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Old 05-11-2015, 09:07   #61
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Re: Using a Milwaukee 28v drill on a manual windlass

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Originally Posted by smj View Post
I think the "flipping" the operator was referring to what the Milwaukee drill would do if the drill bit were to bind up completely. Having worked with the Milwaukee's 110v right angle drill for many years I can guarantee there is no man that can match the torque of that drill and would wind up flat on his ass if he tried!


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You read that right. It is hard to get off the trigger fast enough. And Jim I somewhat disagree. If you snag something on the bottom unexpectedly, wreck, power cable or whatever?
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Old 05-11-2015, 11:32   #62
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Re: Using a Milwaukee 28v drill on a manual windlass

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You would still need access for swapping the batteries out but something as simple as a small cable tied around the trigger and lead back on deck could operate the drill. Pull on the cable and it pulls the trigger. Release the cable and the drill turns off. (I assume the trigger isn't one of those where you have to push a button before the trigger can be pulled)
I traveled in a boat on the river in Hue, Viet Nam and the throttle control was a bit of fishing mono filiment line tied onto the sprung engine throttle lever and coming out a small hole in the wheel house floor. The skipper pulled the string and jammed a tapered wooden cone like a spinning top into the hole to set the revs. I'm sure a Vietnamese boatman would take 5 minutes to adapt the luxury of a power drill to an anchor winch.
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Old 05-11-2015, 12:23   #63
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Re: Using a Milwaukee 28v drill on a manual windlass

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I traveled in a boat on the river in Hue, Viet Nam and the throttle control was a bit of fishing mono filiment line tied onto the sprung engine throttle lever and coming out a small hole in the wheel house floor. The skipper pulled the string and jammed a tapered wooden cone like a spinning top into the hole to set the revs. I'm sure a Vietnamese boatman would take 5 minutes to adapt the luxury of a power drill to an anchor winch.

Now that's what I'm talking about, a little ingenuity! Who needs a stinkin high dollar Morse control?


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Old 05-11-2015, 12:59   #64
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Re: Using a Milwaukee 28v drill on a manual windlass

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Now that's what I'm talking about, a little ingenuity! Who needs a stinkin high dollar Morse control?


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There was a time in New Zealand after WW2, when we had import restrictions and we often had to make our own things. That led to a lot of ingenuity. The Hamilton Jet boat first developed in the 1950s by a farmer was an example of that ingenuity. We also had Richard Pearce who may or may not have flown before the Wright Brothers. He certainly made some planes one of which is being copied to see if it will fly.

Places like Viet Nam now have very ingenious people who can't afford or can't access expensive equipment.

Now in NZ as in most "developed"countries younger people are more interested in iPhones and Apps. I have apps too but I still make a lot of my own things.
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Old 05-11-2015, 13:38   #65
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Re: Using a Milwaukee 28v drill on a manual windlass

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Jim, of course we also need to maintain our anchor winches. I'm sure you do.

I overlooked greasing some bit and my windlass stopped working. Anyway I took it to the factory and they told me I should have removed the drum and greased it every year at least and it does say that in the instructions. (I know what to do now when it's in front of me)

All I'm saying is that I'm sure lots of people run their winches or windlasses until they break.

They are of course not only doused in salt spray but also abrasive sand and mud.
A little dismantling cleaning and greasing or oil top up if necessary every year at least should make them last. I make sure I do that now.
Graham, let me make this clear: the S/L Hyspeed failed when internal parts broke from overstress, not from any lack of maintenance. The overstress was attempting to lift my 45 lb anchor and the smaller anchor of a French boat who had laid his over mine. This is the sort of thing that happens in the real world, and which your anchor gear needs to be able to handle without breaking.

The Maxwell sprague clutches failed when some water got past the NON-REPLACEABLE shaft seals and caused corrosion. The manual said that the internal lube was permanent. There was no drain nor fill access for renewing the lubricant.

Neither of these failures were due to poor maintenance.

The first VCW failure was due to poor design... no seal on the mainshaft which allows water to run down into the aluminium housing mentioned. There was a weep hole, about 3 mm in diameter, which was supposed to drain off any water that entered. It didn't, and the resulting corrosion, working from the inside outwards and thus invisible to the operator finally caused the failure. The second VCW had a shaft seal and a redesigned part between the deck casting and the gearbox... much better. The gear failure was likely due to the overload that I described, although the time delay between the incident and the failure makes the connection a bit suspect. This failure is clearly due to inappropriate usage, ie operator error, but of a sort that is not exceptional in the real world. But NOT due to poor maintenance.

Once again, the point of my post was that manual windlasses are not a panacea of reliability, indestructible and eternal, and that electrical windlasses don't always fail due to electrical faults, and in fact are similarly reliable to their manual brethren, both being installed and maintained to recommended specifications.

I'll jump down off my soapbox now...

Jim
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Old 05-11-2015, 16:30   #66
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Re: Using a Milwaukee 28v drill on a manual windlass

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Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Graham, let me make this clear: the S/L Hyspeed failed when internal parts broke from overstress, not from any lack of maintenance. The overstress was attempting to lift my 45 lb anchor and the smaller anchor of a French boat who had laid his over mine. This is the sort of thing that happens in the real world, and which your anchor gear needs to be able to handle without breaking.

The Maxwell sprague clutches failed when some water got past the NON-REPLACEABLE shaft seals and caused corrosion. The manual said that the internal lube was permanent. There was no drain nor fill access for renewing the lubricant.

Neither of these failures were due to poor maintenance.

The first VCW failure was due to poor design... no seal on the mainshaft which allows water to run down into the aluminium housing mentioned. There was a weep hole, about 3 mm in diameter, which was supposed to drain off any water that entered. It didn't, and the resulting corrosion, working from the inside outwards and thus invisible to the operator finally caused the failure. The second VCW had a shaft seal and a redesigned part between the deck casting and the gearbox... much better. The gear failure was likely due to the overload that I described, although the time delay between the incident and the failure makes the connection a bit suspect. This failure is clearly due to inappropriate usage, ie operator error, but of a sort that is not exceptional in the real world. But NOT due to poor maintenance.

Once again, the point of my post was that manual windlasses are not a panacea of reliability, indestructible and eternal, and that electrical windlasses don't always fail due to electrical faults, and in fact are similarly reliable to their manual brethren, both being installed and maintained to recommended specifications.

I'll jump down off my soapbox now...

Jim
Quite so Jim. I wrote that "I'm sure you do" maintain your winch but some don't.
We all live in "the real world"
When Captain Cook had anchor problems in Tahiti, he cut it loose and it was recovered around 1988 or so.
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