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Old 31-08-2010, 15:51   #16
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That's exactly what I'm talking about. Rowing the RIB. It can be done, but it's a slow painful process.
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Old 31-08-2010, 16:03   #17
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I have always used hard dinghies, row them, and make my own.
They tend to walk from the foreshore around here.
Sometimes they are recovered with a few used syringes inside.

The key to a dinghy that rows well with a load is rocker, the more the better.
Once you start dragging the transom through the water, rowing becomes a chore rather than a pleasure.

My current favorite design is an 8' Bolger Nymph with the bottom widened by 6", but the earlier Elegant Punt, widened also by 6" on the bottom, is a genuine weekend project and rows surprisingly well.
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Old 31-08-2010, 16:29   #18
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I really like a hard dingy. I would say I like the deflateable for being able to deflate and stow.. but really that is rare. Where I do like the deflateable is when the conditions are really rough. One night in the Bahamas I might not have made it back to the boat in a hard dingy...

Inland waters? Coastal Cruising? Oh yea, something that rows is nice.
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Old 31-08-2010, 19:36   #19
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bolger nymph. I HATE THE BOLGER NYMPH! one winter i decided to build a boat, and, being all thumbs, i picked the simplest - the bolger nymph. it really was simple to build. then i tried to actually use it. my surfboard is more stable than a bolger nymph. and that's with one person. with two it was like a kamikaze dinghy.

i've noticed that bolger subsequently modified it to be much wider, and presumably, more stable - think he called it the pregnant nymph or something like that.
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Old 31-08-2010, 19:43   #20
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He made it 12" wider, my ones are 6" wider so they fit in an 8' x 4' space.
No issues with stability, it increases with loading.

It has carried 300kg (2 men, 2 women) over 300 yards to the boat in calm water, felt solid and rowed well.
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Old 31-08-2010, 20:42   #21
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How far do you need to row?

How far do you need to row? An inflatable should be fine over short distances but the proverbial PITN for anything further.

We initially brought an inflatable (Achilles with 5hp) and it's a good tender but even though it's made of hypalon I thought it wouldn't last being dragged from rack to water and vice versa so it's stored at home until needed.

So we got a 9' aluminium dinghy. At about 30kg it's too heavy for me to handle by myself. For two it's great. Rows well.

I also brought a 6'6" fibreglass pram for when it's just me. At about 22kg it's still heavy, it's got no real stability compared with the 9' alloy, and the freeboard and the buoyancy are in the wrong place for more than one person.

The 5hp 2 stroke is too heavy when it has to be manhandled, and it's not big enough to drive the 9' boat quickly anyway, and it's too big for the small pram. I should have gone with the lightest available 2 stroke (about 2.2hp).

I found a pair of old oars in a dumpster that have been great for the little pram with a little patching. I had to make extra long oars for the tinnie myself as all the commercially available oars are too short. I should have brought the fancy rowlocks as the cheap ones are a PITA.

I dream of a "take apart" 15kg foam/carbon fibre 8'*4.5' catamaran. I'll make it one day, but I have a boat to "finish" first.
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Old 31-08-2010, 20:56   #22
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I've thought about down/side grading also. When I bought my RIB I thought it was the best thing since sliced bread, but it is heavy both in the water and on the davits. I have it stern mounted and it is too heavy compared to the soft inflatable it replaced. I've looked at the hard dinghies being able to sail would be a feature.
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Old 01-09-2010, 12:44   #23
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I don't plan on rowing too far...but if I had something that was actually rowable that may change. On the other hand I can't plan just how from the mothership I'll be when the engine decides to act up and I'm forced to row.

Really liking that Watertender! It's a about the same size as my RIB, but much more room inside. Even new, I could probably get enough for the inflatable to pay for it and then some. And it's conveniently rated for 5HP, same as my old 2 stroke...if I can get it running.
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Old 01-09-2010, 12:48   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capn_billl View Post
When I bought my RIB I thought it was the best thing since sliced bread, but it is heavy both in the water and on the davits.
I think everyone did. I wanted a zodiac for years. Even looked at larger one, before the mothership was even a thought, just to use around here as a small dive boat.

The other thing is, on my boat, it rubs against my rails, and sometimes even the back stays. Even if I haul it up as far as it will go, the stern is still going to rub the rail. That's not doing much for the life expectancy of the RIB.
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Old 01-09-2010, 13:45   #25
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I have a Livingston 8' hard bottom dink. it is a tunnelhull design like the Boston Whaler. Very stable and dry ride.
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Old 03-09-2010, 10:45   #26
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grainofsand - i've heard of the livingston dinghy

but apparently its a 'left coast' but and almost unknown here in the east. i've never actually seen one either on someone's boat or offered for sale.

still, i've heard that they're well built and more seaworthy than my current hard dink (watertender 9.4) and i'd sure like to at least look at one. the only dealer i know of is in maryland and i'm in florida.

what can you tell us about the livingston??
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Old 03-09-2010, 11:05   #27
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That's strange considering they're based in NC.
I sent them an email to find out if any dealers will be at the Annapolis show.

On the other hand, hard to pass up a used water tender with a 3HP for only $350!
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Old 03-09-2010, 11:11   #28
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Livingston Boats is part of The Power Cat Group which has offices on both coast. Chuck
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Old 03-09-2010, 12:05   #29
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Maybe the solution is to get a bigger rubber "dinghy" with big, powerful oars and leave the boat at home.




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Old 03-09-2010, 12:33   #30
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No that's a diving inflatable! May be though to get on the davits, though.
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