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Old 13-02-2010, 20:10   #31
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regarding eskimo rolls

If people spent a tenth the amount of time learning to do a high brace as it takes to master an Eskimo roll, they'd find that they never really need to learn to roll a yak. The brace will keep you from ever being in an upside-down situation.

(Regardless, you must learn to do a wet exit plus a self rescue. If you can't master this simple skill combination, you should never go beyond sit-atops.)

If you feel you absolutely must learn to roll a yak, learn the sweep roll rather than the Eskimo roll. Waaaaay easier.
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Old 13-02-2010, 20:42   #32
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i use an entry level flat water kayak to traverse the water between my boat and off the beach in san diego--i also have a stearns inflatable kayak i like ot use for fun---they store well on my formosa 41--i have wide decks and a large cabin house roof i am able to use--i donot use the way expensive items--i like to not spend all my money on fancy dancy stuffies--lol--the entry level kayak is a perception swifty--new they were 300 dollars and used around 100-200..lol...just right price..built in floatation and weighs 38 pounds--even a kid can lift it..i dono tneed to use a halyard to raise it to deck for stowage....can do it by hand....very easy....
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Old 13-02-2010, 21:04   #33
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Kayaks

I agree with the eddyline kayaks. I used 2 of their 12 ft skylarks which weight only 38 lbs on my 27 ft cat. They are now going on my 44 ft cat. They are fast and much lighter than most rigid kayaks. They are shiny like fiber glass kayaks. They also have a very large cockpit for hauling groceries. These are very strong. Good luck. Chris
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Old 13-02-2010, 21:55   #34
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I've got an Advanced Elements Expedition kayak and found it to be very stable, rugged (will not puncture easily) inflates quickly, and packs down fairly small. It weighs about 42 lbs and fits into a carrying case. I am selling it ($400 anybody interested?) because my boat doesn't have room for it, and I now have an inflatable dinghy. I really enjoy inflatable kayaks though, because I like knowing that if I tip over, I can wallow back into it like a pool toy. And I think the Advanced Elements kayaks are well made-- especially for the price. Info on them here:
Inflatable Kayaks | AdvancedFrame Kayak
I think it is good to try one out before purchasing, because individual body types and comfort are subjective. Good luck.
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Old 13-02-2010, 23:38   #35
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There are some photos I took of us unpacking our new 'toy' and a short video clip I took of us pedalling it in this post:
2 Gringos in the Caribbean: A new toy.

That will give you an idea of how the Hobie comes shipped to you, how big it is folded, and how fast those danged Mirage drives are, if you are interested in them.
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Old 13-02-2010, 23:46   #36
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I can vouch for Canibul's comment on how fast the Mirage drives are. My partner has a hobie inflatable with the pedal drive, and he literally does circles around me. Sometimes he even tows me when I get tired. Claims he can hardly feel the difference. Also they are so stable he can move fore or aft on it without tipping. They are quite pricey tho.
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Old 13-02-2010, 23:51   #37
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That Dooley is a cutie. Kind of a calico (don't tell him I said that). Nice to see the boat in action. It looks like fun.
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Old 14-02-2010, 12:18   #38
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yeah, he's a hoot. Goes nuts around fish. Has jumped overboard in 2,000 ft. of water going after barracuda, for example. He likes to bite them. If you like Dooley, there is another little movie here with him watching sharks....and more apropos, this is more images of the inflatable kayak and the kind of rocks we use it in every week.

2 Gringos in the Caribbean: Playing with sharks

And what Dramanaut says is true. We can peddle the Mirage Drives hour after hour. It's like riding a comfy beach bike, you can basically keep it up all day if you want, and are in even halfway okay shape. You can make headway against wind and current that you wouldn't want to try with just a paddle. Paddles catch wind, the drives don't. I can't see us ever going back to paddles only, unless we got back into white water stuff again someday.
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Old 14-02-2010, 12:34   #39
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I love my Hobie i12s. Inflatables are often rather leisurely, but this thing zips along quite surprisingly. It's also comfortable for a big guy with a back back; I can crawl from bow to stern, stretch out for a rest, and even (with a bit of care) stand up!

Here are "the girls" that we carried aboard Nomadness on a 2008 cruise. The Advanced Elements is the one that Sky is selling, and the dink is a Gig Harbor 10' Navigator with inflatable Dinghy Dogs and forward-rowing system.
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Old 16-02-2010, 17:14   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ram View Post
wow those Hobie i14t inflatable s are ery expensie around $2500 seems like thats oer the top for something like this
Well I guess the answer is, "Yes, they are expensive", but I don't know of another kayak that will meet these requirements.
  • Folds up
  • Stores in the boat, not on deck
  • Magic Drive (is way less tiring, better exercise)
  • Pedal or paddle
  • Sails
  • Can be used by 1 or 2
  • Big enough for a tall guy (6' 2")
  • Fun!

I'm with Canibul on this one.

Fair Winds,
Mike
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Old 16-02-2010, 18:11   #41
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Surely someone has had to try one of these?





For the record, the Ocean Kayak Sit on Top's are an easy sub $1000 choice. Stable and durable.
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Old 16-02-2010, 18:41   #42
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Re the Hobie price... yes, it's a trade-off. It's a little annoying having a kayak that I'm not comfortable leaving unattended on a beach; I have the same problem with a fancy dinghy, and it restricts freedom. There's a lot to be said for a "beater boat," especially if you have room for both!

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Old 17-02-2010, 05:03   #43
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When we decided on the i14t, we were thinking of several attributes that made it worth the money for us. We have a 25 ft. center console power boat, and like to explore places where the water is too shallow for the deep v hull. The Hobie fits on board, no problem. We have two Land Rover Defenders as vehicles, and the Hobie fits in the back of those, no problem. When we find the right Gemini 105 to buy, the Hobie will fit below on one of the spare bunks, no problem.

Now, at the time we bought this I was lusting after the Hobie Adventure Island trimaran. The problem with those, for us as a couple, is that they were solo. I would have had to buy two of them. I looked into fabricating a rack for the ragtop Land Rover, but it was going to be a lot of money, and a hassle, and two sixteen foot rigid boats....yadda yadda....we bought the inflatable tandem. And we have not regretted it for a second. We love the boat.

Now, Hobie has come out with a tandem version of the Adventure Island, and I am still considering buying one of those as a beach sailor for the two of us, and leave the inflatable on the sailboat permanently.

And while that Triak looks really fun, I gotta tell you, a Hobie Mirage drive will eat it's lunch if it's being paddled. I have some questions about visibility with that sail setup, but I figure they will be addressing that.

The Mirage Drives really are incredible. You can go all day long, as easy or hard as you want to make it. And the i14t is the most comfy kayak I have ever been on. I am six two, 230 lbs. And I can sprawl out across the thing if I want to. La Gringa Suprema is five eleven, and the two of us, a cooler, and a dog do not faze this boat. We have stuff in the bow locker, even. And room for a little more, if needed. I know I could take a nap in it. by just unhooking the seat straps and laying back. It goes fine with either person pedalling, and really scoots when both are cranking. I justified buying for knee rehab after a total replacement back in April, and it has been fantastic exercise.
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Old 17-02-2010, 10:29   #44
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Canibul - well said! I'm in love with my i12s as well, for all the same reasons. I have even towed my partner when she tires of paddling, and I don't even slow down. I, too, lusted after the AI, but the practicality is what stopped me... I already have one micro-trimaran, the product of a decade's work (pictured below), that I don't know how to carry aboard my monohull!

In a side note, my old Fulmar-19 trimaran went to Turks & Caicos back in the '90s... wonder if you ever ran across it there?
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Old 17-02-2010, 11:15   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canibul View Post
...
And while that Triak looks really fun, I gotta tell you, a Hobie Mirage drive will eat it's lunch if it's being paddled. I have some questions about visibility with that sail setup, but I figure they will be addressing that.

The Mirage Drives really are incredible. You can go all day long, as easy or hard as you want to make it....
I have the Adventure Island and my experience with the Mirage Drives seems a little different than your's. I like the Drives and believe they produce more power/torque than possible with the paddles. However for speed, in calm conditions, I can push the boat much faster paddling than pedaling.
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