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View Poll Results: What kind of dinghy/tender do you cruise with?
Inflatable. (Rigid bottom, inflatable bottom, etc.) 161 54.58%
Hard Dinghy. (Fiberglass, plastic, etc.) 86 29.15%
Folding dinghy. 29 9.83%
Nesting dinghy. 19 6.44%
Voters: 295. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 16-06-2007, 04:40   #106
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I suspected as much. Thanks, John.
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Old 21-06-2007, 11:48   #107
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UK-based Gibbs Technologies, manufacturer of the Aquada amphibious car, said in a statement that it is forming three companies in the US to manufacture and market its amphibious vehicles. Two production-ready vehicles planned for introduction in the US in 2009 were displayed at a news conference last week.

Besides the Aquada amphibious car, Gibbs has introduced the Quadski, an all-terrain vehicle that is shaped like a personal watercraft with wheels. The Aquada will be marketed by Gibbs Amphibians and the Quadski will be marketed by Gibbs Sports Amphibians.

Gibbs Military Amphibians will have responsibility for the development of high-speed amphibians for military use under an agreement with Lockheed Martin. Gibbs and Lockheed Martin plan to unveil several military concept vehicles based on Gibbs' patented technology later this summer. The company has a military model called the Humdinga.

The company is considering manufacturing plants in states that include Georgia, Virginia, Michigan and Texas, according to Alan Gibbs, the firm's founder and chairman. "We expect to begin new-model production in North America late next year," he said in the statement. Gibbs said that the company expects to employ more than 1,500 within three years. "Our plans for North America are ambitious, aggressive and achievable," he added. "Our market research indicates that a line-up of high-speed amphibious vehicles similar to the Aquada could generate annual sales volumes of 100,000 or more within five years."

The Aquada and Quadski were developed at a cost of more than $100 million. Initial design work on the Aquada began in Detroit in 1997 with a team of more than 20 engineers. Product development later transferred to Coventry in the UK, where the company used motorsports, aerospace and OEM engineers. More than one million man hours have gone into the development of the company's technology.

Prototype amphibians have traveled at speeds of more than 110 mph on land and 45 mph on water, according to the statement.

"Although Quadski and Aquada will be among the first products introduced with our HSA technology, we're actively exploring a variety of other commercial and military applications," said Gibbs.
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Old 07-08-2007, 12:55   #108
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For those interested in an 8' hard dinghy that isn't overly expensive, you might want to look here:

Gig Harbor Boat Works - 8' Nisqually

Base price is $1100 USD.

I've seen these at boat shows and the quality was fine.

They have 9.5' version too. I have a roll up Avon, and have thought of getting this one as a second dinghy. Instead for now we have a 9' plastic kayak.
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Old 28-10-2007, 13:43   #109
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Those are nice boats, Hiracer. I visited Gig Harbor's shop last week, and just yesterday confirmed my purchase of a kevlar 10' Navigator with forward-facing rowing system, high-performance sail rig, dinghy dogs for those times when I really want the stability of an inflatable, kick-up rudder, davit lifting points, and stainless keel strip. Can't wait...

That will be the workboat for the mothership, but I also love having a kayak on board. At the moment it's my much-loved Hobie Revolution with sail and outriggers (Sidekicks), though that's now a bit redundant in some ways so I'm selling it to buy their new i12s inflatable (still with the Mirage pedal drive). It's hard to beat the speed and agility of a kayak when you just want to go play, and the Mirage drive is wonderful compared to paddling.

Cheers,
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Old 29-10-2007, 11:53   #110
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Steve:

Let me know how the inflatable kayak works out. I've always suspected those things of getting pushed around by the wind, like a dinghy.

I'm sure you will like your Gig Harbor boat. They make good stuff. I'm still trying to figure out how to get one on my smaller sailboat. It's a squeeze, especially with a rigid vang. Gonna have to go forward of the mast. Dicy.

I saw a gal row an 8 footer this summer in the Gulf Islands, and it sure seemed to me like she was moving fine. Didn't have the forward facing setup, however.

Just this last weekend we were rowing the 8' Avon. Without the benefit of a motor, man those things are an abortion.

This winter is the year of the spinniker pole and related hardwear. Next winter will be the year of the hard dinghy.

Enjoy.
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Old 31-10-2007, 21:53   #111
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Hiracer...

I'm looking forward to the i12s - I really loved my trusty old Bubba (an Aire Sea Tiger 19' inflatable); modern well-made inflatables are very capable and rugged. I put that one through all kinds of abuse and never had a problem.

Stowage of the 10' dink will be challenging on my 44 also, though for coastal use I'll just use the davits. I'll probably have to add some saddles to the foredeck for offshore use; fortunately the headsail is high-cut and there is clearance around the hatches. It might actually be a good spot for a deck box for other large clutter that would rarely need to be accessible offshore (crab trap, folding bicycle, redneck bow-thruster, etc).

The forward rowing system is a complete leap of faith, which is not really my style... but it looks pretty convincing and the hardware appears robust (saw it in the flesh but did not get to try it). Should know sometime in the next week! My last dink was an AMI inflatable (soft floor) that I got for my Corsair 36; it was nice to be able to easily drag it up on one of the nets but I didn't much enjoy rowing it (and never tried in nasty conditions). Still, it was stable for such things as going to the fuel docks and hauling gear, and it will feel good to have the removable flotation collar for the new one.

I need a spinnaker pole also... the boat came with a chute and all rigging (including mast fixtures), but the pole disappeared along the way.

Cheers!
Steve
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Old 28-11-2007, 16:07   #112
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I just found out that Gig Harbor Boat Works will do a custom nesting arrangment with many of their dinghies.

I'm now thinking of stepping up to a 10' Navigator model as a nestor, albeit putting it together on deck might not be a possibility without unhooking the staysail stay. The 8' Nisqually will fit on my boat on the foredeck, and nested I can put her behind the mast should I chose, so I'm torn about which way to go. The 8 footer fits the boat better with more storage options--especially the unnested storage--but the 10 footer will handle the water better.

Keeping the Avon and 2-stroke Yammy in any case.

BTY, I scored a used spin pole at Second Wave in Fremont. The used pole was such a savings over new that I got money left over this boat show season for a hard dinghy.

Steve, be sure to let me know how the Navigator rows after you get it. I'm definitely in the hunt.
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Old 28-11-2007, 16:42   #113
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Hiracer,

I found this and if I had a need would probably check it out.

For Sale: Walker Bay 8 Dinghy. The Walker Bay is a rigid dinghy that can be rowed, motored or sailed. It is light (71 lbs.), fits perfectly in the Gemini davits and makes a great dinghy for the Gemini. I have four of them for sale; 3 as new and 1 used but in very good condition.All include the sailing rig. Cost $1,350.00 new; sell for $450. each or $1500. for all four. Detroit area. Call Gary at 586-201-2600. [FONT='Arial','sans-serif'](9/08/07)[/font]


I have no idea who it is or why it is up. It has been up a while I think.
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Old 28-11-2007, 16:45   #114
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Thanks for the thought. I'm not in the Detroit area, but I have seen Walker Bays for sale in my area for the same price. Just last week, in fact.

I appreciate your kindness, but I must confess that's not the boat for me.
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Old 28-11-2007, 16:49   #115
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I guess I thought they cost more.

Best of luck.
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Old 29-11-2007, 01:16   #116
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Hiracer...

Good job on the spin pole; I'm jealous! My boat came with spinnaker, track, rigging... but no pole. <sigh> The shopping list is still pretty intimidating (new autopilot, SSB, new chartplotter, on and on....)

Anyway, the Navigator with forward-rowing system is great! I was pleasantly surprised during a jaunt around Gig Harbor, and think it will do well. It pushes my geek buttons, is surprisingly easy to use, and feels good. I have not tried the sail yet.

If you're ever up Camano-way, give me a holler - maybe we can splash the dink and you can give the rowing rig a try.

Cheers,
Steve
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Old 20-02-2008, 04:04   #117
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Most experience is with 8ft fibreglass dinghy, robust, good rowing, no-one pinched it, but couldn't dive from it. Recently charted a Perry 43 with a 9ft RIB which was great in the circumstances, but seemed heavy, and was impossible to row any distance. This time round I am thinking hard, with one of the inflatable dive kayaks. Would seem to give the best of both worlds. Anyone had any experience with these things?
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Old 20-02-2008, 12:18   #118
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We currently have, in addition to our Avon, one of those 9' plastic kayaks. It works great, but getting in and out of the kayak at the boat can be an issue if the anchorage is rolly and the inflatable is not available to use as an ingress/egress platform. I would imagine that the dive kayak versions are better, as you sit on the kayak instead of in it. But I would not want a dive kayak for cold water use.

[Edit: Oops, was thinking about the plastic dive kayaks when I posted. I have not seen the inflatable dive kayaks. I've seen inflatable kayaks, but not inflatable dive kayaks.]
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Old 21-02-2008, 02:09   #119
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Thanks John, The inflatable dive kayaks I have seen on the web have a 'flap' in the floor that allows entry and exit from the bottom of the boat. I haven't seen one in real life yet! Theory seems ok for entry, but not sure how easy entry would be given the stability of the kayak I would imagine to be much less than an inflatible, maybe i should ask the question on a dive forum, glenn
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Old 01-03-2008, 12:18   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn C View Post
Most experience is with 8ft fibreglass dinghy, robust, good rowing, no-one pinched it, but couldn't dive from it. Recently charted a Perry 43 with a 9ft RIB which was great in the circumstances, but seemed heavy, and was impossible to row any distance. This time round I am thinking hard, with one of the inflatable dive kayaks. Would seem to give the best of both worlds. Anyone had any experience with these things?

What was your impression of the Perry?
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