Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 02-08-2011, 17:58   #1
STG
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Pacific NW
Boat: Coronado 35
Posts: 94
Stability of Livingstons vs RHIBs

I have tried to navigate through the threads as I am sure this issue has been covered repeatedly, but after a couple hours reading, I am giving up and going to throw it out there.....

I am currently looking for a new (used) dinghy for my sailboat and tossing the little 7' hard shelled boat as it is very unstable in calm water. I am looking for something used that will likely just stay on the davits and be used for a tender when at anchor. (I am mostly at dock except for overnight trips when anchoring out).

I think I could put a 9'-10' inflatable on the davits comfortably with maybe a 6-8hp motor. Here is where I run into a lack of info:

There are a lot of used Livingston boats for sale at much cheaper prices than the inflatable’s. Are the inflatable’s a lot more stable than say a double hulled Livingston? I am in Puget Sound in the PNW and it can get a little choppy out there.

As far as inflatable’s I did find numerous threads on RHIB vs. the soft hulls, and can make a choice there. I just want to compare the inflatable with hard. Preferably from someone in the PNW who has had both and knows the difference for these waters (or similar).

Are the Livingston’s a lot heavier than the RHIB's at which it would likely be too heavy for my davits? At least I wouldn't need to keep inflating it every week or so to keep it from going.......well you know.

Any tips/suggestions would be appreciated (as always).

Thanks,

Steve
__________________

__________________
STG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2011, 18:45   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
Vasco's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Toronto
Boat: CS36Merlin, "La Belle Aurore" Ben393 "Breathless"
Posts: 7,133
Re: Stability of Livingston's vs RHIB's

Many of the Livingstons I`ve seen have extended their hulls. Don`t know what the significance of this is, just an observation.
__________________

__________________
Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beneteau393/
Vasco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2011, 19:05   #3
Registered User
 
ShaunJ's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Md, USA
Posts: 430
Re: Stability of Livingston's vs RHIB's

My 7'6" Livingston Dingy is about 135#, 3 people max but they must not be too heavy. 450# is the max weight for this dink. It doesn't tow well on a long lead, I shorten it up close to the stern.
It is very stable, I can stand on the gunnel and it holds me up without taking on any water. Max HP is 5.
__________________
ShaunJ
I get knocked down...But get up again...
You're never going to keep me down....


ShaunJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2011, 19:16   #4
Marine Service Provider
 
AnchorageGuy's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Wherever the boat is!
Boat: Marine Trader 34DC
Posts: 4,618
Re: Stability of Livingston's vs RHIB's

We switched to a Livingston after years with an inflatable and we really like it. we have the 9 foot and find it very stable. Have a look, The Trawler Beach House: A New Dinghy And A Big Change
Chuck
__________________
Chesapeake Bay, ICW Hampton Roads To Key West, The Gulf Coast, The Bahamas

The Trawler Beach House
Voyages Of Sea Trek
AnchorageGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2011, 19:37   #5
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,342
Re: Stability of Livingston's vs RHIB's

Livingstons are stable for sure. I find them terribly uncomfortable as you sit on the center tunnel and have your feet in the trough. It will also beat heck out of the side of your boat compared with a RIB. If you are long term cruising the RIB wins IMHO. However, on a budget. a 10ft Livingston can be a bargain. It's a ctamaran...so you mono owners dont want one for sure... !
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2011, 19:55   #6
STG
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Pacific NW
Boat: Coronado 35
Posts: 94
Re: Stability of Livingston's vs RHIB's

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasco View Post
Many of the Livingstons I`ve seen have extended their hulls. Don`t know what the significance of this is, just an observation.
Hey Vasco, not sure what you mean by “extended their hulls”. Are you saying they added to the freeboard height? I guess I can see it, as there apparently is only about 12” above the waterline according to Livingston, and that seems low for an area with any waves.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterwayguy View Post
We switched to a Livingston after years with an inflatable and we really like it. we have the 9 foot and find it very stable. Have a look, The Trawler Beach House: A New Dinghy And A Big Change
Thanks Chuck. I read your story. That is the sort of experience I was looking for. So, you apparently had to switch due to the transom mounting. Looking back, ignoring how you would transport the boat and only going on functionality (stability, ease of movement in the water, etc.), do you think it is as good as the inflatable’s? My big concern is the low freeboard and potential for unforeseen waves. Does it do ok with a rogue 1-2’ rolling wave from a wake hitting you in the beam? The inflatable’s seem to roll with the waves ok, or worse case if running straight at them, a good spraying down. I just don't want to fill the boat.
__________________
STG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2011, 19:57   #7
STG
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Pacific NW
Boat: Coronado 35
Posts: 94
Re: Stability of Livingston's vs RHIB's

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
It's a ctamaran...so you mono owners dont want one for sure... !
Might be the one time I make an exception.
__________________
STG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2011, 13:00   #8
Registered User
 
Marksman's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kingston, Wa.
Boat: 1966 Buchan 37
Posts: 300
Re: Stability of Livingstons vs RHIBs

My experience with Livingstons and Inflatables:

Whith Livingstons, the bigger the better, we were given a 7.5 and it had only about half the stability of an 8. It was compleatly usless on the salt water, even dangerous, but an 8 foot version was much better. Even the 8 was not great with two people as you didn't pick up much boyancy untill the water was up to the tunnel. A 9 or 10 footer should be plenty stable with two passengers, and no, they don't tow well at all, they tack back and forth continuously unless you shorten up the painter greatly. They are roomy compared to a RIB and can hold a ton of groceries. Beaching is also more carefree as they don't damage easily and even if they do get beat up, the're cheap to replace (relatively speaking).

Inflatables, are very stable no matter what the size, tow in a straight line and can be made more compact when required by simply letting the air out. They do have more drag than a Livingston until up on a plane but then can attain higher speeds more safely though that's probably not something most folks would even care about. The RIB will have less windage hanging on the davits due to it's lower profile, and I think they generaly have greater weight capacity (someone correct me if I'm wrong). They are also more attractive to thieves so davits are a good place to keep them rather than simply tethered to the mothership.

My personal preference is a non infatable but given a choice between a livingston and a RIB I would take the RIB.
__________________
Fred Guy
Maelstrom
Marksman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 06:45   #9
STG
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Pacific NW
Boat: Coronado 35
Posts: 94
Re: Stability of Livingstons vs RHIBs

Thanks Marksman,

I am leaning towards the Livingston. I am going to look at a couple and perhaps buy one today. I have talked to some cruisers who have had them before too, but didn't have davits so they went with (de)flatables for storage and of course the towing ability.

I like the look and compact size (lesser length for equal stability compared to hard dink) of the inflatables for hanging off the back, but don't want the maintenance of having to keep adding air every few days to keep it rigid, not to mention the tear and abrasion risks when beaching.

In looking at Livingston's spec's, it appears you need at least a 9'-10' boat though to put 3 people in safely (let's assume one is a 250lb'er for sake of argument and the 9' is only rated at 550lbs with motor and all gear leaving only 10" freeboard. Worse for the 8' as you mentioned. The 10' boat has 12" freeboard, but sounds pretty long (not to mention the 190lbs) to hang off the back of my narrow boat (10' beam and much narrower stern). Spec's wise though it is my preference if it doesn't look too big.

Anyway, the price is right for these and I could easily get rid of it without much of a loss if I decide it doesn't work out. I'll be taking it on a two week cruise next week mostly anchoring and a lot of shore runs to the islands. We'll see how it works out.

Thanks for the info.

Steve
__________________
STG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2011, 08:47   #10
Resin Head
 
minaret's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Seattle WA
Boat: Nauticat
Posts: 7,199
Images: 52
Re: Stability of Livingstons vs RHIBs

I think Livingston's are uncomfortable and wet. They dont have enough weight capacity, freeboard, or engine capacity. And they're built really poorly, much heavier than they need to be because they're built mostly out of chop matt. Plus I used to work with the guy who owned the company and he was a real loser.
I use a 11.5 Whaler SS for towing in the islands, just got back. It's a much better boat, usually for only about twice the price. You can put a huge motor on it, I've seen them with 30's installed. I run a Tohatsu 18 and it planes with a family of four and groceries easily. Just my 2c.

11' Boston Whaler

And heres the 9' tender-

Boston Whaler 9' tender (rare)
__________________
minaret is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-09-2015, 17:40   #11
Registered User

Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5
Re: Stability of Livingston's vs RHIB's

10' extended 1 ft
livingston allows more floatation when working on the motor, quicker planeing with 4 people with my 18 hp
__________________
funset20012 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-09-2015, 06:18   #12
Senior Cruiser
 
FSMike's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Bahamas/Florida
Boat: Solaris Sunstar 36' catamaran
Posts: 2,654
Images: 5
Re: Stability of Livingstons vs RHIBs

Quote:
Originally Posted by minaret View Post
I think Livingston's are uncomfortable and wet. They dont have enough weight capacity, freeboard, or engine capacity. And they're built really poorly, much heavier than they need to be because they're built mostly out of chop matt. Plus I used to work with the guy who owned the company and he was a real loser.
------
Lmao! Minaret, tell us how you really feel!
__________________
Sail Fast Live Slow
FSMike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-09-2015, 06:30   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: W Carib
Boat: Wildcat 35, Hobie 33
Posts: 7,917
Re: Stability of Livingstons vs RHIBs

Used to have a Livingston 10' and really enjoyed it. Stable and fast with a 9.8hp. Would easily plane with several people aboard. The key downside for me is the damn things are heavy, way heavier than they could be if built differently.
__________________
belizesailor is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 30-09-2015, 05:08   #14
Moderator
 
HappyMdRSailor's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: North Mississippi
Boat: 48 Wauquiez Pilot Saloon-C22 Chrysler Sunpiper- 19 Potter-Preparing to cruise w/my girl
Posts: 5,980
Re: Stability of Livingstons vs RHIBs

Quote:
Originally Posted by minaret View Post
I think Livingston's are uncomfortable and wet. They dont have enough weight capacity, freeboard, or engine capacity. And they're built really poorly, much heavier than they need to be because they're built mostly out of chop matt. Plus I used to work with the guy who owned the company and he was a real loser.
I use a 11.5 Whaler SS for towing in the islands, just got back. It's a much better boat, usually for only about twice the price. You can put a huge motor on it, I've seen them with 30's installed. I run a Tohatsu 18 and it planes with a family of four and groceries easily. Just my 2c.

11' Boston Whaler

And heres the 9' tender-

Boston Whaler 9' tender (rare)
Awesome review minman!

No way would I ever even entertain owning a tender built by a loser!
__________________
In the harsh marine environment, something is always in need of repair...

Mai Tai's fix everything...
HappyMdRSailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-09-2015, 06:24   #15
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,577
Images: 240
Re: Stability of Livingstons vs RHIBs

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, funset.
__________________

__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:03.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.