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Old 24-02-2008, 22:38   #1
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Traveler question: Pin Stops

Hi Guys,

I was talking with a friend about revamping the traveler on my Triton. The mainsheet hooks to the end of the boom. Traveler is on the aft edge of the cockpit.

She brought up using pin stops instead of blocks and line to locate the main sheet car. I'm having a bit of trouble tracking down such beasties. In light air grab the mainsheet and slide the car one way or the other, pull the pin and move the pin stop and its set to a new spot. Bigger gusts, set the stop for the next tack where you want it...

In any event, I'm seeking advice for improving my current setup which is a 3:1 with two clam cleats mounted just in front of the traveler on the back wall of the cockpit. Pull up and push away from you to move the traveler towards you, pull to move away. Two stopper knots are used, and the line is continuous and runs through the blocks, through the car, down through the cleats on each side.

The clam cleats aren't my first choice, as when I first bought the boat a strong breeze on a broad reach would yank the line through the worn out cleats and occasionally send the boat on an accidental gybe. It hasn't happened since I replaced the line and cleats with new... but I am still not comfortable with it and want a bullet proof system for going cruising.

Thanks for the suggestions and thoughts guys!

Zach
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Old 25-02-2008, 03:27   #2
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Google Harken or Schaefer adjustable pinstop track or pinstop car.
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Old 25-02-2008, 03:55   #3
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Pin stops suck. Just when you need to be looking forward or aloft, you have to turn round, let go the wheel and use both hands to wrench the friggin stuck pin. Then the traveler runs over you fingers!
The only setup that works is 2 dedicated winches.... and, yes, I know....
Theres gotta be a better system


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Old 25-02-2008, 06:14   #4
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<set the stop for the next tack where you want it... >

Although I’d guess your stop-gap method may be a tad too rustic for many, I’ve been content with it for some years… In fact my Irwin had essentially gennie-track with stops – as you suggest, it required thinking a little ahead of the next tack and a dab of white grease every so often – no bearings -- but don’t recall ever presenting a problem in the lazy-cruising environment…

Am putting an nice bronze (well used and nicely-aged, but way oversized) roller traveler on my little Bristol this spring, and for me that is a step up with the ball-bearings – but pin-stops on the car only and no control lines… I tend to keep my decks as gizmo-free as possible and what you suggest suits my slothful mode of sailing, at least – although I’m finding myself increasingly in the minority… but then I cruised the Potomac and the Bay for nearly ten years using a lead-line, so I tend to be a century or so behind the power curve…

Guess this doesn't exactly help with your dilema, but...
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Old 25-02-2008, 07:31   #5
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Do you really NEED a traveler that stops?

On my boat the block is just shackled to a metal bar and just slides to each side depending upon where it wants to go. I suppose to could tie a rope to it and cleat it off if I didn't want it to slide, but I've had no problems at all just letting it slide.

I'm sure there's some tiny bit of performance I could squeeze out of the boat if I weren't content with this setup. But as it is, I've got no problem with it and it really is no trouble at all, just have to watch that the main sheet doesn't get tangled up with the tiller as it slides.

On the other hand, maybe I'm just being ignorant and this is something important for bigger boats than mine. I don't know.
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Old 25-02-2008, 10:30   #6
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The system that you are talking about has been used on race boats for years. The cleats do have to be replaced every few years but on a crusing boat I imagine they would last longer. The pin stops, assuming you can find them, would be more bullet proof but harder to adjust. I would stick with what you have for awhile and test it out.
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Old 25-02-2008, 12:29   #7
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Better to have a traveler that is adjustable and stops. Not so much for racing performance but being able to power up in lighter winds and power down in heavier winds is a big plus and makes a big difference in keeping your boat "on its feet." Not heeling over so much and loosing ground to leeward when trying to get back to port is a big plus.
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Old 25-02-2008, 19:05   #8
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I'd rather keep all my fingers................._/)
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Old 25-02-2008, 19:19   #9
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Proper mainsheet traveler

Now THATS a proper mainsheet traveler adjusting system! I especially like the mainsheet blocks and the way that the camcleats for the traveler adjustment lines capture and release the lines. Convenient and safe!
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Old 25-02-2008, 21:12   #10
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That is a lot better with cam cleats than the clams on mine. Similar though with the way the line runs across to the other side...

Thanks for the picture Delmarrey.

I checked out the rail on mine, and it doesn't have holes for the pins to drop in. Its curved to the shape of the deck so it'd be a bit of a pain to drill for them unless I go oversized a hair. (I'm not that good at drilling free hand... )
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Old 26-02-2008, 18:49   #11
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When I'm on a close haul/reach, just before tacking over, I'll release the leeward cam cleat first and then the windward, allowing the car to travel over to the opposite side keeping it under control with hand tension.

Then lock both sides before the tack. This puts the car on the windward side for pulling in the main to center. It's a 4:1 purchase if I have to hoist it across, which is not EZ on a 380 sq. ft. main.
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