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Old 19-05-2015, 14:57   #1
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Standing Rigging

When do you replace standing rigging due to age? Our boat is always in fresh water for a boating season of 5 months.

What is risk of not replacing if there is no evidence of corrosion or cracking?

My marina storage manager said that if there was a breakage the insurance company may not pay for the loss of a mast due to poor scheduled maintenance. Your collective thoughts?

sailsdean@yahoo.com
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Old 19-05-2015, 16:12   #2
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Re: Standing Rigging

DeanPaul,

The answer to your question depends partly on your location and insurer; although it also depends on what your standing rigging is made from: Nichronic 50 (sp?), 316, 304, galvanized?

So, if you give us more specificity in your question, our answers will be more germane.

For our 316, and about 7,000 n. mi. per year cruising, we change on about 10 yr. span. However, we inspect frequently, and change the stays with the roller furlers on them more frequently because they are loaded differently when the sails are partially furled.

Ann
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Old 19-05-2015, 16:58   #3
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Re: Standing Rigging

Thanks Ann,

The boat is an Islander 30MKII ca 1973.

Rigging is most likely 316. I have owned the boat since new. Not sailed hard..stored for half its life with the mast down.

My question is...does fresh water use give me a different time for replacement? Visual rigging inspection at this time of year when the boat is launched does not show any trace of corrosion or cracks.

Cost to redo is around $2,000...lots for an old boat...but what are my choices?

Dean
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Old 19-05-2015, 17:35   #4
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Re: Standing Rigging

Dyneema or Spectra?
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Old 19-05-2015, 17:44   #5
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Re: Standing Rigging

Dean Paul, you might consider getting a rigging survey. Ask you insurance company if they have anyone approved or recommend. A rigging survey should be around $200 and that price may be applicable to any work the rig surveyor does.


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Old 19-05-2015, 18:10   #6
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Re: Standing Rigging

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Originally Posted by Dean Paul View Post
Thanks Ann,

The boat is an Islander 30MKII ca 1973.

Rigging is most likely 316. I have owned the boat since new. Not sailed hard..stored for half its life with the mast down.

My question is...does fresh water use give me a different time for replacement? Visual rigging inspection at this time of year when the boat is launched does not show any trace of corrosion or cracks.

Cost to redo is around $2,000...lots for an old boat...but what are my choices?

Dean
While rigging can fail due to corrosion, I think more common is failure due to fatigue associated with cyclic loading. So the replacement schedule really depends on how it was used. Since you haven't sailed it hard and the boat was laid up with the mast out for 6 months each year, I would think the rigging should easily last 20 years. You should carefully inspect it each spring and for peace of mind, occasionally check near the terminals with dye penetrant. And of course if you intend to do serious offshore cruising (e.g., Bermuda) you should probably just replace the rigging.
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Old 20-05-2015, 12:23   #7
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Re: Standing Rigging

SS in fresh water lasts as long as the boat in most instances. It should be inspected regularly for cracks in the swages or broken strands in the wire. Damage from corrosion is not an issue like in salt water but stress hardening and cracking is. The head stay should be carefully monitored for broken strands as it is subject to the most side loading.

Insurance companies will ask for a rigging survey and/or have a rigging exclusion if they are concerned about your rig.

You can re-rig the boat yourself cheaply with mechanical terminals like Norseman. Buy the wire and terminals and use the old wire as patterns. Use halyards as temporary stays when you bring down the wires to fabricate the new wires. After the first couple of terminals, you should be able to knock out fabrication in minutes per wire and re-rig the boat in less than a day. Use the money saved to buy a Top Cimber or climbing harness and gear to make going up the mast no problem.

Doubt that your boat was originally rigged with 316 wire. Production boat makersl used 304 for everything. 304 isn't bad, just less 'stainless' than 316. 304 is stronger than 316, btw.
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Old 20-05-2015, 20:16   #8
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Re: Standing Rigging

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Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
SS in fresh water lasts as long as the boat in most instances. It should be inspected regularly for cracks in the swages or broken strands in the wire. Damage from corrosion is not an issue like in salt water but stress hardening and cracking is. The head stay should be carefully monitored for broken strands as it is subject to the most side loading.

Insurance companies will ask for a rigging survey and/or have a rigging exclusion if they are concerned about your rig.

You can re-rig the boat yourself cheaply with mechanical terminals like Norseman. Buy the wire and terminals and use the old wire as patterns. Use halyards as temporary stays when you bring down the wires to fabricate the new wires. After the first couple of terminals, you should be able to knock out fabrication in minutes per wire and re-rig the boat in less than a day. Use the money saved to buy a Top Cimber or climbing harness and gear to make going up the mast no problem.

Doubt that your boat was originally rigged with 316 wire. Production boat makersl used 304 for everything. 304 isn't bad, just less 'stainless' than 316. 304 is stronger than 316, btw.
Those are all very good points.
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