Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 24-04-2008, 20:56   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Nashville, TN
Boat: Islander, MK II, 30' Sloop
Posts: 4
Arrow Fiberglass Dinghy Stowed Solidly on Foredeck is Best;

Hi; I'm a new member here so if this doesn't get posted right, then bear with me. We cruised for 8 years with a small, light but strong fiberglass dinghy that bolted into custom chocks, partly over the forward hatch and tilted downward to the fore deck. We used 3 large thumb bolts, that were screwed down into the chock by hand. The dinghy was light enough and small enough that we could easily pull it up, over the life line and onto the fore deck, even in moderate winds and waves. We called the dinghy "Me Too ! ", can you guess why ? This set-up worked a 1,000 times better than aft davits, or tying it down on deck, or deflating it every time, etc. What do you think? Bernie.
__________________

__________________
Bernie Eskesen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-04-2008, 21:13   #2
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Nevada City. CA
Boat: Sceptre 41
Posts: 3,745
Images: 9
Sounds like a pretty nice system. I'm looking for a fiberglass dinghy but they are hard to find at a reasonable price. I like the solid chocks and thumb screws.
__________________

__________________
Fair Winds,

Charlie

Between us there was, as I have already said somewhere, the bond of the sea. Besides holding our hearts together through long periods of separation, it had the effect of making us tolerant of each other's yarns -- and even convictions. Heart of Darkness
Joseph Conrad
Charlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-04-2008, 07:35   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Nashville, TN
Boat: Islander, MK II, 30' Sloop
Posts: 4
Hi Charlie; I think the brand of my fiberglass light weight dinghy is a ? "Livingston" ? and maybe it's mfr'd in the Seattle, WA area or ?? It has been around _many_ years so I don't know if they still make them. It was very, very "boxy", but very, very functional. Length = about 7' 4" or so & about 4' wide. It's hull is shaped like a little minature pontoon boat, one sits on the "deck-like" area in the middle. Regular oars stow in side very nicely on custome made chocks, (keeps them off deck and out of the cabin !!!). Of course, a small outboard mounts nicely on the transom. We took it everywhere, it was INVALUABLE !!!, we explored LOTS of nooks and crannies with it. Good Luck finding one. If you need more details, I can photo is from 3 angles. Bernie "Alansa"
__________________
Bernie Eskesen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-04-2008, 08:29   #4
Sponsoring Vendor

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Milton, Ontario
Boat: still dreaming...getting close...
Posts: 192
Hard chocks are great for ensuring a solid, secure mounting position. There are some very good products on the market that have built-on cleats and are removable for when they're not being used. Also, corrosion resistance is important because there is a lot of spray up on deck.
__________________
Atkins & Hoyle Ltd. Over 40 years of Marine Innovation, Quality and Craftsmanship
Davits, Hatches, Ports, Hatch Repairs, Motor Lifts, Arches/Hardtops and Custom Designs www.AtkinsHoyle.com |atkinshoyle@dapa.com
Benjamaphone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-04-2008, 08:51   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: North Carolina
Boat: 44 footer
Posts: 923
Bernie,

Sounds like a great idea.

I'd love to see a picture.
__________________
Zach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-04-2008, 10:03   #6
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zach View Post
Bernie,

Sounds like a great idea.

I'd love to see a picture.

Me too, especially on a 30 footer
David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-04-2008, 12:17   #7
Eternal Member
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Las Brisas Panama AGAIN!
Boat: Simpson, Catamaran, 46ft. IMAGINE
Posts: 4,508
Images: 123
There was a fella in the marina that built a nesting dinghy to fit over his hatch to save space. He also used the mast from a wind surfer to power the thing. I don't know if it would take a motor too, or not.
__________________
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-04-2008, 16:40   #8
Registered User
 
Squeaks's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oxnard / Alameda, CA
Boat: Golden Gate 30, Westerly 23
Posts: 169
Images: 3
I have been pondering the dinghy delema for a very long time. As I don't want an outboard, inflatables are out. As stated in another post I really wanted a Portland Pudgy to stow upside down on my foredeck but at 128lbs I can't carry that much weight. I think the Livingston might also be too heavy for me. So, what I am building (I got the ply last night) is an Eastport Pram - 7ft,8in, 48in beam, 55lbs. I found a f/g windsurfer mast and will make a sail rig. There's building info at the Chesapeake Light Craft website and a couple of other sites. I'll be happy to share what I learn. Dinghys, especially on small boats, are a challenge!
PS - Larry Pardee, last weekend, gave me pause to consider that the dinghy over the foredeck hatch could be very dangerous if blocking an exit during a galley fire - something to think about!
__________________
We can't change the wind - but we can adjust our sails.
Squeaks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-04-2008, 02:26   #9
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeaks View Post
. I'll be happy to share what I learn. Dinghys, especially on small boats, are a challenge!
Would be interested to see how the dink turns and especially on board a smaller boat.
David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-04-2008, 17:36   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: North Carolina
Boat: 44 footer
Posts: 923
I'm building a phil bolger tortoise. (Actually starting over, mis-under-estimated the required number of clamps before nailing and gluing... then again I'm a perfectionist.)

Measured the space on my cabintop, and its one of the few that would fit between the hand rails, boom vang, boom, and not overlap all the sliding companionway hatch.

(No idea on how well they work as boats, but for the space I've got it looks about right! Price was right too... plans are in Dynamite Paysons book!)
__________________
Zach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-04-2008, 18:47   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3
We just bought a Cheoy Lee 32 ketch that the P/O had rigged with a lifting spar that stows against the mizzen when not in use. To launch the dinghy (fiberglass, stowed on top of the cabin roof) raise it with the spar and as you are swinging it out over the lifeline a line attached to the oarlock causes the dinghy to flip right side up. Truly amazing! And the dinghy is secured to the chocks with padded lines, covered with matching sunbrella, tied to wooden cleats. No corrosion, no sweat.
__________________
experiment is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-04-2008, 18:53   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Melbourne, Florida
Boat: 1995 CATALINA 320 (missing my catamaran)
Posts: 190
Send a message via Skype™ to SurfNRG
I'd also like to see photo's of this set-up..,
__________________
SurfNRG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-04-2008, 15:27   #13
Senior Cruiser
 
SkiprJohn's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kea'au, Big Island, Hawaii
Boat: Cascade, Sloop, 42 - "Casual"
Posts: 14,192
Experiment,
That's exactly the way I used to do it when by myself. Works great! I described the flipping part about 2 years ago on the forum. Do you use the spar on the mainmast or the mizzen mast?
El Toro plans are still available for $25. A Naples Sabot is also a good dinghy. Can be made of ply or glass. The lighter ply makes a very light boat. Depending on how you frame it it could be as light as 50lbs.
JohnL
__________________
SkiprJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-04-2008, 17:38   #14
Registered User
 
jim lee's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Anacortes, WA
Boat: J/35 - No Tomorrows
Posts: 180
Images: 3
Umm.. Another option perhaps?

We build a 80 - 85 lb dingy. Its from a Sabot mold.

Here's a thread about it with a picture of Hull #1.

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...ers-13171.html

-jim lee
__________________
J/35 No Tomorrows
jim lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-04-2008, 20:28   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3
The lifting pole is on the forward face of the mizzen. The P/O built it out of an old self-tending jib boom. They're both made of spruce so it looks pretty good. Next time we go out and use it we'll take some photos for the board.
__________________

__________________
experiment is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fiberglass

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trampoline Vs. Solid Foredeck Ex-Calif Multihull Sailboats 39 21-03-2009 16:51
Kevlar over fiberglass sneuman Construction, Maintenance & Refit 4 28-01-2007 23:44
conveniently stowed nylon plait anchor rode Rick Anchoring & Mooring 17 31-12-2006 21:59
Dinghy on foredeck? Pros & Cons chuckiebits Seamanship & Boat Handling 15 20-06-2006 16:38
fiberglass captjohn360 Construction, Maintenance & Refit 1 20-11-2004 19:10



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:10.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.