7000 miles on one commuting 14 miles a day. I also have a full size touring bike and a folding mountain bike, both of which I've ridden long distance, so I have a basis for comparison. Neither conventional bike would be practical to keep on a small sailboat.

The Strida is not intended to replace a full size touring bike or a mountain bike. It's excellent however for shorter trips of a few miles. The upright position is easier on the back, more natural, and also avoids blood pressure buildup in the arms and hands that occurs with leaning forward on a conventional bike. Do you describe people who walk as "bolt upright?"

The Strida is obviously not a racing bike, so wind resistance is not really any more of a factor than for a typical cruising bike. Because of the gear ratio, going up hills, even steep ones, is not harder than with my touring bike or mountain bike. In fact, it might be easier due to its relatively light weight and excellent gear ratio, combined with high performance 100 psi tires.

Strida does offer versions with variable speeds, but the single speed is fine for going up hills. Unless you're in a big hurry, flat terrain speed is fine. Of course, you can easily do 45 mph and more going down big hills.

It's good exercise, but there's nothing intrinsically exhausting about it. If you ever get a chance to ride one, you'll see for yourself.
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Old 13-02-2016, 15:26   #6
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

Tried electric scooters ... didn't last long in salt air.
Test rode the Strida and did not find it comfortable at all.
Bought two full size Trek Districts (aluminum/carbon fibre) AT 20LBS. each with belt drive and love them, They don't corrode in salt air are very easy to pedal uphill even though they are single speed and my 5'2" 120lb. wife can carry them both easily.
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Old 13-02-2016, 15:30   #7
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

Cool.
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Old 14-02-2016, 01:22   #8
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

I went looking for a belt drive non-folding bike when my chain driven bike tore the deralier system off the wheel end because I had missed a short section of the chain when I sprayed it with WD40 and hung it out the back on the solar panel frame to sail a leg or two of a voyage. I found that belt drives are rare in Australia however the bike shop had a shaft drive job with an 8 speed Shimano hub. No chains to rust or belts to perish. Had it two years now without any problems, it is neglecting beautifully.
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Old 14-02-2016, 09:06   #9
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

Maybe for a cycling purist, but I have an old bike that allows an upright bicycling posture and a Brompton folding bike - they sell extended handlebars for exactly this reason. I have another non-folding bike that demands the "racing" position and frankly, I find that tiring, uncomfortable and unsustainable for these old bones.

No, I'm happy to pedal along inefficiently bolt upright looking like an old British village bobby, thank you very much.

Ray


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The upright riding position is tiring and makes for very inefficient pedaling. To get a larger number of muscles and make riding less tiring, you need to have some forward lean when riding. You don't have to be in the full tuck position of a rider in the drop bars but can't be bolt upright. Also the bolt upright position makes for maximum air brake wind resistance when pedaling into the wind. Didn't see that the bike had any gearing. If there are none, humping the bike up a hill will be exhausting for a typical cruiser.
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Old 14-02-2016, 09:18   #10
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

No doubt a conventional bicycle rides better than a folding one of any brand or style but just like a boat is a compromise, a "boat bicycle" must be a compromise.


I have a relatively small boat (for a cruising boat) and there's no way a standard bicycle will fit on my boat and not be in the way of doing something or be subject to salt spray. It has to be a folding bicycle (two of them) or no bicycle.
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Old 14-02-2016, 09:49   #11
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

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Originally Posted by boatpoker View Post
Tried electric scooters ... didn't last long in salt air.
Test rode the Strida and did not find it comfortable at all.
Bought two full size Trek Districts (aluminum/carbon fibre) AT 20LBS. each with belt drive and love them, They don't corrode in salt air are very easy to pedal uphill even though they are single speed and my 5'2" 120lb. wife can carry them both easily.
Sweet bike! The belt drive I heard about first here on CF, may look myself into something like this. Have a carbon frame DBR mountainbike, that could be modified into something similar. On a 35 ft boat there's not much extra room, however, so for now we just carry a go-ped. Would love have to have the mobility that comes with a real bike.
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Old 14-02-2016, 10:12   #12
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Strida Bike and your Boat

We have a strida. Used to commute to work on it (9 miles one way), don't anymore (we moved, biking is no longer convenient). Would be dripping sweat by the time I'd get to work, and would take quite a bit longer than with a normal bike. Another problem: any grade up, and belt would start slipping. Also with such tiny wheels, not terribly stable ride.

I would argue the small normal foldies would take less space and ride better. Strida is also quite expensive. I don't think it's the best bang for buck, but if you find a good deal (we didn't pay retail, found smth barely used on eBay) why not give it a try.


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Old 14-02-2016, 10:50   #13
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

I use my Dahon Boardwalk Folding Bike for rides of several miles, it is a 6 speed and does hills very well. I fold it up and it stows behind the campanion way steps on my Catalina 25.
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Old 14-02-2016, 12:08   #14
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

I have a worse problem - I have a stable of five bikes and can easily take two with me when I cast off, but how will I choose????.

After traveling with a bike to tour overseas you become handy at breaking down the bike to its frame and in 10 minutes putting it all back together.

A full sized bike isn't that large or difficult to deal with once the wheels are pulled and the handle bars turned sideways.
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Old 15-02-2016, 08:45   #15
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Re: Strida Bike and your Boat

I have a Strida onboard my vessel. I am really happy with it. Most people don't even see it hanging in the corner of the aft cabin. As mentioned previously, if you have a smaller vessel like mine, you have to compromise. The Strida is a perfect compromise. No greasy chain, all alloy, 15 seconds to fold up or down and fun to ride. Sure, you can't do 30mph. on it but do you go cruising to race bicycles? The added benefit of mine is when I go out, it is a conversation magnet. In Mexico, I get local all the time looking and inquiring about it which leads into a lot of conversation.
When I'm in a town with decent roads (50% of the time) I do at least 5 miles a day on it, whether it is for groceries or site seeing. The added benefit is that it fold so small and rolls that way, is I can take it into store eliminating the need to lock it outside and when grocery shopping, stick it under my cart.
I have people hinting that they want to try it but a lot of times some over-weight fuddy-duddy and I don't want to be without my strida.
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